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Old 08-09-2019, 07:12 AM
 
1,924 posts, read 624,776 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYC refugee View Post
Yes, but I'm going to suggest bamboo instead.
I like bamboo. I've seen it grown in Sunnyside, Queens and it fun!

You'll have to find a non-invasive one.

Some bamboo needs a solid barrier made of concrete, metal or pressure-treated wood at least 18 inches deep around the bamboo to prevent it from spreading.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/19/r...king-over.html

https://www.networx.com/article/5-re...boo-in-your-ya
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Old 08-09-2019, 08:00 AM
 
28,230 posts, read 34,818,237 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EastwardBound View Post
Try grapevine, honeysuckle, or virginia creeper.
Holy crap do not plant Virginia Creeper!!
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Old 08-09-2019, 08:11 AM
 
Location: Boonies of N. Alabama
3,024 posts, read 2,602,554 times
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Clumping bamboo rather than running type.
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Old 08-09-2019, 08:34 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,897 posts, read 12,695,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChessieMom View Post
Holy crap do not plant Virginia Creeper!!
Isn't that the vine that you see on old houses down South that is sucking the whole house into the ground?

There are species of honeysuckle that are considered invasive.

As far as grapevines; I had them all over our property, choking out the tree canopies, when we first bought our land. I would cut them off at the base of the tree and chain them to the back of my pickup to pull them free of the trees. One vine was so large and strong, that when chained to the back of my truck, actually picked the tail of the truck off the ground and pulled me backwards as the tree straightened up. I would say that would not be a great choice for a cover!
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Old 08-10-2019, 10:34 AM
 
16,833 posts, read 14,722,123 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Isn't that the vine that you see on old houses down South that is sucking the whole house into the ground?

There are species of honeysuckle that are considered invasive.

As far as grapevines; I had them all over our property, choking out the tree canopies, when we first bought our land. I would cut them off at the base of the tree and chain them to the back of my pickup to pull them free of the trees. One vine was so large and strong, that when chained to the back of my truck, actually picked the tail of the truck off the ground and pulled me backwards as the tree straightened up. I would say that would not be a great choice for a cover!
The house eater of the south is usually kudzu.
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Old 08-10-2019, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,897 posts, read 12,695,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
The house eater of the south is usually kudzu.
Both sound like house eaters: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parthe...s_quinquefolia and for kudzu: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kudzu.

Thank you!
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Old 08-10-2019, 02:19 PM
 
4,771 posts, read 3,209,451 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Isn't that the vine that you see on old houses down South that is sucking the whole house into the ground?

There are species of honeysuckle that are considered invasive.

As far as grapevines; I had them all over our property, choking out the tree canopies, when we first bought our land. I would cut them off at the base of the tree and chain them to the back of my pickup to pull them free of the trees. One vine was so large and strong, that when chained to the back of my truck, actually picked the tail of the truck off the ground and pulled me backwards as the tree straightened up. I would say that would not be a great choice for a cover!
We fight the grapevines as well! And Virginia Creeper. And thank goodness the kudzu stays about a block away from our property.

I do like honeysuckle.
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Old 08-13-2019, 06:41 AM
 
2,688 posts, read 988,470 times
Reputation: 4749
I've had chainlink around four of the five Zone 7 houses/gardens I've owned and have tried various approaches both natural and artificial. This has been my experience:

Good: planting a row of evergreen azaleas (using cvs that top out at 3 to 4 ft so as not to block the view about the fence) or rhododendrons on my side in part shaded areas; in sun, a row of Abelia (even when leafless it's dense enough to block the fencing); various honeysuckle cultivars; Clematis paniculata left unpruned.

Meh: brown plastic fence slats. Effective but boring and industrial looking. Used porcelain vine one year (Ampelopsis brevipedunculata 'Elegans') which has gorgeous blue berries but the flowers attract every stinging insect in the world (especially wasps!) so not a good choice of anywhere near a traffic or planting-maintenance area because it has a long flowering period.

Not good: English ivy, Virginia creeper, Euonymus of any description

Horrible idea that I never considered and never would: Any kind of bamboo. Some municipalities have even banned it here.

Someone asked why install chainlink fence only to mask it; it could be a number of reasons, including having a swimming pool in the backyard and/or needing to keep pets or other animals in or out. Some people don't want solid fencing (wood needs maintenance and/or eventually deteriorates; vinyl is disliked by some) and so the only two choices are chainlink or powder coated aluminum. The latter, while much nicer looking, isn't as good for animal control and is more expensive than chainlink. That said, all of the chainlink fencing I've had has come with the house; luckily have never had to install new fencing myself.

In the swimming-pool scenario, building codes usually mandate either fencing the entire backyard or just the area around the pool itself. Many people don't like the latter choice because it looks like a giant cage plopped into the yard; I agree. At least with the perimeter chainlink one can screen it.

Last edited by BBCjunkie; 08-13-2019 at 06:51 AM..
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