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Old 07-26-2019, 06:49 PM
Status: "Forsythias have leaves!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
842 posts, read 196,497 times
Reputation: 537

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Whatever magnolia I plant being evergreen in my area is my main priority, but I'd like to know because Sweetbay is native to Tennessee while Magnolia grandiflora (Southern magnolia) isn't and won't even propagate by seed. However, I do prefer the hardy North American palms (especially Rhapidophyllum hystrix or Sabal minor) or either type of magnolia over the Japanese banana or Pampas grass, the latter two of which are smaller, deciduous and non-native.

Thanks in advance for taking the time to read and answer this!
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Old 07-26-2019, 07:09 PM
 
Location: Floribama
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Down here on the gulf coast Sweetbay is evergreen, but I think it TN it would likely lose it leaves during the winter.
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Old 07-28-2019, 03:50 PM
 
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Sweet Bay magnolia are semi-evergreen in Tennessee. Quite a messy tree as they tend to drop leaves slowly all winter. Magnolia 'DD Blanchard' is a wonderful evergreen variety to plant that does well here. Deep green glossy leaves with a deep brown underneath. Strikingly beautiful.
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Old 07-28-2019, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Floribama
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cbrownlandscaper View Post
Sweet Bay magnolia are semi-evergreen in Tennessee. Quite a messy tree as they tend to drop leaves slowly all winter. Magnolia 'DD Blanchard' is a wonderful evergreen variety to plant that does well here. Deep green glossy leaves with a deep brown underneath. Strikingly beautiful.
I have a DD Blanchard I bought years ago at the botanical gardens. It is beautiful but it’s also a lot slower growing than a seedling Southern Magnolia.
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Old 07-28-2019, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
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I had Sweet Bay Magnolia in Southern New Jersey. It wasn't an evergreen there, but took all winter to drop its leaves. It's a very tough tree.
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Old 08-02-2019, 04:00 PM
Status: "Forsythias have leaves!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
842 posts, read 196,497 times
Reputation: 537
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
I had Sweet Bay Magnolia in Southern New Jersey. It wasn't an evergreen there, but took all winter to drop its leaves. It's a very tough tree.
Do you mean it was semi-evergreen like a Southern Live Oak, or did the leaves turning brown the first time it dropped into the single-digits or lower teens?
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Old 08-06-2019, 06:46 PM
 
Location: Climate Zone Dfa/ Hardiness zone 6a, 46062
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I would imagine that whether it would be evergreen or deciduous would vary with the severity of any given winters cold waves. I know that in my borderline 5b/6a hardiness zone in central Indiana, the sweetbay magnolia is invariably deciduous, albeit during warmer than average falls and winters it is somewhat tardily deciduous. I would guess that in Tennessee’s zone 7a, it would vary between tardily deciduous and semi evergreen, depending on the winter that season.
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Old 08-07-2019, 05:10 AM
Status: "Forsythias have leaves!" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
842 posts, read 196,497 times
Reputation: 537
Quote:
Originally Posted by Isleofpalms85 View Post
I would imagine that whether it would be evergreen or deciduous would vary with the severity of any given winters cold waves. I know that in my borderline 5b/6a hardiness zone in central Indiana, the sweetbay magnolia is invariably deciduous, albeit during warmer than average falls and winters it is somewhat tardily deciduous. I would guess that in Tennessee’s zone 7a, it would vary between tardily deciduous and semi evergreen, depending on the winter that season.
That's kind of what I figured. Thank you! Should I opt for the Southern Magnolia, then?
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Old 08-07-2019, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Climate Zone Dfa/ Hardiness zone 6a, 46062
3,401 posts, read 2,237,477 times
Reputation: 1163
^^^^^^^


Yes, the southern magnolia should do well in your zone 7a in mid Tennessee
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