U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-14-2019, 05:13 PM
 
2,977 posts, read 4,100,962 times
Reputation: 3710

Advertisements

I have clover and crabgrass along with some "grass" which is really fescue and bluegrass and other stuff that would look like a prairie if I let it grow all summer long. I mow once a week which keeps my yard looking like the neighbors' although they use feed and weed, and other chemicals.

I just want something to cover the dirt during the non-snow season.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-14-2019, 05:39 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
72,198 posts, read 55,211,335 times
Reputation: 12393
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvmensch View Post
When I was a kid in Louisville KY in the late 40s all the lawns had clover. Never occurred that one should do anything about it. We played barefoot over all the lawns and the clover led to a bee sting weekly. It was so common the kids took care of it themselves. Find and pull the stinger and then slap it with a hunk of dark mud and wait for it to go away.
Yup it was after World War II, fertilizer and herbicide sales to homeowners became a big market sector for chemical companies. Advertisements touting the virtues of perfect carpets of grass monoculture changed our standards. So when they discovered that the new herbicides also killed clover, clover became a weed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2019, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
1,413 posts, read 741,430 times
Reputation: 3515
Clover, violets, creeping charlie...I've decided to think of all of it as lawn.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2019, 06:10 PM
 
Location: Lone Mountain Las Vegas NV
14,892 posts, read 5,892,887 times
Reputation: 6889
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
Clover, violets, creeping charlie...I've decided to think of all of it as lawn.
Not sure I should be in this discussion. I have spent a good bit of money to keep the bermuda out of my fancy front lawn...and both of the back lawns are Bermuda. But the front is a heavily shaded plot and we want it looking good all winter.

In the last house in California I spent half a grand...and this was 25 years ago...to keep the bermuda out of our perennial strawberry patch. And that one worked though the patch was covered in heavy black plastic for 90 days.

So I am clearly not a purist.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2019, 06:28 PM
 
1,704 posts, read 518,189 times
Reputation: 3991
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Apparently, it is bad gardening to have patches of clover in your lawn. Who knew? I occasionally get a neighbor advise me to use some feed and weed to get rid of the clover.


Sorry, you don't like looking at it, neighbor, but we are honey bee friendly at my house.


I don't mind looking at large stretches of flowers and I have one patch I particularly like that has lovely pink flowers. The bees are grateful for all the clover and work it diligently.


I mow in the evening when it appears that bees have either gone to bed or on to feed on something else. I don't want to mow the bees.
In the past 10-20% of clover was a standard part of turf grass seeds mixes.
Established clover makes friends with a specific bacteria in the soil and together they produce nitrogen, which grass needs to be healthy.
Marketing people convinced homeowners that clover is a weed and needs to be eliminated with the help of a broadleaf herbicides they sell.
After the clover was killed in lawn- now nitrogen depleted grass needed somebody to supply that nitrogen...
Very conveniently, who “ saved the day” and supplied chemical fertilizers?
The same people who told homeowners to kill clover according to a “ progress” in lawn science.
Double whammy for homeowners- double the profit for the greedy companies!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2019, 08:17 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
1,413 posts, read 741,430 times
Reputation: 3515
Quote:
Originally Posted by lvmensch View Post
Not sure I should be in this discussion. I have spent a good bit of money to keep the bermuda out of my fancy front lawn...and both of the back lawns are Bermuda. But the front is a heavily shaded plot and we want it looking good all winter.

In the last house in California I spent half a grand...and this was 25 years ago...to keep the bermuda out of our perennial strawberry patch. And that one worked though the patch was covered in heavy black plastic for 90 days.

So I am clearly not a purist.
I paid a guy $20 to mow a few weeks ago when I didn't feel like it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2019, 09:34 PM
 
1,235 posts, read 392,553 times
Reputation: 4269
It's not the clover so much that irritates me, it's that dad-gummed crimson, especially when they grow together, over and over.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-14-2019, 10:15 PM
 
3,950 posts, read 1,735,653 times
Reputation: 8064
The man across the street used to complain that he no longer planted a vegetable garden because there were no bees to pollinate it. He asked if we had any bees. Considering the amount of my "lawn" that's clover, we are rich with bees. I have a honeysuckle on the edge of the property, too, and they like that, too.

My neighbor who has a lawn service come in and mow and poison has some grass and some dirt patches in the off seasons while we have weeds all year long. I prefer them to dirt patches.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2019, 07:51 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
10,626 posts, read 11,611,562 times
Reputation: 14884
I'm a bit of a lawn nut, and have one of the thickest, nicest lawns in my neighborhood, but I tend to draw a line at chemicals and additional watering beyond rain. All I really do is aerate and overseed every fall to thicken it up. I'm getting sick of having to mow it twice a week just to keep up with it.

But I have "weeds" Clover is one of them. I have some violet as well, and a few other types that I don't know the name of.

Crabgrass is the only one I really try and eliminate, and it's so few that I just handpull it. But clover in the lawn doesn't bug me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-15-2019, 08:50 AM
 
2,759 posts, read 1,018,011 times
Reputation: 4904
At least clover stays green during the hottest driest months.

I don't mind clover or violets, in fact I love the violets. At my last house I had a neighbor who saw lawn violets as the scourge of her existence and probably hated that I didn't control mine. If I had a yard that was 50% grass, 25% clover and 25% violets I wouldn't mind at all.

However.... right now I am dealing with A Situation that is going to require about two years of chemical remediation due to a large excavationi and regrading project having been done with topsoil that was - unbeknownst to me - loaded with weed seeds. The landscape contractor's attitude as a result was "If you wanted a weed-free lawn you should have gone for sod." The crabgrass, Johnson grass, nutsedge, plaintain, ragweed, dandelion, and at least a dozen other weeds (not even counting the clover or violets) have made such a thick ragged carpet that even right after mowing it looks horrible. It can't even be overseeded at this stage. Hopefully next autumn, after a year and a half of weed control. I will be sorry to lose the clover and violets through collateral damage but I have a feeling they'll eventually be back.

Another downside to having a weed-thick lawn is that it's much harder to spot and eradicate the poison ivy seedlings that repeatedly pop up in it. My area is Poison Ivy Country and although I can keep zapping any that I find in my own yard, I can't do anything about any laissez-faire neighbors who aren't as conscientious and the Town/County owned greenbelt where it is simply allowed to grow unchecked.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:24 AM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top