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Old 08-05-2019, 09:37 AM
 
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Hi - just installed a black chain link fence. I would like to plant something on my side of the fence that would also cover the other side of the fence. Prefer an evergreen. Ivy or plant? Fast grower preferred. Not interested in arborvaities because they don't cover the other side. Have been warned to avoid euonymus.

Thanks!
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Old 08-05-2019, 05:48 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
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Chain link isn't strong enough to hold up heavy plants, and you've paid a pretty penny to have that black chain link installed. The black chain link is not as strong as the regular chain link.


Go with something that isn't a big stout plant, maybe clematis? Maybe a star jasmine?


Ivy will rip that fence right down.


If you want a heavy plant, like a grape vine, plant some stout posts and string a trellis of heavy wire and let the vine be supported by that while it grows through the chain link fence.


it would help if you say what zone or at least what growing conditions.
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Old 08-05-2019, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
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I think an evergreen shrub like arborvitae WILL grow through and hide the fence in the shortest time, and it will be self-supporting and not pull the fence down.

I had a similar thought to woodsmoke about ivy. English ivy will be great the first year and the second year and then in years that follow will get THICK and heavy and start growing straight out in all directions, and when the time comes to finally take it down, it will all be one, tangled mass and the fence will be ruined by removing it.
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Old 08-05-2019, 07:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
Chain link isn't strong enough to hold up heavy plants, and you've paid a pretty penny to have that black chain link installed. The black chain link is not as strong as the regular chain link.


Go with something that isn't a big stout plant, maybe clematis? Maybe a star jasmine?


Ivy will rip that fence right down.


If you want a heavy plant, like a grape vine, plant some stout posts and string a trellis of heavy wire and let the vine be supported by that while it grows through the chain link fence.


it would help if you say what zone or at least what growing conditions.
Not sure why English Ivy would be a problem if it were constantly trimmed.

I live just north of NYC, so I believe it is 6B.

Thanks for your assistance.
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Old 08-05-2019, 07:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
I think an evergreen shrub like arborvitae WILL grow through and hide the fence in the shortest time, and it will be self-supporting and not pull the fence down.

I had a similar thought to woodsmoke about ivy. English ivy will be great the first year and the second year and then in years that follow will get THICK and heavy and start growing straight out in all directions, and when the time comes to finally take it down, it will all be one, tangled mass and the fence will be ruined by removing it.
If it grows straight out I would immediately trim it.

With respect to arborvitae, you are saying that the bushes will block the other side of a chain link fence?

Thanks.
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Old 08-05-2019, 07:46 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
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I'm just not sure you've seen what happens to ivy as it ages. The stalks get thick, and heavy. I don't think you'd like it, in the long run. Within a few years the stalks can all be an inch or more in diameter, sending out LOTs of growth to manage and cut. It could be a full time job, keeping the ivy from taking over everything!

With arborvitae, or any evergreen shrub, if you plant it close to the fence, it will grow right through it, I think eventually hiding it from either side.
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Old 08-05-2019, 07:53 PM
 
Location: Rochester, WA
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Here's what older english ivy stems look like a good collection of stock images... scroll down and click through pages... won't let me copy them here but good examples:


https://www.alamy.com/search.html?pn...aw=ivy%20stems
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Old 08-05-2019, 07:59 PM
 
2,398 posts, read 5,252,139 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
Here's what older english ivy stems look like a good collection of stock images... scroll down and click through pages... won't let me copy them here but good examples:


https://www.alamy.com/search.html?pn...aw=ivy%20stems
That is pretty thick!
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Old 08-05-2019, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rubygreta View Post
Not sure why English Ivy would be a problem if it were constantly trimmed.

I live just north of NYC, so I believe it is 6B.

Thanks for your assistance.
If you have deer then you might not have to worry about pruning your English Ivy since they love to eat it. The plant would never make an effective cover around my house.

While you want to cover the chain link fence; do you really need climbers? Why not just block your vision of it with a line of plants in front of it? Is it necessary to block your neighbor's view of the fence?
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Old 08-05-2019, 08:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post

While you want to cover the chain link fence; do you really need climbers? Why not just block your vision of it with a line of plants in front of it? Is it necessary to block your neighbor's view of the fence?
There are so many nice bushes to chose from. Bushes also will also cover a fence faster and more evenly than a climber.

Just north of NYC is more like zone 5 (I'm zone 5 in Yorktown).

Are you in sun or shade? A combination of morning sun and afternoon shade or morning shade and afternoon sun?
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