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Old 07-15-2019, 04:15 PM
 
4,997 posts, read 2,269,294 times
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"It's not the clover so much that irritates me, it's that dad-gummed crimson, especially when they grow together, over and over."

old song.
"Crimson and clover, over and over."
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Old 07-15-2019, 04:21 PM
 
Location: Minnesota
2,273 posts, read 1,061,863 times
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I saw a report on TV a month or more ago that someone is developing a mini clover to use as ground cover to replace grass. Only needs to be moved twice a season, drought tolerant. I would switch to that in a moment.
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Old 07-15-2019, 07:34 PM
 
1,681 posts, read 2,094,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post


Sorry, you don't like looking at it, neighbor, but we are honey bee friendly at my house.

I mow in the evening when it appears that bees have either gone to bed or on to feed on something else. I don't want to mow the bees.
Amen to that woodsmoke...

Clover seems rampant this year in both my lawn and the rest of the neighborhood. I have to push the mower very slowly so not to run over and grind up bees collecting pollen on clover buds (dragonflies too).

The dragonflies get out of Dodge quick when a power mower heads their way, the Bees don't move, or simply fly to another bud a few feet ahead. I quite literally have to "bump" them with the front of the mower...

I need a mower with a "bee horn".... And one for New York Bees....

"Hey" Get Outta The Way, I'm Mowin Hea!!!....
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Old 07-16-2019, 06:06 AM
 
2,699 posts, read 993,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik4me View Post
Definitely have backyard only shoes- keep them on a boot tray in the shed? Change there very carefully?
Do you happen to feed birds? The types of invasive you have mentioned is usually spread by wild birds.

I do have two pair of 'gardening shoes' (one waterproof for when things are wet or mucky, and the other pair is just sneakers) that I keep on a dedicated shelf in the garage but the garage is also the usual entrance to the house as well so it's not a 100% preventive.

Nope, no bird feeders here but my next door neighbor puts them out during the winter. That's the same neighbor who has a thick band of English Ivy surrounding the perimenter of his property, and I know there are poison ivy plants mixed in with that bigtime. They keep chickens that forage around the property and so they don't spray, as least not in the English ivy/poison ivy section.

I live in suburbia but the other invasives (bittersweet, blackberry, etc) are common everywhere here except for within ultra-manicured yards. Even then it's not uncommon for bittersweet to be lurking because the homeowner doesn't realize what it is. Another adjacent neighbor has several large bittersweet that have invaded the 100-foot yew hedge that runs along our shared propertyline fence; I cut what I can reach but the trunks are a good 8 feet from the fence and so a surreptitious spraying couldn't reach it. They have a lawn service that cuts and does spring and fall cleanups but doesn't remove any of the invasive vines.
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Old 07-16-2019, 06:20 AM
 
2,699 posts, read 993,166 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Izzie1213 View Post
I saw a report on TV a month or more ago that someone is developing a mini clover to use as ground cover to replace grass. Only needs to be moved twice a season, drought tolerant. I would switch to that in a moment.
Yes, micro-clover. Here's a good web page on it, explaining the advantages and disadvantages of a clover lawn:

https://dengarden.com/gardening/Clover-Lawns

Some highlights:

White clover grows just 2-8 inches tall and requires little or no mowing to keep it looking tidy. However, some homeowners may prefer to mow in midsummer in order to deadhead old blooms, neaten the appearance of the lawn, or to prevent from blooming.

It has a dense root structure that allows it to easily out-compete most other weeds and reduce the need for weeding and expensive herbicides.

It tolerates a wide variety of soil conditions, including the poor-quality subsoil common around many new homes.

Clover seed is extremely inexpensive. The average cost is about $4 per 4000 square feet. Homeowners who have been fighting it as a weed get it for free if they decide to stop fighting and let it grow.

It stains clothing more easily than grass.

It is not durable enough for high traffic areas, unless mixed with grass.

It is a short lived perennial and may require reseedign every 2-3 years to maintain an even stand in pure clover lawns.

It prefers full sun. It will grow in light shade, but less quickly. It won't grow well in full shade.

Clover is one of bees' favorite flowers and it makes a delicious honey. However, many homeowners are wary of planting a clover lawn because they are afraid of bee stings. It is possible to have a clover lawn without bees. If you are allergic to bees or have young children, you can discourage them by mowing regularly during the summer blooming season to prevent flowers.

But keep in mind, depending on where you live, certain homeowners associations (HOA) may not allow a pure clover lawn, because *technically* clover is classified as a weed.

In general, clover is hardy to very low temperatures, but may not fight off weeds as aggressively in areas with very cold winters and cool springs.

One topic that was not addressed was how to remove weeds from a clover lawn. Obviously any herbicide that will kill weeds would also kill the clover. I suppose one would need to dig out all weeds by hand. That could turn out to be quite a daunting prospect!
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Old 07-16-2019, 06:25 AM
 
2,704 posts, read 931,793 times
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Originally Posted by BostonMike7 View Post
I'm a bit of a lawn nut, and have one of the thickest, nicest lawns in my neighborhood, but I tend to draw a line at chemicals and additional watering beyond rain. All I really do is aerate and overseed every fall to thicken it up. I'm getting sick of having to mow it twice a week just to keep up with it.

But I have "weeds" Clover is one of them. I have some violet as well, and a few other types that I don't know the name of.

Crabgrass is the only one I really try and eliminate, and it's so few that I just handpull it. But clover in the lawn doesn't bug me.
Clover normally occurs when the soil is very compacted and less organic so whenever I aerate and overseen, as you have mentioned, I spread some compost on the lawn and it will slowly make it more organic.

I also only use organic fertilizer like Milogranite and if the soil improves, so will your lawn, without chemicals!
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Old 07-16-2019, 11:38 AM
 
2,795 posts, read 1,527,889 times
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I haven't had a lawn in 40 years, just deck, and gravel paths between native plants. If I did have a lawn, I'd add micro-clover to it for sure, because honeybees are important, and people are ignoring that fact more and more. They care more about killing their weeds with chemicals than they care about honeybees. It's disastrous.
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