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Old 07-15-2019, 09:10 AM
 
Location: Floribama
15,885 posts, read 32,993,297 times
Reputation: 15179

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
At least clover stays green during the hottest driest months.

I don't mind clover or violets, in fact I love the violets. At my last house I had a neighbor who saw lawn violets as the scourge of her existence and probably hated that I didn't control mine. If I had a yard that was 50% grass, 25% clover and 25% violets I wouldn't mind at all.

However.... right now I am dealing with A Situation that is going to require about two years of chemical remediation due to a large excavationi and regrading project having been done with topsoil that was - unbeknownst to me - loaded with weed seeds. The landscape contractor's attitude as a result was "If you wanted a weed-free lawn you should have gone for sod." The crabgrass, Johnson grass, nutsedge, plaintain, ragweed, dandelion, and at least a dozen other weeds (not even counting the clover or violets) have made such a thick ragged carpet that even right after mowing it looks horrible. It can't even be overseeded at this stage. Hopefully next autumn, after a year and a half of weed control. I will be sorry to lose the clover and violets through collateral damage but I have a feeling they'll eventually be back.

Another downside to having a weed-thick lawn is that it's much harder to spot and eradicate the poison ivy seedlings that repeatedly pop up in it. My area is Poison Ivy Country and although I can keep zapping any that I find in my own yard, I can't do anything about any laissez-faire neighbors who aren't as conscientious and the Town/County owned greenbelt where it is simply allowed to grow unchecked.
That puzzles me, because here on the gulf coast clover is a late winter/early spring “weed”. It grows lush and thick as long as it’s cool, but the summer heat makes it die off.
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:13 AM
 
Location: Massachusetts
10,626 posts, read 11,611,562 times
Reputation: 14884
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
That puzzles me, because here on the gulf coast clover is a late winter/early spring “weed”. It grows lush and thick as long as it’s cool, but the summer heat makes it die off.
Perhaps it's a different type of clover, but up here in the northeast, it's really starting to take off. In between mows, I can see the white clover flowers in my lawn, and it's all bright green, as opposed to the areas of my lawn going dormant from the 90 degree heat we are seeing now.

Most common plant I am handpulling from my mulch beds now is clover. Seems like the last month it's begun germinating and growing well.
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:43 AM
 
1,704 posts, read 518,189 times
Reputation: 3991
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
At least clover stays green during the hottest driest months.

I don't mind clover or violets, in fact I love the violets. At my last house I had a neighbor who saw lawn violets as the scourge of her existence and probably hated that I didn't control mine. If I had a yard that was 50% grass, 25% clover and 25% violets I wouldn't mind at all.

However.... right now I am dealing with A Situation that is going to require about two years of chemical remediation due to a large excavationi and regrading project having been done with topsoil that was - unbeknownst to me - loaded with weed seeds. The landscape contractor's attitude as a result was "If you wanted a weed-free lawn you should have gone for sod." The crabgrass, Johnson grass, nutsedge, plaintain, ragweed, dandelion, and at least a dozen other weeds (not even counting the clover or violets) have made such a thick ragged carpet that even right after mowing it looks horrible. It can't even be overseeded at this stage. Hopefully next autumn, after a year and a half of weed control. I will be sorry to lose the clover and violets through collateral damage but I have a feeling they'll eventually be back.

Another downside to having a weed-thick lawn is that it's much harder to spot and eradicate the poison ivy seedlings that repeatedly pop up in it. My area is Poison Ivy Country and although I can keep zapping any that I find in my own yard, I can't do anything about any laissez-faire neighbors who aren't as conscientious and the Town/County owned greenbelt where it is simply allowed to grow unchecked.
You might want to kill all of your lawn
1) Glyphosate-41% -kills everything, wait 7 days, put sod or seeds. Check your soil pH first - you may need to lime- depending where you are.
Or
2) keep cutting very short- poison ivy should be sprayed right away- don touch your lawn mower- oil still could be there, keep over-seeding spring and fall with premium seeds mix for your area of the country.
You can buy clover seeds and add to your lawn.
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:45 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, Hilly South, Land of Doors
1,596 posts, read 827,285 times
Reputation: 2025
Quote:
Originally Posted by NSHL10 View Post
And that is part of why bees are dying off and we have such high rates of cancer. Perfectly manicured lawns using toxic to us chemicals.

I love my clover and crab grass lawn. No muss no fuss and inexpensive to maintain.
Love this answer. Exactly.
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Old 07-15-2019, 09:54 AM
 
Location: Floribama
15,885 posts, read 32,993,297 times
Reputation: 15179
Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonMike7 View Post
Perhaps it's a different type of clover, but up here in the northeast, it's really starting to take off. In between mows, I can see the white clover flowers in my lawn, and it's all bright green, as opposed to the areas of my lawn going dormant from the 90 degree heat we are seeing now.

Most common plant I am handpulling from my mulch beds now is clover. Seems like the last month it's begun germinating and growing well.
It may be the difference between the types of grasses. I have Centipede and St Augustine which doesn’t get nice and thick until the high temperatures get into the 80s. It could be that the grass just outcompetes the clover later in the summer.
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Old 07-15-2019, 11:09 AM
 
8,296 posts, read 4,422,900 times
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I love the clover in my back lawn--except when I forget and walk across it in bare feet! Ouch!
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Old 07-15-2019, 11:59 AM
 
2,759 posts, read 1,018,011 times
Reputation: 4904
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik4me View Post
You might want to kill all of your lawn
1) Glyphosate-41% -kills everything, wait 7 days, put sod or seeds. Check your soil pH first - you may need to lime- depending where you are.
Or
2) keep cutting very short- poison ivy should be sprayed right away- don touch your lawn mower- oil still could be there, keep over-seeding spring and fall with premium seeds mix for your area of the country.
You can buy clover seeds and add to your lawn.
I may need to do that next year depending on what the situation is by this fall. I just signed with a lawn renovation service that is going to do four treatments (plus lime) between now and October.

A different service just does weekly lawn cuts so I don't worry about touching mower blades but I do worry that the "snips" are being spread over the general area where the P.I. seedlings may be. I do literally 'watch where I walk" and spray any immediately (I do a property-wide Poison Ivy Patrol weekly from May through early November, it's a half acre of mixed grass and planting beds and hardscape) when I see them. Also battling invasive vines (bittersweet, solanum, wild blackberry, catbrier) which get the same zapping with a triple-strength poison ivy and brush killer spray. But I even see those miserable PI seedlings popping up in cracks between patio pavers!!

Whenever I do anything in any soil here, I use a double layer of hand protection: disposable vinyl glove with a premium grade disposable latex glove over it. Urushiol can penetrate latex but cannot penetrate vinyl or plastic. The outer latex glove is to minimize risk of the vinyl glove accidentally splitting or having a pinhole in it. Also have a LARGE bottle of Tecnu always on hand. I have learned to assume that even if I haven't seen P.I. in a given spot yet, that doesn't mean that either dead or new roots aren't lurking - and both are equally toxic.

What I worry most about it urushiol on the soles of shoes just from walking in the yard and contacting any bit of poison ivy, even mowed bits, because as we all know, all parts remain toxic for several years after death. So the oil can easily get tracked into the garage, the house, the car, whatever -- unless a no-out-door-shoes-inside rule is in place. I am always surprised that no poison-ivy advice ever seems to address this.
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Old 07-15-2019, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
10,320 posts, read 19,762,321 times
Reputation: 9512
Well, no poison ivy here, but no winters off, either. We have mint running around in the lawn, not much clover, though. But, nobody around here cares about lawns anyway. I suppose if they were seasonal, folks would care, but can you imagine trying to keep a perfect lawn all year long? When would there be time to go to the beach?
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Old 07-15-2019, 02:56 PM
 
1,704 posts, read 518,189 times
Reputation: 3991
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
I may need to do that next year depending on what the situation is by this fall. I just signed with a lawn renovation service that is going to do four treatments (plus lime) between now and October.

A different service just does weekly lawn cuts so I don't worry about touching mower blades but I do worry that the "snips" are being spread over the general area where the P.I. seedlings may be. I do literally 'watch where I walk" and spray any immediately (I do a property-wide Poison Ivy Patrol weekly from May through early November, it's a half acre of mixed grass and planting beds and hardscape) when I see them. Also battling invasive vines (bittersweet, solanum, wild blackberry, catbrier) which get the same zapping with a triple-strength poison ivy and brush killer spray. But I even see those miserable PI seedlings popping up in cracks between patio pavers!!

Whenever I do anything in any soil here, I use a double layer of hand protection: disposable vinyl glove with a premium grade disposable latex glove over it. Urushiol can penetrate latex but cannot penetrate vinyl or plastic. The outer latex glove is to minimize risk of the vinyl glove accidentally splitting or having a pinhole in it. Also have a LARGE bottle of Tecnu always on hand. I have learned to assume that even if I haven't seen P.I. in a given spot yet, that doesn't mean that either dead or new roots aren't lurking - and both are equally toxic.

What I worry most about it urushiol on the soles of shoes just from walking in the yard and contacting any bit of poison ivy, even mowed bits, because as we all know, all parts remain toxic for several years after death. So the oil can easily get tracked into the garage, the house, the car, whatever -- unless a no-out-door-shoes-inside rule is in place. I am always surprised that no poison-ivy advice ever seems to address this.
You have your hands full!you have my compassion regarding ivy.
Definitely have backyard only shoes- keep them on a boot tray in the shed? Change there very carefully?
Do you happen to feed birds? The types of invasive you have mentioned is usually spread by wild birds. They love poison ivy berries and they spread them around.
I would stop feeding them and even try to exclude them with scare crows, balloons, mobiles made from old cds swinging in the wind.
You have to switch those bird deterrent around, so the birds won’t get used to them.
It might help
Right now you seem can’t use your nicely landscaped yard and have to spend money for lawn care.
Don’t lime your soil. Ivy prefers soils rich in calcium. There are grasses that tolerate acidic (low pH ) soils. Determine what is best for your geography
https://www.oared.ohio-state.edu/wee...eed.php?id=113
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Old 07-15-2019, 03:22 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
8,728 posts, read 7,460,254 times
Reputation: 18144
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
Clover, violets, creeping charlie...I've decided to think of all of it as lawn.

Likewise. It's all good, it mows down nicely and grows back just as nicely, and the bees love it. I think the tiny blue creeping charlie flowers are so cute.
.
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