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Old 07-26-2019, 05:22 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Their leaves look similar to those of Jacaranda mimosifolia. They are deciduous, since their leaves fall in the winter months (on street view at least). Not that it helps, but this is a street in Sydney. Here in Australia, we don't have native deciduous trees, at least not in the mainland. So it isn't a native tree for sure.

https://www.google.com/maps/@-33.884...i6656?hl=en-GB

There are three of them in view. I zoomed into the larger specimen. Not sure if the quality is the best for determining what species it is.
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Old 07-26-2019, 08:04 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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I did some research.

Could it be Robinia pseudoacacia?
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Old 07-26-2019, 09:11 AM
 
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The acacia is known for the beauty and a variety of types. It grows on each continent and is widely used in medicine.
Robinia viscosa is the tree reaching in height of 12 meters. Diameter of a trunk at this plant small — within 35 cm.
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Old 07-26-2019, 11:43 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
I did some research.

Could it be Robinia pseudoacacia?

Have you ever actually examined those trees close up and in person, or have you only seen them on google street view? There are numerous species of deciduous trees that have leaves similar or the same as that so it's often hard to ID them by their leaves alone through indistinct street views unless they also show close up views of the seasonal flowers and then the seasonal fruits or seed pods.

I think if you want to get a more accurate online ID on those trees you will need to be able to show close up seasonal pictures of the flowers, fruits, seed pods/seeds, individual leaves, bark and any spines or thorns or other distinctive protrusions/growths that might be on the trees.

I looked at those trees and I know what they look like to me but I also know that the trees I'm thinking of would most likely not ever be able to survive in Sydney's climate and would be a waste of time and money to try, so they're probably not what they look like to me. I really would need to see close ups of the flowers and fruits at the very least.

I can tell you that it's not Jacaranda mimosifolia. The leaves on those 3 trees pictured are WAY, way too big for that, and the growth habit of the trunk and branches is not the same as Jacaranda mimosifolia.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 07-26-2019 at 11:52 AM..
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Old 07-26-2019, 12:28 PM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
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They look like locust trees from streetview.
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Old 07-26-2019, 09:06 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by B87 View Post
They look like locust trees from streetview.
I would agree. I have a Honey Locust and the leaves are exactly like those. In late spring it gets bunches of white trailing flowers then bean-like seed pods.
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Old 07-27-2019, 12:26 AM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
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Possibly a Curry leaf tree, Bergera koenigii, syn Murraya koenigii

https://www.google.com/search?q=Curr...=1564208515584
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Old 07-27-2019, 02:15 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Possibly a Curry leaf tree, Bergera koenigii, syn Murraya koenigii

https://www.google.com/search?q=Curr...=1564208515584

Those are attractive.


.
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Old 07-28-2019, 04:58 AM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
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Thanks for the answers. Interesting suggestions.

I think I'll go with Honey Locust. It seems more matching. Not to mention, they say it's an invasive weed here in New South Wales. So it's likely that.

https://weeds.dpi.nsw.gov.au/Weeds/HoneyLocust

Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I looked at those trees and I know what they look like to me but I also know that the trees I'm thinking of would most likely not ever be able to survive in Sydney's climate and would be a waste of time and money to try, so they're probably not what they look like to me. I really would need to see close ups of the flowers and fruits at the very least.
Now I wonder what the tree was you're thinking of? You got me tantalised.
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Old 07-28-2019, 02:31 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post


...... Now I wonder what the tree was you're thinking of? You got me tantalised.

I was looking at the pinnate leaves (which are still too far away to see properly) and the trunk and branches growth habit/shape of your trees in question, and they immediately make me think of western mountain ash or Sitka mountain ash, (rather than eastern American mountain ash or European ashes). But I know they won't survive in Australia.

But there are many species of trees with pinnate leaves - just to name a few for examples there are several types of ash, walnut, hickory, elder, sumacs, coffee, acacias (locust is an acacia and there are over 1,350 acacia species in the world plus thousands of species of other plants/trees in the fabaceae family alone all possessing pinnate leaves).

That's why I was mentioning about all the other really essential identifiers like close up pictures of leaves, flowers, fruits, thorns, bark and the like.

I personally don't think those trees you posted look the least bit like honey locusts but they are just too far away and indistinct to ID properly, however there's no doubt in my mind they are probably some kind of acacia because there's nearly a thousand species of acacias found growing naturally in Australia alone. Not all acacias have pinnate leaves, as you'll see if you look at the pictures of some of the Australian acacias shown in the second link below.

Here is the link with some information and lists of the hundreds of commonly grown acacias (what you call wattles) in Australia - perhaps it will help you to identify your pictured trees from the lists:

Wattles, genus Acacia - Australian Plant Information

and Australian National Botanic Gardens - Growing Acacia

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 07-28-2019 at 03:59 PM..
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