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Old 07-06-2019, 03:56 PM
 
Location: 49th parallel
3,000 posts, read 1,605,689 times
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I have a lilac that was planted too close to the evergreen border of huge trees on our lot by the former owner, and now, 10 years later, it has been completely overgrown by said cedars and firs.

I would like to move it out into the sun (it's about 8-9 feet tall) and when we got in there to peek at it last week we discovered some leaf curl on it. Does that mean it is a goner and wouldn't be worth moving? Or is there an easy solution? Or will the leaf curl disappear when it gets out into the sun?
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Old 07-06-2019, 04:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcairngorm View Post
I have a lilac that was planted too close to the evergreen border of huge trees on our lot by the former owner, and now, 10 years later, it has been completely overgrown by said cedars and firs.

I would like to move it out into the sun (it's about 8-9 feet tall) and when we got in there to peek at it last week we discovered some leaf curl on it. Does that mean it is a goner and wouldn't be worth moving? Or is there an easy solution? Or will the leaf curl disappear when it gets out into the sun?
They need sun so if it’s blocked and not getting enough sun and airflow then I would recommend moving it.
That being the case, they are not that resistant to being transplanted but if it’s in a difficult spot to survive long term, you have little choice.

Also, I assume it’s been getting enough water?

Last edited by Rickcin; 07-06-2019 at 05:11 PM..
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Old 07-06-2019, 04:23 PM
 
Location: 49th parallel
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No, probably not getting enough, because it's under all those big trees which are probably sucking up all the water. As well as cutting off all the sunlight!
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Old 07-06-2019, 05:25 PM
 
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https://www.almanac.com/plant/lilacs

It seems that even if the whole bush doesn't survive, a sucker or two could.
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Old 07-06-2019, 06:01 PM
 
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If the leaf curl has been caused by powdery mildew, that should improve once the bush is moved away from the cedars and firs, as it will have better air circulation and sunlight then.
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Old 07-07-2019, 09:34 AM
 
Location: 49th parallel
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Thanks, everyone. I'm going to give it a try once the weather cools off.
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Old 07-07-2019, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Olympia area (for now)
1,910 posts, read 743,708 times
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Your lilac should survive fine. I found a lilac at edge of the property that was around seven feet tall. It was in a neglected spot full of weeds by the barn and I wanted to move it to a better spot and so dug it up last spring. Allowing plenty of time to dig deep and get some nice roots helped the plant survive. I had a large hole already dug by the fence in front of the house. After planting it, I mixed some compost in with the top soil. I chose a spot that has some afternoon shade since it was growing and blooming in a spot with not much sun. I watered it every day for a week, then gradually tapered off. I was careful to give it a deep soaking every week during the first summer.

This spring it had some pretty blooms and it shares a spot with other blooming shrubs along the fence.
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Old 07-27-2019, 01:08 PM
 
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It is the best of all to replace a lilac in the fall or at the end of summer. The change which at this time was more sparing to a bush is simpler to get accustomed on the new place. If the summer was very hot, it is better to transfer change to the middle of September.
Before change it is necessary to truncate a little bush krone and also to cut off all sick roots. In general the root system of the replaced plant has to make about 30 cm in length.
Before landing on the new place prepare a pole and fertilize the soil. The hole has to be such size that the lilac root together with an earth lump freely in it was located. The lilac is accurately put in a hole, straighten backs and powdered with the earth.
After change especially care of a bush is not required. Rather regularly to loosen the soil near roots, to water and not to allow infections with a fungus. After change the lilac begins to blossom the next year.
https://all-spices.blogspot.com
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