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Old 07-15-2019, 04:14 PM
 
Location: The Mitten
821 posts, read 1,157,708 times
Reputation: 695

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My next potential garden area is behind my shed. The distance between the fence and my shed is around six to eight feet of space, quite a bit to plant wildflowers and sunflowers. This is a potential dream of mine for next year but there is a lot of work to be done. There is a lot of work to be done before the end of the year. Both sides has a lot of grapevine overgrowth; one side has a stick pile that goes up to my waste.

This morning I took a look at what was back there. I seen an orange "trumpet" or "bell" type flower, and a yellow "daisy-like" flower. The yellow flower was too small to be actual daisies, but looked OK. My week spot to not just mow the area down? Bees! The yellow flower had a swarm of honey bees going after the pollen. I want to cut the whole thing down, mow it over with my lawnmower, but with those flowers, I wish I could transfer them. Has anybody had any luck with transferring wildflowers?

Secondly, the grapevines, which seem to be a tremendous hassle to remove, other then spraying pure acid on them. What's the best way of ridding my lawn of grapevines? They're every where! My front yard now has some vines coming up around the tree. I have to yank them, find the stem and cut it down to the base! I don't mind the weeds so much, is the vines or grape vines that don't show themselves until they're wrapped around the tree.
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Old 07-18-2019, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
27,392 posts, read 25,965,377 times
Reputation: 34319
Maybe brush and shrub killer. Things like blackberry and grape vines are very difficult to kill. I'd reduce them in height, damage the bark, and apply an appropriate product.

You certainly have your work cut out for you.
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Old 07-18-2019, 09:36 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
8,723 posts, read 7,456,027 times
Reputation: 18139
If you were on a bit of acreage with no close neighbours I'd suggest you rent some goats or pigs to take care of killing the grape vines for you. The goats would eat the foliage (yummy stuff) and the pigs would tear up the roots to get at the tenderest roots. I'm guessing that's out of the question for you though. Good luck with the grape vines whatever you do.
.
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Old 07-19-2019, 07:58 AM
 
7,119 posts, read 8,718,374 times
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If you're dealing with a small area, just cut out the grapevines by hand. Wait until late fall to clear out the rest of the area, after the wildflowers have gone to seed. You could mow the area then. If you have trumpet vine, I'd do everything possible to try to save it. Those are great for attracting hummingbirds.
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Old 07-19-2019, 08:30 AM
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
11,644 posts, read 15,290,087 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitopcat View Post
I wish I could transfer them. Has anybody had any luck with transferring wildflowers?
Many moons ago I used to transplant wildflowers from our woods and fields into a section of our garden my dad gave me to use for my own. I was a kid, with no concept of sun/shade tolerance, and I had mixed success, but overall most of the transplants did pretty well in their new home.
If you really like them I think it would be worthwhile to try to move them. At worst you might waste a bit of time and effort since they're headed for a mowing anyway.
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Old 07-19-2019, 10:25 AM
 
2,758 posts, read 1,015,844 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
Maybe brush and shrub killer. Things like blackberry and grape vines are very difficult to kill. I'd reduce them in height, damage the bark, and apply an appropriate product.

Also, for grapevine or blackberry I wouldn't waste time with the ready-to-use brush/shrub killer; buy the concentrate instead.

The concentrate's instructions typically give two or three mixing ratios according to the performance desired (Good, Better, Best.) For example the brand I use specifies 2 oz of concentrate per gallon of water for "average" control, 4 oz per gallon for "better" effectiveness, and 6 oz per gallon for "best results." The ready-to use stuff is usually mixed at the "average" ratio but when you are dealing with really tough customers like blackberry, multiflora rose, or grapevine you really do need the higher concentrations to get the best results in the shortest possible time.

I mix my brush killer at between 6 and 8 oz per gallon of water depending on what I'm trying to eradicate. That ratio WORKS, with no follow-up application needed.
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Old 07-19-2019, 11:54 AM
 
2,820 posts, read 1,543,114 times
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I've dug out grapevines before. Once you dig the big roots out, you're good to go. It just takes some muscle, and it's good exercise for you.


You don't have to use chemicals in your garden to remove things you don't want. Use a shovel instead.
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Old 07-19-2019, 12:30 PM
 
7,119 posts, read 8,718,374 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
You don't have to use chemicals in your garden to remove things you don't want. Use a shovel instead.
Yep. Why poison everything when you don't need to?
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Old 07-19-2019, 01:28 PM
 
2,758 posts, read 1,015,844 times
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Depends on one's physical ability. There's no way I'd be able to dig out a grapevine, especially if it was growing in the miserable rocky clay common where I am. Maybe I could have done it when I was in my 50s but I have way too many back, arm, and leg issues to even think of attempting something like that now. I have learned my limitations via painful experience, LOL

Not everyone has family members with the time or inclination to do stuff like that either, and the days of "paying some neighborhood kid to do it" went bye-bye in this area a couple of decades ago. So it usually ends up being a choice between paying some landscape guy at $100 an hour (IF they will even agree to do such a small job; most won't) or buying a bottle of brush killer concentrate for $18 at Home Depot and spraying the stuff. Guess which one I can much better afford to do.
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Old 07-19-2019, 01:58 PM
 
9,062 posts, read 3,340,676 times
Reputation: 20715
Quote:
Originally Posted by mitopcat View Post
My next potential garden area is behind my shed. The distance between the fence and my shed is around six to eight feet of space, quite a bit to plant wildflowers and sunflowers. This is a potential dream of mine for next year but there is a lot of work to be done. There is a lot of work to be done before the end of the year. Both sides has a lot of grapevine overgrowth; one side has a stick pile that goes up to my waste.

This morning I took a look at what was back there. I seen an orange "trumpet" or "bell" type flower, and a yellow "daisy-like" flower. The yellow flower was too small to be actual daisies, but looked OK. My week spot to not just mow the area down? Bees! The yellow flower had a swarm of honey bees going after the pollen. I want to cut the whole thing down, mow it over with my lawnmower, but with those flowers, I wish I could transfer them. Has anybody had any luck with transferring wildflowers?

Secondly, the grapevines, which seem to be a tremendous hassle to remove, other then spraying pure acid on them. What's the best way of ridding my lawn of grapevines? They're every where! My front yard now has some vines coming up around the tree. I have to yank them, find the stem and cut it down to the base! I don't mind the weeds so much, is the vines or grape vines that don't show themselves until they're wrapped around the tree.

Do you think the yellow flowers might be Black eyed susans?
https://www.amazon.com/Perennial-Mar...a-786571963348


I think, technically, they're not perennials, but they drop their seeds, and grow back fairly easily. If you like the flowers, and if it were me, I'd wait til the flowers go to seed, collect the seeds, and THEN mow stuff down.
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