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Old 06-08-2019, 08:21 AM
 
Location: NJ
12,523 posts, read 22,513,314 times
Reputation: 11462

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Quote:
Originally Posted by JonahWicky View Post
I'm looking to add some curb appeal to the front of my house. Right now it has a hedge of azaleas and some very simple underplanting (not sure what the plant is called). I recently cut back every other azalea with the thought of putting some different shrubs in between and/or some flowering perennials. I haven't actually removed the stumps yet, in case I change my mind.

Some pertinent info:
Coastal SC, zone 8
Changing the shutters is an option, but repainting the trim is not.
The area gets partial sun and the soil is sandy and well draining.
The palm tree on the right and the mature camellia on the left have to stay.
Low maintenance is important.
Budget is flexible but not extravagant.

I'd love to hear any advice or suggestions for seasonal pops of color and year round visual interest. I'd prefer to keep at least a couple of the azaleas. The flowers are a beautiful pink and it's kind of a rite of spring around here.
I think you have a good start with what you cut down. Have you seen any gardens with azalea's and perennials or grasses that you liked? That would be the place to start. Next would be do you like flowers, grasses, other bushes? Bulbs are another option. I think tulips and daffs look great with azaleas.

What color is the camellia and when does it bloom?

Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
I would try to unify the look across the entire frontage by bringing out the planting area in the front of the house as others have said at least even with the area of the palm. It doesn't need to be a straight line. I agree with trimming some lower branches of the trees to the left and possibly move some or all the azaleas into a grouping under those trees.

It's hard to see where your property extends on the other side of the driveway where the red reflector is in the second picture but I would try to use the same dark natural mulch there as in front of the house and around the palm. The back of that area could also be a landing spot for a couple of the azaleas with the front the same as what you put in front of the house. The rocks and few pots by the palm don't really help. To modernize and lighten the look I'd try to mostly use some limited growth decorative grasses in front of the house and by the driveway with a few small colorful bloomers and keep away from regimented rows and borders of anything for a casual look.

Taking it a step further I see the roots of the big tree in the middle of the yard are a problem for the grass so you may want to create an island around it with minimal plantings similar, but probably smaller than what you'll have in front of the house. The island doesn't need to be a perfect circle. That tree might also benefit from taking off some lower branches,

As far as changing the shutters I'm not sure whether you're actually talking about replacing them or just painting; they are very narrow for the house but that may be due to very limited clearance for the one next to the bump out. Those will always be in the shadows but the ones framing the big window just look odd. If you only change that pair make sure you match the style and the frame thicknesses and locations to those that will remain.

Painting the shutters and (inner) door a lighter color, possibly a light sage green will complete the brighter look. I'll leave it to those more familiar with your area to suggest specific plants but anything with the word "dwarf" in the name sounds good as does anything with minimal maintenance requirements.
Agree. A light sage would look really good.
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Old 06-08-2019, 11:43 AM
 
1,356 posts, read 940,763 times
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Thanks for all the input. There's a lot to think about now. A few things that were mentioned:

I like the idea of black shutters. Looking around my neighborhood, a lot of the other red brick houses have them. Most of those have either a white or black door, neither of which really pop. I did a crude photoshop with black shutters and a red door that I think might work (see pic below). Maybe not that exact shade of red, but I do like the contrast.

I also like the idea of pulling the bed out further from the house. The azaleas are old and well established and would be hard to move. By making room in front of them I could add a lower level or even 2 of other plants.

The trees definitely could use some pruning. The one at the left end is a very mature bright red camellia that blooms prolifically in the winter. Do you think it's too far from the house to anchor that corner? I could remove the last azalea if it would help. The other trees near the left end are crepe myrtles. The one in the middle of the yard that drops all the leaves (practically year-round) is a magnolia. It's pretty hideous from the butchery that the power company does to clear their wires, and nothing grows in the root mass at the base. I'd take it down except for the nice shade it provides to the front of the house. I agree it needs a border, but it may have to be just mulched and a few potted plants.

I also like the suggestions for hostas (no deer problem, just gators) and jasmine. I have jasmine in the back yard and it's extremely aggressive, like taking over the area! I'd need to find something compact that doesn't grow 6" a day.

The crawl space vents are all sealed up and I'll want something that hides them. The "wire" you see is actually the dehumidifier drain hose. The roof is a medium gray and was redone last spring.
Attached Thumbnails
Help me do some landscaping-2019-06-05-15.44.58-red.jpg  
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Old 06-08-2019, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,270 posts, read 1,058,731 times
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Very cute house. It does look good with black shutters. I thought vent d on homes were essential so as to have ventilation and not get a build up of moisture. Check with someone who knows about that stuff before you block vents. I don't think they are unsightly, just part of your house. Maybe you can get different ones if those bother you.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:04 PM
 
1,356 posts, read 940,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Izzie1213 View Post
Very cute house. It does look good with black shutters. I thought vent d on homes were essential so as to have ventilation and not get a build up of moisture. Check with someone who knows about that stuff before you block vents. I don't think they are unsightly, just part of your house. Maybe you can get different ones if those bother you.
Trust me, I did extensive research on crawlspaces (I'm an engineer). The preferred method, at least in the humid south, is to encapsulate and dehumidify or condition the space. Mine was a moldy mess when we bought the place. I had a floor liner put in, removed the waterlogged fiberglass insulation in the floor joists, sealed up all the vents, added 2 HVAC drops (ductwork is in the attic), and installed a dehumidifier. The RH went from 70-80% to 50% and my wood floors stopped buckling.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:47 PM
 
Location: SoCal
17,136 posts, read 7,996,796 times
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How about some color around like azealas or rhododendrons, they grow very well with little care.
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Old 06-08-2019, 01:56 PM
 
2,074 posts, read 800,201 times
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Nice to see the roof color on your house. Ours will be similar. (So many shades of gray, I forget the exact name.)
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:04 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,270 posts, read 1,058,731 times
Reputation: 4097
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonahWicky View Post
Trust me, I did extensive research on crawlspaces (I'm an engineer). The preferred method, at least in the humid south, is to encapsulate and dehumidify or condition the space. Mine was a moldy mess when we bought the place. I had a floor liner put in, removed the waterlogged fiberglass insulation in the floor joists, sealed up all the vents, added 2 HVAC drops (ductwork is in the attic), and installed a dehumidifier. The RH went from 70-80% to 50% and my wood floors stopped buckling.
I wondered about that. Not terribly familiar with that type of house, except about 7 years living in Texas. No basements like in Minnesota and either slab or post and beam like you probably have. Had heard of issues with humidity under post and beam, that's why the vents. Can't imagine what a horrible job it would be to be crawling around under there doing work!
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:45 PM
 
1,356 posts, read 940,763 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Izzie1213 View Post
I wondered about that. Not terribly familiar with that type of house, except about 7 years living in Texas. No basements like in Minnesota and either slab or post and beam like you probably have. Had heard of issues with humidity under post and beam, that's why the vents. Can't imagine what a horrible job it would be to be crawling around under there doing work!
Crawlspaces are the norm around here. They're typically 2-3 ft. high with a dirt floor. I've spent a lot of time in mine, and yes...it's miserable!
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Old 06-08-2019, 02:48 PM
 
1,356 posts, read 940,763 times
Reputation: 2580
Quote:
Originally Posted by petsandgardens View Post
Nice to see the roof color on your house. Ours will be similar. (So many shades of gray, I forget the exact name.)
I wanted a lighter color to cut down in the solar heat gain. I think it was called Slate Gray. Your roofer can show you actual samples to hold up next to the house. That's really the only way to know for sure what works.
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Old 06-08-2019, 04:46 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,629 posts, read 24,711,009 times
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Nice house! Now that I see the roof, I wonder if a really dark gray or charcoal paint might look nice on the shutters instead of black, to complement the gray roof. It would still give you great contrast, but be a little softer and blend nicely with the roof.

I'm jealous with your ability to use photoshop. I always thought that would be really fun to learn how to do.
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