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Old 05-16-2019, 11:25 AM
 
Location: NJ
31,771 posts, read 38,352,295 times
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i put in a couple of rows of green giants last fall. overall, they are looking pretty good. there is one dead one in this picture that has been replaced. there is another one with a dead piece but the rest looks pretty good. i should cut off the dead piece right? i left it so far but id like to just walk over the cut it off.

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Old 05-16-2019, 04:10 PM
 
8,406 posts, read 6,990,829 times
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Thank you for sharing. I'm considering a new lot that is similar to your backyard. I was wondering how fast the Arborvitae grow. I may need to plant more for privacy since the builder only added 5.
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Old 05-16-2019, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
80,390 posts, read 68,458,560 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by volkeyn View Post
it has been almost 2 months now since they have been planted...trees look healthy and have new growth on them, however for some reason they are not as dense as I saw at the other nurseries or HD...

Have you been fertilizing? I've switched between the EverGreen Spikes and HollyTone. Also consider trimming the tops, they bush out and get denser.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptainNJ View Post
i put in a couple of rows of green giants last fall. overall, they are looking pretty good. there is one dead one in this picture that has been replaced. there is another one with a dead piece but the rest looks pretty good. i should cut off the dead piece right? i left it so far but id like to just walk over the cut it off.

Yeah, cut it off. It's amazing how these things grow new shoots and fill in..

Quote:
Originally Posted by KayAnn246 View Post
Thank you for sharing. I'm considering a new lot that is similar to your backyard. I was wondering how fast the Arborvitae grow. I may need to plant more for privacy since the builder only added 5.
Mine are growing about 1-2 feet a year depending where you measure. First 2 yrs was under a foot.
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Old 05-16-2019, 10:01 PM
 
Location: D.C.
2,825 posts, read 3,060,939 times
Reputation: 4655
I’ve learned to not plant them too deep - the lowest branch needs to be above ground and try to get it where the flare of the bottom of the trunk is just barely exposed. I had two that were not doing as well as the others, dug around the base of the trunk removing about 2 inches of soil before getting to the flare. 2 months later, they’re doing MUCH better!

Fertilizer - I really like the Bayer 3-1 feed and protect, and holly tone (but man does it stink). If you spray them with a mix of talstarP (one ounce to one gallon of water) it helps with blight on the foliage and also gets and keeps the mites and spider and other bugs from eating them up.

Definitely trim off any dead limbs! Could be disease and will spread if not removed.

My 14 are doing well. Have seen some transplant shock on the lower limbs here and there, but nothing bad.

Here is another before/after of what they can do in 3 years time. The 3 on the right were 7 footers from container when installed in April 2016.. use the roof top of the neighbors bird house patio enclosure as reference...
Attached Thumbnails
Thula Green Giant Arborvitae (growth rate pictures)-f3e08d1f-5b74-4bf4-a6bc-104259405445.jpeg   Thula Green Giant Arborvitae (growth rate pictures)-6ee3f5a5-3218-4e9f-89f0-2fefb0b20a33.jpeg  
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Old 05-19-2019, 08:53 AM
 
6 posts, read 11,761 times
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here are the pics..any thoughts ?
Attached Thumbnails
Thula Green Giant Arborvitae (growth rate pictures)-img-20190314-wa0000.jpg   Thula Green Giant Arborvitae (growth rate pictures)-img-20190314-wa0001.jpg   Thula Green Giant Arborvitae (growth rate pictures)-img-20190314-wa0003.jpg   Thula Green Giant Arborvitae (growth rate pictures)-img-20190314-wa0004.jpg   Thula Green Giant Arborvitae (growth rate pictures)-img-20190314-wa0005.jpg  

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Old 05-19-2019, 05:33 PM
 
5,880 posts, read 3,022,286 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NC211 View Post
I’ve learned to not plant them too deep - the lowest branch needs to be above ground and try to get it where the flare of the bottom of the trunk is just barely exposed. I had two that were not doing as well as the others, dug around the base of the trunk removing about 2 inches of soil before getting to the flare. 2 months later, they’re doing MUCH better!

Fertilizer - I really like the Bayer 3-1 feed and protect, and holly tone (but man does it stink). If you spray them with a mix of talstarP (one ounce to one gallon of water) it helps with blight on the foliage and also gets and keeps the mites and spider and other bugs from eating them up.

Definitely trim off any dead limbs! Could be disease and will spread if not removed.

My 14 are doing well. Have seen some transplant shock on the lower limbs here and there, but nothing bad.

Here is another before/after of what they can do in 3 years time. The 3 on the right were 7 footers from container when installed in April 2016.. use the roof top of the neighbors bird house patio enclosure as reference...
Planting them too deep will lead to a quick death. Always better to plant higher than the original base height by just a few inches. Also need to water regularly for the first year to 18 months and the water quality will vary depending on the soil type, percolation rate. Mix some Bio-Tone in with the backfilling soil by the roots and make sure the ball roots are not circled around the root ball, like being root bound and just cut them with a shovel or hand tool to encourage growth into the new soil.

Also, trees need air movement so staggered line planting is better than in line planting and allows more growth without them growing into each other. And be sure to mulch the bottom to or beyond the drip line but be sure to keep the mulch away from the trunk by at least 6 inches all the way around. Happy growing!
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Old 05-21-2019, 09:58 AM
 
Location: Floribama
18,561 posts, read 40,092,034 times
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This is why mixed plantings are always better. When you have a wall of plantings of the same species its inevitable you will lose at least one, and then the whole thing looks odd.
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Old 05-21-2019, 07:27 PM
 
Location: KY
577 posts, read 391,890 times
Reputation: 1408
I ordered some Emerald Green Thuja Giants via the internet from a nursery in NC back in 2008, to make a green privacy border between us and the neighbors.

When I opened the four trees in the shipping bags I almost laughed. Just four little sticks in plastic bags about 4 ft.- 6 ft. tall by around 1/2" + inch in diameter. I did not expect much out of them after I planted them.

WOW, was I wrong, because they loved where they were planted and the soil conditions I guess. We would have done anything if we could have taken them with us, when we sold the house in 2015

As all of them were huge and beautiful at around 10 ft. tall. And they were as tough as nails, as the pics show them to be during the snow/ice damage they got. I just let them thaw out and stand back up on their own.

I had the big pine tree behind them taken down and that's when they really grew. I spaced them where they literally grew together and we could not even see through them hardly.

Last edited by greglovesoldtrucks; 05-22-2019 at 07:33 PM..
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Old 05-23-2019, 06:53 AM
 
6 posts, read 11,761 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by greglovesoldtrucks View Post
I ordered some Emerald Green Thuja Giants via the internet from a nursery in NC back in 2008, to make a green privacy border between us and the neighbors.

When I opened the four trees in the shipping bags I almost laughed. Just four little sticks in plastic bags about 4 ft.- 6 ft. tall by around 1/2" + inch in diameter. I did not expect much out of them after I planted them.

WOW, was I wrong, because they loved where they were planted and the soil conditions I guess. We would have done anything if we could have taken them with us, when we sold the house in 2015

As all of them were huge and beautiful at around 10 ft. tall. And they were as tough as nails, as the pics show them to be during the snow/ice damage they got. I just let them thaw out and stand back up on their own.

I had the big pine tree behind them taken down and that's when they really grew. I spaced them where they literally grew together and we could not even see through them hardly.

I have seen your pics...not sure why you have removed them though...your green giants look great...so this proves that even if they look like a stick when they are young, they can thrive and look gorgeous if the environment conditions are good for them....
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Old 05-23-2019, 07:56 AM
 
Location: KY
577 posts, read 391,890 times
Reputation: 1408
Quote:
Originally Posted by volkeyn View Post
I have seen your pics...not sure why you have removed them though...your green giants look great...so this proves that even if they look like a stick when they are young, they can thrive and look gorgeous if the environment conditions are good for them....
Thanks, the Thuja Emerald Green Giants are great trees to have IMO.

Whenever I post my pics of our previous homes project(s) that I did on them, I try to edit them where they will not be recognized by the present property owner. And my Thuja pics were from one of our previous homes.

Because I am basically posting pics of someone else's property now. So while not being sure they would appreciate seeing their property pics being posted on the internet by its previous owner. (me) I then delete them shortly after. I do the same with my sketches that I draw and post for info.

And also people need to be aware that whenever they post their pics on a "public domain" website, their pics can end up on the Bing images or other hosts sites, for anyone to copy/paste/alter if they choose to, for their own use. This is one of the few sites I am on, that really enforce the CR rules and that does a great job of reminding people of the CR rules. But even CD cannot control what happens to our personally taken photos, that we post on here.

JMO
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