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Old 06-22-2019, 11:28 PM
 
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Would love to grow live oak its a beautiful tree
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Old 06-23-2019, 12:49 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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I have one here in Sammamish, WA where it gets down to about -9C, but I grow it as a bonsai, and when it gets to about -6C I protect it with mulch over the pot and trunk. It started as an acorn that I collected from the Walnut Creek, CA area. According to the USDA, they are only hardy down to -20C in the ground once established. Below that will kill it.
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Old 06-23-2019, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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Quote:
Originally Posted by veeman123 View Post
Would love to grow live oak its a beautiful tree
Do you mean the southern live oak that grows naturally in the southern US? The answer is you can't, unless you have a large heated conservatory.

If you mean any evergreen oak, your best bet is a live oak from Europe or Asia. I don't think there are any US live oaks that will grow in the ground that far north.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Live_oak

The approach I would take is to analyze just what appeals to you about the southern live oak (if that's the tree you are talking about), and see what trees also share those characteristics. Could be an oak, but could be a member of another plant family as well.

There might be a native Carolinian tree species that can survive that far north, but I kind of doubt it. Trees grow where they are best adapted, after all.

Last edited by jacqueg; 06-23-2019 at 04:09 PM..
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Old 06-23-2019, 04:29 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Live Oaks can reportedly survive in growing zones 6 to 10. Essex County, Ontario is in a solid zone 6a, so you might just squeak by and manage to get a live oak to survive at your location. The only way you'll find out is to try it.

South Carolina's growing zones are 5b through to 8b so you could try growing other South Carolinian plants that will grow in zones 5b, 6 and 6a. You will need to determine what the growing zone for any particular plant or tree is before installing it in your garden. Just make sure you don't try to import any invasives, restricted or banned plants from the southeast States or you will get into hugely major big trouble with Agriculture Canada and Customs Canada.

.
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Old 06-24-2019, 10:24 AM
 
44 posts, read 11,933 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I have one here in Sammamish, WA where it gets down to about -9C, but I grow it as a bonsai, and when it gets to about -6C I protect it with mulch over the pot and trunk. It started as an acorn that I collected from the Walnut Creek, CA area. According to the USDA, they are only hardy down to -20C in the ground once established. Below that will kill it.

Not the same live oak. The South Carolina Georgia live Oak is different than the Californian.
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Old 06-25-2019, 08:50 AM
 
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Yes, forget the California variety.

Now the Southern Live Oak grows naturally up to Virginia Beach, VA which is USDA Zone 8A. I have wondered if I could grow one in Maryland Zone 7A. I have seen some accounts of people doing so in places like Missouri and Indiana which get colder than here.

So yea, with some luck, you might pull it off. I would try to procure a decent size tree and treat like a Fig for the first few years: Southern exposure, lots of mulch, and wrap it in burlap or use Christmas lights during the Winter.

If that works, then get yourself a white suit and some bourbon to complete the picture.
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Old 06-25-2019, 01:00 PM
 
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They grow in Charlotte in zone 8a but they struggle even with the urban heat island effect. I can only imagine growing one successfully in zone 6 if it was a very protected area such as an urban courtyard where the canopy is lower than the building height.

I've also seen trees that appear to be hybridized red/live oaks. Maybe you could find one of those and try it.
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Old 06-29-2019, 07:45 PM
 
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in a protected spot, you MIGHT get the tree to survive but whether it would be reliably evergreen or grow to "normal" size and shape is likely rather problematic. as a (rough) rule of thumb, if you don't see other evergreen broadleaved trees (oaks, laurels, whatever---evergreen conifers don't count, by the way, LOL) growing successfully in your area or in your garden then you have strong concerns about growing this tree .there are some potentially hardier forms from north Texas and extreme southern Oklahoma known as q. virginiana ssp. fusiformis (or q. fusiformis) but whether they will be reliably evergreen where you are is still a question. OTOH, the southern "laurel oaks" (quercus laurifolia and q. hemispherica) can be evergreen, semi-evergreen, or deciduous depending on climate but are potentially hardy in USDA 6---though again, they will likely loose most or all of their leaves in the colder zones and harsher winters. good luck in your growing whatever you try.

Last edited by georgeinbandonoregon; 06-29-2019 at 08:49 PM..
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