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Old 06-02-2019, 01:11 PM
 
7,884 posts, read 4,914,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tallysmom View Post
Avocados can stay on the tree till needed. Then pulled they’ll ripen. We have a big tree, and we give away a ton. People love them.
You can leave them on the tree for a good long time, but not forever. At a certain point the remaining fruit needs to be picked and put into cold storage, or it will rot and fall off (or be eaten by rats) without ever reaching "ripeness." We had a big tree when I was growing up, and it was almost impossible to use all of the avocados or even give them all away because most of our neighbors had their own trees, too!
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Old 06-02-2019, 01:42 PM
 
Location: SoCal
17,238 posts, read 8,050,509 times
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I have 3 avocado trees, all small because I want them small. All in pots, I don’t want boat loads of avocados, I don’t even like to eat them. But the fruit trees I have are bare in the winter, at least the avocados have leaves.
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Old 06-02-2019, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Southern MN
7,176 posts, read 4,068,614 times
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I have a lovely Japanese choke cherry tree but you can't eat the fruit. Southern MN.

Maybe this is a good spot to tell our funny story of the week. In planting our outdoor planters a couple of weeks ago, DH found a walnut that a squirrel had planted and it was sprouting.

He decided to plant it in the yard and when it was larger move it somewhere else because the nuts and unfriendly sap would be problematic in our yard.

The other day - sunny, he removed the milk container protection so it could get a little sun. Mr. Squirrel came and took his walnut back!
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Old 06-02-2019, 04:25 PM
 
Location: Top of the South, NZ
17,704 posts, read 14,682,180 times
Reputation: 5905
Citrus mostly end up on the ground here, Most houses probably have a tree or two, so giving them away, isn't easy.

We eat most of our avocados, and ones that get missed end up on the ground for chickens and pigs, like another poster mentioned.

Cherries, almonds and avocados can grow in the same regions, it's just depends on the climate.

Persimmons might be suitable for 7b climates
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:27 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
31,722 posts, read 57,739,608 times
Reputation: 34302
Cherries need a pollinator, you cannot plant one Rainier and expect fruit. You have to plant another variety such as Celeste near it. Almonds will be OK in your zone if protect the first few years.
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Old 06-02-2019, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Puna, Hawaii
2,123 posts, read 2,328,278 times
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Avocados are not dioecious. But that does not make them easy to fruit. Avocado sex is more complicated than just needing a second tree- it needs a second tree of a complementing type. But it can be a long ways away (I have no idea where our pollinators are bringing it in from, I'm just super-glad that they do!). This article explains it fairly well: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/need-t...uce-64818.html


I can't speak for all zones but you can fruit avocados in large pots outside their "normal" growing areas by taking the normal measures one takes.
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Old 06-03-2019, 07:53 AM
 
Location: A noncontiguous State
4,460 posts, read 2,401,387 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Hi, I'm thinking about having 2 or 3 fruit & nut trees in my yard when I buy my new house.

I'm planning on a dwarf almond tree and a dwarf Rainier cherry tree. I can always freeze, dehydrate, or vacuum pack the cherries and almonds.

I'm also contemplating either a dwarf citrus tree or even a dwarf avocado tree. My question is, what to do with the extra citrus or avocados. There is some flexibility with the citrus. However, avocados don't last long or store well.

Any other suggestions for dwarf fruit or nut trees? Do any of you grow fruit or nuts in your yards?
Avocados- Very nutritious and quite popular in my household. A small Sharwil cultivar tree, for example, will produce several dozen- perhaps a couple 100- fruit in a long season. As others have said, you pick a few about one week or so before wanting to eat them. If you have too many ripen at once, just put in refrigerator. This way you can have avocados from one tree for at least 2-3 months.

That said, I'm skeptical of avocado and citrus growing in your location. Instead, I'd opt for apple, pear, peach-something like that. And don't forget about berries. Blueberries and raspberries are fantastic.
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Old 06-03-2019, 09:14 AM
 
Location: California
4,625 posts, read 5,719,831 times
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My friend has a neighbor with a cherry tree in 7B which produces a lot of fruit - on the ground. Since it is hard to keep small cherries cleaned up there is a rodent infestation so my friend spent thousands to get rid of them.
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Old 06-03-2019, 10:20 AM
 
Location: A noncontiguous State
4,460 posts, read 2,401,387 times
Reputation: 5318
Quote:
Originally Posted by Heidi60 View Post
My friend has a neighbor with a cherry tree in 7B which produces a lot of fruit - on the ground. Since it is hard to keep small cherries cleaned up there is a rodent infestation so my friend spent thousands to get rid of them.
This post raises a couple obvious questions. Why does no one pick the cherries? In lieu of that, why not cut the tree down rather than spend thousands?

Thousands spent on rodent removal? Guess what-it won't work! I won't leave you hanging for a reason-it's because they will keep coming. Illegal immigration, you know?
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Old 06-03-2019, 11:42 AM
 
Location: North East
147 posts, read 58,256 times
Reputation: 454
I would try peach trees. I started with pear trees which need a pollinator. 4 years in, and still no fruit. I planted a peach tree, and it isn't growing fast. The second year it bore fruit, this will be the third year. You don't really need to bu a dwarf tree. Just learn how to prune them back, and they will remain "dwarf".
I second raspberries! Mmmmm
They grow easy, then at the end of the season, just now them down to the ground, place a layer of mulch on top, and wait till next years crop to rise up!
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