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Old 07-06-2019, 10:30 AM
 
2,759 posts, read 1,018,011 times
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Has anyone used the Shrubbler low-flow irrigation system? I'm not sure if it would be described as a drip or a mini-spray type, because they are adjustable to use as either.

I can't find any user reviews on it other than the ones on the manufacturer's web site.


https://www.dripworks.com/shrubblers


Lee Valley Tools sells components and kits


Shrubbler® Drip System - Lee Valley Tools


Any real-world experiences in a home garden?
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Old 07-06-2019, 09:09 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
31,745 posts, read 57,843,757 times
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I have several in my drip system, and the work just fine. They are more like a really small sprinkler head, which is needed to get the low volume water to all the roots around the shrub. Just a drip emitter would only reach one small part of the root system. You can turn it down to a drip level, but the drip emitters are a lot cheaper for that, a bag of 50 1gph is only $12.
Buy and use what’s appropriate for each plant. With some planning it’s an inexpensive way to save water and your time. I have two systems each with a separate timer.
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Old 07-08-2019, 09:55 AM
 
2,759 posts, read 1,018,011 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
I have several in my drip system, and the work just fine. They are more like a really small sprinkler head, which is needed to get the low volume water to all the roots around the shrub. Just a drip emitter would only reach one small part of the root system. You can turn it down to a drip level, but the drip emitters are a lot cheaper for that, a bag of 50 1gph is only $12.
Buy and use what’s appropriate for each plant. With some planning it’s an inexpensive way to save water and your time. I have two systems each with a separate timer.
Thanks so much! That is what I assumed from the descriptions I have read, and it sounds like a good fit for my situation. We recently removed an east-facing porch but kept the roof so that what we now have is a sort of portico planting bed, which means the back 50% of it never even gets any rainfall. Right now there are only a half dozen shrubs in it but the plan this fall and next spring is to put in a few more plus fill in with perennials. So at this stage there are only individual shrubs (rhodies and azaleas) needing watering but eventually the planting will become more dense. I won't use mulch anywhere near the house because of a former horrific experience with artillery fungus.

One reservation I do have is the 5" stake that the shrubblers are on top of, because the soil is rocky clay and often hard to dig into at all, let alone insert a plastic stake which is as likely to hit a rock as not. One seller's description says that the stake can be broken off into a "barb" instead; is the barb for inserting the Shrubbler directly into the water line, or is it just a shorter length stake for ground insertion?

I also wonder if it would be okay to attach the system to the spigot with a quick connect? Because I will occasionally need to use those same hose spigots for things other than the drip/spray watering (washing car, washing down driveway, etc etc) and my hoses all have quick-connect fittings.
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Old 07-08-2019, 12:56 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
31,745 posts, read 57,843,757 times
Reputation: 34335
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
Thanks so much! That is what I assumed from the descriptions I have read, and it sounds like a good fit for my situation. We recently removed an east-facing porch but kept the roof so that what we now have is a sort of portico planting bed, which means the back 50% of it never even gets any rainfall. Right now there are only a half dozen shrubs in it but the plan this fall and next spring is to put in a few more plus fill in with perennials. So at this stage there are only individual shrubs (rhodies and azaleas) needing watering but eventually the planting will become more dense. I won't use mulch anywhere near the house because of a former horrific experience with artillery fungus.

One reservation I do have is the 5" stake that the shrubblers are on top of, because the soil is rocky clay and often hard to dig into at all, let alone insert a plastic stake which is as likely to hit a rock as not. One seller's description says that the stake can be broken off into a "barb" instead; is the barb for inserting the Shrubbler directly into the water line, or is it just a shorter length stake for ground insertion?

I also wonder if it would be okay to attach the system to the spigot with a quick connect? Because I will occasionally need to use those same hose spigots for things other than the drip/spray watering (washing car, washing down driveway, etc etc) and my hoses all have quick-connect fittings.
Don't break off the barb. Use a spike, or sharp stick to make the hole first, then insert the stake. If you hit a rock try an inch or so over. The "barb" is to connect directly to 1/2" tubing. You could also use that if you had your own stakes, perhaps metal and then use zip-ties to attach the hose to the metal stake.
Quick connects are fine as long as you have a filter in the line, at least a screen. I use a brass two-way splitter on my faucets, with a hose on one and the drip timer on the other. If you are only watering once a week or so you don't need a timer but they are pretty cheap and easy to use.






Last edited by Hemlock140; 07-08-2019 at 01:05 PM..
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Old 07-08-2019, 05:52 PM
 
2,759 posts, read 1,018,011 times
Reputation: 4904
Thanks yet again.

I'm seriously thinking of getting this Shrubbler kit from Lee Valley Tools. They do have an in-line filter as part of the package, and I do have a brass splitter somewhere in my bag of tricks already. :-)

Shrubbler® Drip System - Lee Valley Tools

I've been looking for an excuse to buy a Sneeboer or DeWit dibbler, and those spike/stakes might just provide one, come to think of it, LOL
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