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Old 07-03-2019, 06:26 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
10,493 posts, read 8,510,100 times
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I was Google Street viewing Tampa, and I noticed this deciduous tree (whatever it is) seemed to have dropped its leaves in the winter (December):

https://www.google.com/maps/place/26...65071?hl=en-GB

Even Miami had fall foliage in winter (at least here in this street):

https://www.google.com/maps/@26.2670...i6656?hl=en-GB

I wonder which deciduous (or 'autumn foliage') plant species can survive down there (i.e. sweetgums, poplars, acers, etc). Obviously I cannot tell what species these deciduous trees from the street view are, so this got me wondering.
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Old 07-03-2019, 11:21 AM
 
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Deciduous trees will grow as far south in the US as you want them to. As well as all the way to the equator. The trees of the Amazon rain forest are deciduous trees, many of them. Just because a tree is growing somewhere so hot that it doesn't drop its leaves doesn't make it not deciduous, it just makes it a deciduous tree in a climate where it doesn't drop its leaves. For example, all through the southern USA, live oaks retain their leaves year-round. But that doesn't make them conifers. The same species, growing up North, will lose its leaves in winter.


The two main divisions of trees are deciduous (broad leaves, seeds, most but not all lose their leaves in winter) and evergreen/conifer (needles, cones, most but not all keep their "leaves" during winter). The differences are botanical and it's been too long since I studied this for me to explain them. But one more example is the bald cypress, which is a conifer, but loses its "leaves" (needles) in winter, thus the name.
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Old 07-03-2019, 12:39 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
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Some varieties of plumeria will drop their leaves in 'winter' although it doesn't get cold around here. I suspect it must have more to do with length of day than temperature. There's a low-chill peach in the front yard here which drops its leaves in winter. Not sure why, it's one of the only trees around here - other than the plumeria - that does. We're probably 11B on a climate zone chart.
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Old 07-03-2019, 02:07 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
Some varieties of plumeria will drop their leaves in 'winter' although it doesn't get cold around here. I suspect it must have more to do with length of day than temperature. There's a low-chill peach in the front yard here which drops its leaves in winter. Not sure why, it's one of the only trees around here - other than the plumeria - that does. We're probably 11B on a climate zone chart.
You can't change the biology of a tree because it's planted where winters are warm. Peach trees and other stone fruit trees will always drop their leaves in winter even for a brief time. It's the only thing the plant can do in order to grow and survive. It's part of it's life cycle.
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Old 07-03-2019, 02:11 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
25,382 posts, read 16,340,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turf3 View Post
Deciduous trees will grow as far south in the US as you want them to. As well as all the way to the equator. The trees of the Amazon rain forest are deciduous trees, many of them. Just because a tree is growing somewhere so hot that it doesn't drop its leaves doesn't make it not deciduous, it just makes it a deciduous tree in a climate where it doesn't drop its leaves. For example, all through the southern USA, live oaks retain their leaves year-round. But that doesn't make them conifers. The same species, growing up North, will lose its leaves in winter.


The two main divisions of trees are deciduous (broad leaves, seeds, most but not all lose their leaves in winter) and evergreen/conifer (needles, cones, most but not all keep their "leaves" during winter). The differences are botanical and it's been too long since I studied this for me to explain them. But one more example is the bald cypress, which is a conifer, but loses its "leaves" (needles) in winter, thus the name.
Good explanation.
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Old 07-04-2019, 07:32 AM
 
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I suggest you study and become familiar with the hardiness zone maps. (Below)

At this time I only plant plants and trees which are indigenous to my area. I have tried and failed over my 50 years of gardening to try to get plants from other areas and zones to prosper. While plants out of zone may grow they most likely will not prosper.

In southern NJ I have been focusing on American holly, Pitch pine and Forsythia bushes. All like southern NJ and do very well once established.

I have been doing extensive study of Ilex opaca (American holly) for over 10 years. I collect berries and plant in areas I know they will prosper.

Just want to add I was a Rutgers Master Gardener for 4 years. This ain't my first rodeo.

https://garden.org/nga/zipzone/
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Old 07-09-2019, 09:00 AM
 
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I clicked on this thread wanting to mention Tampa Bay, but it seems like you already figured that out. That region is really interesting as far as the trees and plants go. The landscaping choices there seems evenly split between "normal" US stuff and more tropical plants.
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Old 07-12-2019, 02:01 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
10,493 posts, read 8,510,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NJBoy3 View Post
I suggest you study and become familiar with the hardiness zone maps. (Below)

At this time I only plant plants and trees which are indigenous to my area. I have tried and failed over my 50 years of gardening to try to get plants from other areas and zones to prosper. While plants out of zone may grow they most likely will not prosper.

In southern NJ I have been focusing on American holly, Pitch pine and Forsythia bushes. All like southern NJ and do very well once established.

I have been doing extensive study of Ilex opaca (American holly) for over 10 years. I collect berries and plant in areas I know they will prosper.

Just want to add I was a Rutgers Master Gardener for 4 years. This ain't my first rodeo.

https://garden.org/nga/zipzone/
I'm familiar with the USDA hardiness zone maps. It's just that a real person's opinion or experience on this would be more reliable.
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Old 07-12-2019, 04:39 AM
 
7,046 posts, read 3,245,018 times
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If you look up a species on Wikipedia the distribution map shows right up.


I found that quercus virginiana (southern live oak) goes clear to the southern tip of Fla. Magnolia virginiana grows almost to the southern tip. so I am guessing soil type not temperature governs that list southernmost tip. And so on.
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Old 07-12-2019, 08:59 PM
 
Location: Floribama
15,873 posts, read 32,948,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
I was Google Street viewing Tampa, and I noticed this deciduous tree (whatever it is) seemed to have dropped its leaves in the winter (December):

https://www.google.com/maps/place/26...65071?hl=en-GB

Even Miami had fall foliage in winter (at least here in this street):

https://www.google.com/maps/@26.2670...i6656?hl=en-GB

I wonder which deciduous (or 'autumn foliage') plant species can survive down there (i.e. sweetgums, poplars, acers, etc). Obviously I cannot tell what species these deciduous trees from the street view are, so this got me wondering.
That first pic is a Laurel Oak, although not a very healthy looking one.

Turkey oak is common throughout most of Florida, and they usually turn bright red in autumn. The range map in this link gives you idea how far south they grow.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_laevis
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