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Old 07-30-2019, 03:07 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
25,456 posts, read 16,407,699 times
Reputation: 38260

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
I don't know how dry Idaho and the Pacific Northwest actually get, but apart from places within 100 miles of the coast or at higher elevations, most of the native vegetation I've seen in Google Maps Street View is like that of a steppe or desert, even though the areas mostly get enough winter precipitation to be "Mediterranean" (even if continental, although they aren't closer to the coast and in some low-lying/sheltered locations) rather than arid or semi-arid.

However, if it's the Colorado/Wyoming/New Mexico type of dry, that shouldn't be legal. I don't think even watering grasses should be legal in desert states like those three, as well as Utah, Arizona and Nevada. People need to stop growing water-intensive plants in the desert in summertime. The Colorado River is drying up for a reason, and it must be conserved by opting for species adapted to desert climates in such states.

Now, end of rant. I'm not here to start an off-topic debate. To add onto my question: How many deciduous trees are there in those areas that aren't watered all summer? What happens to them?

P.S.: Yes, you are right. Most of the U.S. experiences drought in late summer/early autumn, but eastern North America (which has humid continental climate in the north and humid subtropical in the south with one small region each of tropical and oceanic) doesn't get the kind of extensive warm-season droughts California and the northwest do.
I do know water is restricted in CO. I have never heard that water is restricted in E. OR. When we visited a couple of weeks ago, hoses were out. It is probable that water is expensive.

E. OR is wheat country. The land is rolling, with mountains in the distance. It seems higher up than SW WA is. The native trees cluster around rivers and streams, but people do plant trees in their yards. And there are trees in the few parks I’ve seen.

If you drive I 84 east from PDX metro, you can see how the land changes almost as you are looking at it. You enter temperate rainforest, then leave as you pass the area around Mt, Hood, into rain shadow where it is obvious that rain is not falling as it does just a few miles west. As you proceed east, you enter wheat country, and here the landscape looks a little less barren than it did.

Farther South, the landscape reminds me of Utah in its scenic barrenness. I have no idea what the water use rules are there.
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Old 07-30-2019, 04:35 PM
 
2,602 posts, read 1,873,703 times
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Desert willow is deciduous and they thrive in the desert environment with very little water
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Old 07-30-2019, 06:09 PM
Status: "Our main spring leaf-out is in progress!" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
896 posts, read 208,360 times
Reputation: 581
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I do know water is restricted in CO. I have never heard that water is restricted in E. OR. When we visited a couple of weeks ago, hoses were out. It is probable that water is expensive.

E. OR is wheat country. The land is rolling, with mountains in the distance. It seems higher up than SW WA is. The native trees cluster around rivers and streams, but people do plant trees in their yards. And there are trees in the few parks I’ve seen.

If you drive I 84 east from PDX metro, you can see how the land changes almost as you are looking at it. You enter temperate rainforest, then leave as you pass the area around Mt, Hood, into rain shadow where it is obvious that rain is not falling as it does just a few miles west. As you proceed east, you enter wheat country, and here the landscape looks a little less barren than it did.

Farther South, the landscape reminds me of Utah in its scenic barrenness. I have no idea what the water use rules are there.
Just to be clear, I never said necessarily that the water use rules were as strict as I mentioned, but rather that they SHOULD be as strict as I mentioned for the regions I mentioned. Again, thanks for the information, though.
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Old 07-30-2019, 09:12 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
8,728 posts, read 7,460,254 times
Reputation: 18144
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sun Belt-lover L.A.M. View Post
Thank you for the information! So apparently drought deciduous trees can only exist where winters get, at coldest, a few light frosts?

No, not necessarily. There are other aspects of climate that must be taken into consideration, not just how much water there is in the ground or what the temperatures are. There are deciduous trees and plants that exist in dry places in some northern regions of both North America and the Eurasian continent where temperatures steadily remain at or below freezing for 4 to 6 months a year. Then after spring and into summer they may consistently get hot day-time temperatures and freezing night-time temperatures with a light frost from frozen vapour that covers the surface of everything. Believe it or not, that light coating of frost is a type of protective insulation that helps prevent loss of moisture from the plants. They get moisture in the spring then in the summer months they may get very dry and hot droughty conditions right into autumn when plants start to go dormant because of decreasing light, but after temperatures have already dropped to freezing with the approach of winter. They may drop their leaves and brown up early but if the roots of deciduous plants are insulated below the surface at a depth that freezing temperatures can't reach down to then the plants are protected even if they haven't actually started to go dormant yet.

.
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Old 11-02-2019, 11:59 AM
 
93 posts, read 15,620 times
Reputation: 65
I think you should look further south)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Balmaceda,_Chile
There, Nothofagus grows OK)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cerro_Catedral#Climate
There - too)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Las_Le%C3%B1as#Climate
I dunno is there any deciduous trees, but it is possible they are there
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