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Old 06-15-2019, 12:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
Mint and ferns seem to like shady areas around here.
Mint seems to grow well in the sunnier part of my gardens.

I'm loving hummingbird mint these days.

Also ferns.

Thanks.
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Hostas like wet feet, and so do Japanese iris. Liriope seems to grow everywhere.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Agreed, but if you have rabbits in the area they will eat the hostas. Use Yellow Flag Iris for some higher color.
Have some blue flag iris I could transplant and some variegated liriope. Will see how they do.
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:25 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
Not sure where you are at but this might be of interest.
https://ag.tennessee.edu/watersheds/Documents/D22.pdf

Out of that list of plants I've had the following in my 7b Memphis yard, with an AC drain pipe that drained directly next to my foundation leaving a very wet patch of soil in the summer:

Baptisia, pretty, but big and gangly, mine definitely needed to hide behind something to cover their knobby knees
Joe Pye weed, not the prettiest or most colorful, but a good mid height plant and not at all fussy
Turtle heads, love the wet, not my favorite as they are sort of stiff looking, lol
Cardinal flower, love them, lots of types to choose from
Columbine, beautiful delicate flowers, but never had much luck getting them established
Blue flag iris, pretty, good for adding height
Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Thanks, I found this very interesting. Love false indigo. Mine is purple but it also comes in yellow. My soil is too rich so it's floppy like peonies so it needs support.
Great website.

Thanks for the suggestions.
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Old 06-15-2019, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
39,129 posts, read 48,098,991 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by writerwife View Post
I am in the same zone and my entire yard is semi-shade to deep shade. My biggest difficulty is the deer. I have to spray most of my landscaping with repellent every so often or they will eat everything down to the nubs. But.. I thought I could mention some of the plants that I have that are doing well in the shade (not sure about the rain part).
I've only been here close to a yr so it's a work in progress and these are the ones that are looking nice thus far.

Fushia (doing great with beautiful pink/purple blossoms)
Begonias (several types - they get some spattering of sunlight at times)
Kangaroo fern (love it)
Asparagus fern
Elephant ears
heuchera
Hostas (even if everyone has them, there's a reason)
Fantasy Perilla
some smaller variegated grasses
Various Coleus
Mahonia (soft caress)
Columbine
ajuga
Dianthus
Creeping Jenny
(as much as I can't stand them but have a few, Nandinas suck up a lot of water)
About the Nandina....the ones I have (lemon &lime) thrive in a dry flower bed that not much else will grow in. I never water them, they stay about 2’ tall and look terrific.
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Old 06-15-2019, 04:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
About the Nandina....the ones I have (lemon &lime) thrive in a dry flower bed that not much else will grow in. I never water them, they stay about 2’ tall and look terrific.
Nandina, variegated liriope, Chindo virbunam, ... all seem to thrive around here with little care or water.

Not sure how any of them would do in a rain garden where it might be boggy at times and dry at others.
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Old 06-15-2019, 07:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GotHereQuickAsICould View Post
Nandina, variegated liriope, Chindo virbunam, ... all seem to thrive around here with little care or water.

Not sure how any of them would do in a rain garden where it might be boggy at times and dry at others.
Off topic but I love liriope! The plants were in part shade and survived from year to year, but never flourished. I pulled them out. Replaced with them with lady's mantle which are growing like crazy!

Unfortunately, lady's mantle doesn't like wet soil, but Irises do.

https://www.hgtv.com/design/outdoor-...rlogged-garden
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Old 06-16-2019, 06:01 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
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Oh yeah.. and hellebore does very well in shade and the critters don't like it much.
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Old 06-16-2019, 10:53 AM
 
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If it is of interest to you: try to plant our native plants;
Most of others are brought from China, Korea, Japan, tropics: for our native insects and animals they are the same as plink plastic flamingoes in the yard- they can’t use them, starting the chain of dying out species from local flowers, herbs and trees to insects, birds, animals.
The non- native are supporting an awful number of invasive pests which again was brought from Asia.
Hopefully, you find something you like and can use.
https://www.prairienursery.com/store...or-moist-soils
https://extension.psu.edu/plant-guid...-to-moist-soil

Even sun loving natives for wet souls may do ok- they may not flower too much, but the foliage could be pretty...
P.S.
Some of the native perennials could be very tall and unruly looking- just cut them in half to 1/2 height earlier than they start making flower buds- they will be shorter as a result but more blooms...more garden like looking vs a wild look
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Old 06-16-2019, 10:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by writerwife View Post
Oh yeah.. and hellebore does very well in shade and the critters don't like it much.
I love hellabore but it is poisonous.

It's a terrific, long-lived plant. The flowers are so cheerful when nothing else is in bloom. Now I think I'll have a find a spot for it - away from my plant nibbling dogs!

Quote:
Nik4me: Hopefully, you find something you like and can use.
https://www.prairienursery.com/store...or-moist-soils
https://extension.psu.edu/plant-guid...-to-moist-soil

Even sun loving natives for wet souls may do ok- they may not flower too much, but the foliage could be pretty...
P.S.
I had a grove of Black Cohosh - Actaea racemosa under trees in a wet area. OMG, they were so pretty. I can't recommend them enough. Striking black leaves and stem with arching white flowers. I tried growing them in my present home but conditions were not right.

I also had Goat's Beard (Aruncus dioicus) and Canada Anemone (Anemone canadensis) along with dogwoods.

Nike4me's list also has Virginia Bluebells which I have now. It's the first early spring flowers out in zone 5. Unfortunately after its season, it disappears until next spring. I leave its area vacant during the summer. It slowly spreads. Well worth it - even for a month or two.

Last edited by YorktownGal; 06-16-2019 at 11:13 AM..
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Old 06-17-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
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My nandinas do well in our heat and drought but they do well if there's flooding too. That's why a lot of builders around here will have them placed around a foundation... they seem to survive almost anything but if it rains a lot (like the weather here in Bama) they will absorb a lot of the water. That's what I meant by 'suck up'.. not that they require it but they will drink in a lot if it gets soggy out.
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