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Old 06-15-2019, 01:37 PM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
Growing tomatoes for the first time and the plants are huge, they look healthy and I am seeing tomatoes growing already.

I’ve been noting some of the lower leaves on two plants are turning yellow, am I overwatering?

I water each one with about 1 gallon of water each morning when we have not received any rain.
Don't know if watering is what is causing the problem. but yes, you are watering too often and maybe not enough at any one time. Also tomatoes, like most summer produce does like some heat. I don't know about where you live but we haven't had many days with a lot of heat yet.
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Old 06-15-2019, 01:53 PM
 
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Watering each morning with 1 gallon of water seems excessive. With tomatoes, too much water is more of a problem than too little water. That is especially true when tomatoes start to ripen. At that point, too much water can lead to the tomatoes splitting.
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Old 06-16-2019, 09:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemstone1 View Post
Likewise, I think 1 gal/day is excessive, but I will say I have never tried growing tomatoes in a bucket. I'm sure they will dry out faster and the soil will heat up more than if direct planted. Is there any way to shade the bucket (roots), but not he plant....like with straw bales ?

Regards
Gemstone1
Thought I read somewhere that the sun warms the roots of the plants and that is what promotes good growth?
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Old 06-16-2019, 11:01 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
Thought I read somewhere that the sun warms the roots of the plants and that is what promotes good growth?
Warmer soil helps up to a point. I've grown tomatoes in containers and they've done quite well. They do tend to dry out quicker but tomatoes don't need as much water as you might think. Just don't overdo it and you should be fine.
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Old 06-20-2019, 05:15 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
Thought I read somewhere that the sun warms the roots of the plants and that is what promotes good growth?
Warm, not hot. 60s-70s soil temp is fine but can get into the 80s/90s You'll be amazed at how hot a pot can get with summer sun and all that moisture evaporates fast. But if you're watering the way you do I don't think the soil needs to be shaded. Have you let up on the watering?


Also, when the plant gets bigger the leaves will be shading the soil anyway. You have to experience what works because weather conditions and plant growth wont be the same each month or year.
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Old 06-20-2019, 06:05 AM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
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The Raleigh, NC author of Epic Tomatoes, Craig LeHoullier, utilizes container gardening on his driveway for his main tomato growing area. IMO, it is a must have book for tomato growers.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 06-20-2019, 06:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by double6's View Post
cut the lowest two or three branches off to promote better air circulation anyhow..stick your finger in the soil all the way up to your last knuckle..if dry, water, if not leave it until the next day..depending on how much fertilizer you mixed in you might want to add some once a week or so..
Definitely fertilize. Tomatoes are big feeders. Even your used coffee grinds helps add nitrogen. However, there are many commercially made organic tomatoes fertilizers

Tomato plants prune well. Wash your clippers with rubbing alcohol to kill virus and bacteria before pruning. Cutting off the lower branches helps as double6's said.
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Old 06-20-2019, 08:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
Definitely fertilize. Tomatoes are big feeders. Even your used coffee grinds helps add nitrogen. However, there are many commercially made organic tomatoes fertilizers

Tomato plants prune well. Wash your clippers with rubbing alcohol to kill virus and bacteria before pruning. Cutting off the lower branches helps as double6's said.
One needs to be careful not to provide too much nitrogen. Not only are tomato plants susceptible to nitrogen burn, but nitrogen will promote foliage growth at the expense of other plant development, especially flower and fruit growth. The plants may look better, but if they don't produce as much that kind of defeats the purpose.
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Old 06-26-2019, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Somewhere, out there in Zone7B
4,990 posts, read 6,676,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nmnita View Post
Don't know if watering is what is causing the problem. but yes, you are watering too often and maybe not enough at any one time. Also tomatoes, like most summer produce does like some heat. I don't know about where you live but we haven't had many days with a lot of heat yet.
I agree...too much watering. The roots won't go down deep doing that. I only water when we haven't had any rain for quite a few days and the tomatoes show a tiny bit of droop.
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Old 06-29-2019, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Surfside Beach, SC
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I've grown tomatoes for my entire life, both in the ground and in containers. I agree with the others that you are most likely overwatering a bit, but if you have good drainage, maybe not. You said that you drilled holes in the pot. When you water, does any water drain out of the holes at all? That would help you know if you are overwatering or under watering.

Some yellow leaves at the bottom of the plant can be perfectly normal. So there's that to also consider.

The main issue I see with your plant is that the pot looks way too small. I think you should transplant it into a bigger pot with more soil, etc. The other good thing about doing this is that you will be able to check for root rot and also see how dry or wet the soil is at the bottom of the pot. I would not fertilize at this point. The plant is probably root bound and needs more room to grow properly. The first thing I would do is to transplant it and go from there. Do it soon, before it gets much bigger and have someone help you so that there is less trauma to the plant. Put it in a much bigger pot!

Also, if you haven't already done this, you should check the underside of the leaves because it looks as if something might be eating parts of them - those little holes in the bottom leaves look like something could be eating them.

As far as watering goes - I like to totally drench all of my plants, until all the air bubbles are finished popping up and then let the soil dry out a bit - not too much - prior to watering them again. After the drenching, then you can keep the soil moist and don't let it dry out too much.

Hope this helps!
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