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Old 08-17-2019, 06:07 PM
 
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takin' out: azaleas. we have too many.
puttin' in: mulch. we will decide later.
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Old 08-17-2019, 06:19 PM
 
Location: Wilmington NC
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I'm taking it all out! I just bought a house with an overgrown mess. It harbors RATS!

I've started by selling the 3 koi ponds. They are overgrown and slimy and I can only envision the rats doing the backstroke in there. Quite a bit of work to remove the largest because you have to go up some steps and back down to haul out the stacked stone that was supporting it, and then do it again to fill the hole/cover with fabric/layer with gravel.

I plan to have a clump of bamboo the size of a VW Bus taken out professionally. Then we're going to add a retaining wall and groom the remaining azaleas and hydrangeas.

I'm going to 'grow' a patio out my back door so rats have less foliage to hide in, and I'm having gutters installed to keep water away from the foundation of the house.

I plan to put beds around the perimeter of the yard so there is less lawn (aka weeds). Vegetables on the sunny side in the spring. And I may have a small oak tree removed because as much as I love deciduous trees, a giant oak is not what I'm going for. That is about all I will have time for this fall!

We've had a week straight of rain and another week forecast, so it's getting to be like Jumanji up in here!
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Old 08-17-2019, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Wilmington NC
5,760 posts, read 5,413,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turkeydance View Post
takin' out: azaleas. we have too many.
puttin' in: mulch. we will decide later.
Blasphemy! No such thing as too many azaleas!
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Old 08-17-2019, 09:03 PM
 
2,118 posts, read 799,301 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stagemomma View Post
I'm taking it all out! I just bought a house with an overgrown mess. It harbors RATS!

....

I'm going to 'grow' a patio out my back door so rats have less foliage to hide in


And I may have a small oak tree removed

All excellent steps (take it from someone who bought a house that was discovered to have a rat problem) but there's one thing to AVOID doing. Do not have any bird feeders anywhere near your house. Best practice is none at all anywhere in the yard, actually. Bird feeders are rat-and-mouse "fine dining." You don't want a restaurant like that anywhere near your house. Hopefully your next door neighbors don't have bird feeders either.

Hardscaping near the house is an excellent idea; ideal is to keep 3 ft clear of vegetation all around the foundation. Also remove the oak, for sure: Rats just love acorns.

Examine the house's foundation and make 100% certain there are no openings through which rodents can gain access. Rats only need a 1/2" opening. Mice only need 1/4" but they will enlarge a smaller one with their teeth if need be.

Former owners of our house had plant material close to the house, several bird feeders, multiple oak trees, and various small openings (barely noticeable unless examined closely, and remember: rats can and do climb) on the exterior such as under siding, around windows and doors, small cracks around foundation, etc. The result: rodents living inside the walls and ceiling of the finished basement. The amount of acorns, nuts and seeds that was cached behind the drywall was staggering. Truly nightmare inducing. THe entire basement had to be professionally gutted and sterilized. It cost $$$$. No clue about all this before we bought the place, it was discovered after purchase. A real horror show. Prevention is the key!
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Old 08-18-2019, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
71,409 posts, read 53,854,742 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
What are you taking out, or putting in for fall?
For first time in 10 yrs I'm planning on putting new bulbs in the ground. I saw Spring bulbs displayed at Lowes and it reminded me.


Also planning on putting in a tree where the lightning hit the Blue Spruce.
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Old 08-18-2019, 07:05 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
38,400 posts, read 47,281,770 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
For first time in 10 yrs I'm planning on putting new bulbs in the ground. I saw Spring bulbs displayed at Lowes and it reminded me.


Also planning on putting in a tree where the lightning hit the Blue Spruce.
I miss spring bulbs so much. Here in GA the winter is not long/cold enough, I guess. No bulb I’ve planted has ever been seen again.
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Old 08-18-2019, 08:41 AM
 
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Oh yes, bulbs. As a Mother's Day gift Daughter gave me three packages of Asian lilies and came in to plant them for me. The bunnies have shorn them down every chance they've gotten and nothing has helped. They even managed to get under the netting this last time. Those leaves must be especially tasty.

But as a result of her gift I got a new flower garden dug for me. Hooray - a new canvas! I wanted to put in purple penstemmon and cinnamon and yellow yarrow with asters in the back but thought to wait until later in the season and right now I can't get the varieties I want. So I guess I'll have to wait until Spring.

She dug some wild asters for me but the pretty little things which look so charming driving by the woods look a bit straggly in my garden.

gentlearts, would it make a difference if you refrigerated your bulbs for a couple of months before you planted them?
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Old 08-18-2019, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
38,400 posts, read 47,281,770 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Oh yes, bulbs. As a Mother's Day gift Daughter gave me three packages of Asian lilies and came in to plant them for me. The bunnies have shorn them down every chance they've gotten and nothing has helped. They even managed to get under the netting this last time. Those leaves must be especially tasty.

But as a result of her gift I got a new flower garden dug for me. Hooray - a new canvas! I wanted to put in purple penstemmon and cinnamon and yellow yarrow with asters in the back but thought to wait until later in the season and right now I can't get the varieties I want. So I guess I'll have to wait until Spring.

She dug some wild asters for me but the pretty little things which look so charming driving by the woods look a bit straggly in my garden.

gentlearts, would it make a difference if you refrigerated your bulbs for a couple of months before you planted them?
That might help the first year, but not after they were in the ground. I think of it this way, while I miss some northern plants, in return I get to enjoy different things, like camellia in January or an orange tree.
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Old 08-18-2019, 10:53 AM
 
Location: Virginia
4,512 posts, read 2,337,008 times
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The only thing I will be taking out is some spent annuals and there are very few of them. I won some new varieties of vinca at a Master Gardeners meeting, otherwise I wouldn't have planted them. Everything else in my new garden beds is new: coneflowers, yarrow, sedum, viburnums, chrysanthemums, hydrangeas, butterfly bush, rudbeckia, gaillardia, penstemon. I also landscaped with low evergreens and mulch directly behind the house where I don't want to bother with leaves dropping in the fall. As far as putting in for the fall, I will be doing a huge kidney-shaped bed on one side of the front yard for roses, shrubs, perennials, and tons of bulbs for all seasons. There will be another long bed on the same side along the property line with crape myrtles and two lower shrubs (haven't decided yet.) The other side of the yard will have an oval bed with a red contorted filbert and perennials and bulbs, and I am seriously thinking of planting a line of Don Egolf redbuds along the driveway. My yard helpers will be thrilled at all the work. More $ for them, lol.
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Old 08-18-2019, 11:23 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,673 posts, read 1,837,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
That might help the first year, but not after they were in the ground. I think of it this way, while I miss some northern plants, in return I get to enjoy different things, like camellia in January or an orange tree.
Same here, I’m enjoying planting natives new to me. They take less work, water and fertilizers. I’m not a purist though, I have tropicals/exotics, but I stay away from invasives, which in 10a can be considered normal plants elsewhere.

I started Seminole pumpkins from seed a month ago and planted them this week. I also started Everglade tomatoes from seed, but they are not quite strong enough to plant yet. Neither are true natives, but they can both take the heat and humidity here. Planting in full summer is limited to a few vegetables. I plant in mid August and again in February; two four month cycles. It’s taken a while to catch on.

In one of my garden beds, I planted a small, native Lignum vitae tree which is very slow growing. I have an Australian red finger lime, a non-native, arriving this week and will keep it in a pot and move it around until I figure out where it’s the happiest in the garden before planting.

I added more sunshine mimosa, a ground cover, and a few more dune sunflowers last week. Both are doing well and love the full sun here. It takes a hardy, native plant for that.

We were snowbirds for the first five years and have lived here full time for the last two years. I love being able to give our garden my undivided attention now.

Last edited by jean_ji; 08-18-2019 at 12:03 PM..
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