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Old 07-21-2019, 02:32 PM
 
40 posts, read 10,213 times
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I planted these hostas a month or so ago. They don't look too bad, but they're on the south side of the building. There's a big tree over there that provides some shade, but these do get several hours of direct late morning/early afternoon sun-and I haven't watered them as much as I probably should. Could this be caused by too much sun and not enough moisture?
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Old 07-21-2019, 02:44 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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They are actually pretty drought tolerant, it’s the sun that caused that. Mine are thriving in full shade, and never see the sun, and I water once a week or 10 days. They are easy to transplant, if you have a better spot, even this time of year as long as you water them in well.
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Old 07-21-2019, 02:57 PM
 
Location: LI,NY zone 7a
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Hostas are pretty hardy, but looking where you have them planted is causing a lot of stress. By that I mean they are very close to the fondation, which will throw a lot of heat back at your plants. I would recommend at least two inches of mulch to keep the plants feet a little cooler, while holding the ground moisture a little longer.
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Old 07-21-2019, 11:22 PM
 
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I did a little research online, and mulch seemed to be the popular solution-so I went to Menard's and bought a couple bags of it. It isn't 2 inches deep like the recommendations I saw, but it's enough to cover the ground around them and keep moisture in. (We had a pretty nasty thunderstorm Saturday morning, and the ground is still somewhat soft.) And it's wood chip mulch, so it smells good too.
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Old 07-22-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
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The ones in my backyard and are well shaded are great. The ones in my front yard started out great until the Alabama sun got too hot. They are large but the edges of all the leaves are burning now. I'll be digging them up in the fall and moving them.
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Old 07-22-2019, 10:50 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Birds Fan View Post
I did a little research online, and mulch seemed to be the popular solution-so I went to Menard's and bought a couple bags of it. It isn't 2 inches deep like the recommendations I saw, but it's enough to cover the ground around them and keep moisture in. (We had a pretty nasty thunderstorm Saturday morning, and the ground is still somewhat soft.) And it's wood chip mulch, so it smells good too.

Your hostas are scorched from getting way too much direct sunlight and radiant heat on the leaves for too many hours each day, and I doubt they will survive there. Putting mulch down is a good idea but keeping moisture in the ground will not prevent hosta leaves from getting scorched from too much exposure to direct sun. So if you find that the leaves continue to be getting scorched and if you want to save those hostas from dying you will have to take them up and transplant them to somewhere shady. They should recover by early next spring if you transplant them very soon now while they are still growing, before they go dormant for winter. Find some other kinds of plants for the present location that are tolerant of the amount of sun and heat that location is getting.


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