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Old 08-06-2019, 07:59 PM
 
2,398 posts, read 5,250,509 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
The point that I was trying to make, and that I think YorktownGal was trying to make - and which you seem to be deflecting away from - was .... How do you know? Have you already discussed this project of yours with your neighbour and has your neighbor told you that plants growing through the fence to his side is what he wants? Has your neighbour expressed his approval and desire for you to grow plants that will be encroaching upon his own space and property? And has he agreed that it will be okay for you to go onto his property to do the necessary mainentance that will need to be done on his side of the fence, no matter what kind of plants/trees you grow there? Is that what your neighbour wants and has told you, and has your neighbour indicated a preference for any particular types of plants he would like to see growing on his side of the fence?

See, as Yorktown Gal mentioned, if your neighbour doesn't want it he will be within his rights to deface or destroy anything that encroaches on his side of the fence, which in turn might kill what ever you have planted. Especially if he uses some kind of poison on the vegetation that grows through the fence.

.
They want it. Lots of wasted bandwidth here.
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Old 08-06-2019, 10:22 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
8,666 posts, read 7,418,792 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubygreta View Post
They want it. Lots of wasted bandwidth here.

Thanks for finally clarifying that. Not enough bandwidth wasted there.
.
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Old 08-07-2019, 01:55 AM
 
8,147 posts, read 4,447,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubygreta View Post
Yes, I would like both sides blocked. Which is making the selection difficult.

Thanks for your assistance.
Attach wooden boards to both sides of it.
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Old 08-07-2019, 05:20 AM
 
1,688 posts, read 505,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubygreta View Post
This neighbor would definitely like it.

I'm thinking the emerald green arborviate is the best bet. I have one in front of my house, and I always have to clip the back. So it looks as if the leaves would go through the holes of the chain link fence.

Thanks again, YG! Oh I pass through Yortktown on the bike path.
You may consider yews and ilex opaca- Native American holly- both are trees- but could be kept trimmed as a hedge- they will go through the fence. The trick for your neighbor’s side- is to trim often- not letting the protruding branches to become woody- when the stay soft - the fence will be completely covered- but it will be a pain to trim- as trimmers can get damaged or damage the fence. Not everyone want/ could do it manually, depending on the length of your fence.
Why not both of you and your neighbor plant on each side of the fence?
Then you have a beautiful and varied evergreen hedge which would reduce noise and give you both privacy?
How much space is available on your neighbor’s side?
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Old 08-07-2019, 05:29 AM
 
1,688 posts, read 505,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bagster View Post
I put up a chain link fence 4 years ago and planned on doing the vine-cover thing. I finally decided there was no good answer. So I went this route: https://www.fencescreen.com/

The screen I chose for my 100' section cost a hunderd bucks, and is still looking good.
I am sorry, but it looks like a construction site.
Alive beautiful greenery providing food, shelter for birds and insects, wonderful serenity, privacy and noise abatement to people or more plastic from China and nearly indestructible garbage eventually to the US?
What is a better choice?
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Old 08-07-2019, 08:46 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
24,239 posts, read 31,267,397 times
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One of the nice "hedges" I've owned was a mix of climbing rose and honeysuckle. The rose was fragrant and the honeysuckle is fragrant at night. The hedge looks beautiful and smells wonderful. Both plants have flowers that are pretty and honey bee friendly.



Still, my vote is "bad idea". You are going to damage your fence.


Maybe the neighbor who wants the fence covered can plant shrubs on his side while you plant shrubs on your side to mask the appearance of the fence.
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Old 08-07-2019, 01:28 PM
 
2,398 posts, read 5,250,509 times
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I am looking at Manhattan euonymous. I think it is a fast grower, and is not subjected to the diseases of the yellow-leaf euonymous. Also, wintercreeper euonymous. The fast growing the better.
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Old 08-07-2019, 08:28 PM
 
1,934 posts, read 629,252 times
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For Manhattan euonymous:

"Foliage is evergreen in warm winter climates, but semi-evergreen to deciduous in cold winter climates (USDA Zones 5 and 6) where leaves may turn yellow or leaves may drop or plants may die back to the ground."

Euonymus kiautschovicus 'Manhattan' - Plant Finder

1) It produces fruit which is nice.

2) It isn't poisonous, another plus.

3) It isn't invasion like Euonymus alatus, the burning bush, which is now banned. Finally.

https://www.lohud.com/story/news/201...ants/24694675/

If you don't mind risking a die back every couple of years, it's fine. We had one October snowstorm that was a shock to many plants. Thankfully, it doesn't happen too often.

Forget Winter Creeper, it's invasive. https://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/s....html?sub=3024

On top of that winter creeper is heavy which will destroy your fence fast.

Last edited by YorktownGal; 08-07-2019 at 08:46 PM..
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Old 08-07-2019, 11:20 PM
 
8,147 posts, read 4,447,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by YorktownGal View Post
For Manhattan euonymous:

"Foliage is evergreen in warm winter climates, but semi-evergreen to deciduous in cold winter climates (USDA Zones 5 and 6) where leaves may turn yellow or leaves may drop or plants may die back to the ground."

Euonymus kiautschovicus 'Manhattan' - Plant Finder

1) It produces fruit which is nice.

2) It isn't poisonous, another plus.

3) It isn't invasion like Euonymus alatus, the burning bush, which is now banned. Finally.

https://www.lohud.com/story/news/201...ants/24694675/

If you don't mind risking a die back every couple of years, it's fine. We had one October snowstorm that was a shock to many plants. Thankfully, it doesn't happen too often.

Forget Winter Creeper, it's invasive. https://www.invasiveplantatlas.org/s....html?sub=3024

On top of that winter creeper is heavy which will destroy your fence fast.
The plant may be precluded from sale in three or four New England States, whether for good reason or bad but that hardly warrants claiming it is banned in general, especially on a forum that is not only national, but international in scope.
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Old 08-08-2019, 10:08 AM
 
1,934 posts, read 629,252 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kokonutty View Post
The plant may be precluded from sale in three or four New England States, whether for good reason or bad but that hardly warrants claiming it is banned in general, especially on a forum that is not only national, but international in scope.


This discussion is specific to Westchester County, NY.


Euonymus alatus (Burning Bush) is prohibited in Westchester County, NY.

Wintercreeper is regulated in Westchester County.


From the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

"What is the difference between prohibited and regulated invasive species?

Prohibited invasive species cannot be knowingly possessed with the intent to sell, import, purchase,
transport or introduce. In addition, no person shall sell, import, purchase, transport, introduce or
propagate prohibited invasive species.

Regulated invasive species, on the other hand, are species which cannot be knowingly introduced into a free-living state, or introduced by a means that one should have known would lead to such an introduction, although such species shall be legal to possess, sell, buy, propagate and transport.

https://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/lands_fo...tedplants2.pdf
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