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View Poll Results: Do you grow potatoes?
YES! I grow and eat potatoes. 8 34.78%
No, forget all that work! They're cheap to buy. 12 52.17%
Love me some waffle fries! 5 21.74%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 23. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 05-23-2019, 01:52 PM
 
4,152 posts, read 3,762,896 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tn_eddy View Post
They do come from nowhere, apparently....because we had some the first year of growing in a new location, well away from anyone else. Some years they are worse than others, but last several years, they haven't been enough of them to bother spraying. If I do spray, I use this Bonide product, which is organic approved, and does knock then right out. But we grow 4-600' row feet per year. For a small patch, it's just about as easy to pick the big, fat, slow moving things (see pic on bottle) off and squish them. Another pest that will eat the leaves to some point, but usually not enough to kill the plant are flea beetles....they drill small holes in the leaves.

One of the great advantages of growing your own is the amount of pesticides you avoid. I read once commercial potatoes contain the residue of dozens of pesticides/herbicides/fungicides. We grow Yukon Gold (best long term keeper) and Kennebec varieties.

This is our fall crop in the root cellar. We store them on homemade screens that allow air to circulate around the layers, and if one does rot, it doesn't spread as bad. Screens are 2'x3' with 1/2" hardware cloth centers. The bags are small ones we'll keep for next year's seed.
Cool post, thanks!
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Old 05-23-2019, 02:18 PM
 
Location: In the Pearl of the Purchase, Ky
8,054 posts, read 13,504,316 times
Reputation: 33409
On planting in stray, a friend dug a trench down the middle of his garden, put down down his potatoes and filled the trench with straw. Said every year he had done this he got plenty of potatoes but the skin is not as thick as if grown in dirt. But a lot easier to harvest.
A coworker planted his in car tires. Filled the tire with dirt and straw mixed and, as the plants grew, put another tire on top. Lot of taters would be found inside the tires
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Old 05-23-2019, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Sale Creek, TN
4,114 posts, read 3,828,283 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
One advantage of growing your own potatoes is that you can dig up and eat "new potatoes" ( the little bitty waxy guys that are so tasty)
Cooked in your fresh picked green beans, delicious.
I have no luck with potatoes. They would grow pretty plants and bloom, have new potatoes and then field mice and other underground critters would hit around Labor Day when I would plan to dig.
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Old 06-08-2019, 08:11 AM
 
4,152 posts, read 3,762,896 times
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Here's another question. I've planted most of my taters in the lawn, on flat ground. The grass is growing high because they love the extra watering. I don't like it because I have to hand-weed the grass and avoid the area with the mower. As the plants grow, I'm planning to put some kind of netting over them to keep the rodents away.

I wanted to put black gardening fabric around each plant, to kill off the grass, but the wife said I shouldn't. I'm wondering if wood chips would do just as well. I also have a bunch of extra grass clippings from mowing but I somehow think that would not stop grass from growing back.

By the way, I've never used a bag on the mower, preferring to let the clippings naturally decay back into the soil. But capturing the clippings turned out to be a bonanza for our compost bin -- the stuff composts like magic and is so plentiful; I ran out of room in the bin and had to pile up extra clippings next to it. Maybe I should throw a spud or two into the pile and see if it grows?
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Old 06-09-2019, 04:19 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
72,198 posts, read 55,211,335 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tn_eddy View Post
This is our fall crop in the root cellar. We store them on homemade screens that allow air to circulate around the layers, and if one does rot, it doesn't spread as bad. Screens are 2'x3' with 1/2" hardware cloth centers. The bags are small ones we'll keep for next year's seed.
Awesome root cellar! That's a lot of Potatoes! Very cool.
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Old 06-13-2019, 05:23 AM
 
Location: New England
316 posts, read 218,200 times
Reputation: 660
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tn_eddy View Post
They do come from nowhere, apparently....because we had some the first year of growing in a new location, well away from anyone else. Some years they are worse than others, but last several years, they haven't been enough of them to bother spraying. If I do spray, I use this Bonide product, which is organic approved, and does knock then right out. But we grow 4-600' row feet per year. For a small patch, it's just about as easy to pick the big, fat, slow moving things (see pic on bottle) off and squish them. Another pest that will eat the leaves to some point, but usually not enough to kill the plant are flea beetles....they drill small holes in the leaves.








One of the great advantages of growing your own is the amount of pesticides you avoid. I read once commercial potatoes contain the residue of dozens of pesticides/herbicides/fungicides. We grow Yukon Gold (best long term keeper) and Kennebec varieties.


This is our fall crop in the root cellar. We store them on homemade screens that allow air to circulate around the layers, and if one does rot, it doesn't spread as bad. Screens are 2'x3' with 1/2" hardware cloth centers. The bags are small ones we'll keep for next year's seed.


Awesome root cellar! There was one in our farmhouse when we bought it we use it for our garden as well. I like your potato racks as an idea to add. We also grow Kennebec along with a red fingerling and an all purple variety. We take the reg fingerlings cut them in half, coat with olive oil, salt, pepper and rosemary. Then roast in the oven at 375 for a hour. Happy growing.
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