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Old 01-19-2020, 01:15 AM
 
1,055 posts, read 289,432 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
They root pretty well (in water, but may root in soil as well). I have rooted Cairo Morning Glory (Ipomoea cairica) and it's growing pretty well. They are invasive though.
This is true, they can really take over everything, and fast-growing, hence my warning. But they’re really hardy. And, the blue flowers are beautiful and cheerful.
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Old 01-25-2020, 07:23 AM
 
Location: Florida
11,987 posts, read 5,615,060 times
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I don't know if these trees grow in Australia as they are tropical but I successfully planted a cutting from my Frangipani (aka Plumeria) about 2 months ago and although still small, it is putting out flowers even though this is not the normal time of year to bloom. Their flowers are used a lot in the Hawaiian leis.
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Old 01-25-2020, 09:36 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
10,461 posts, read 8,396,315 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
I don't know if these trees grow in Australia as they are tropical but I successfully planted a cutting from my Frangipani (aka Plumeria) about 2 months ago and although still small, it is putting out flowers even though this is not the normal time of year to bloom. Their flowers are used a lot in the Hawaiian leis.
Frangipanis are ubiquitous street and garden trees here in the warmer parts of Australia, from Sydney to Brisbane. They root in my experience, but they're pretty slow growers. Flashforward 6 months and my cutting is barely producing leaves, although I can see some sprouting. Maybe they need perpetually humid hot weather? Here it's more on the dry side, besides a few thundery days. Astonished that yours are flowering just after two months. Guessing the consistently warm and humid climate of Florida (guessing you're from the southern end) helps them to root and grow quickly?

Completely forgot about Frangipanis btw. Thanks for bringing them up.

P.S. The upper half of Australia is between subtropical (desert and humid subtropical) and tropical. Darwin and Cairns are pretty much tropical. Bananas grow in northern Queensland (and are native to that region as well).
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Old 01-26-2020, 08:01 AM
 
Location: Florida
11,987 posts, read 5,615,060 times
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I live on the SW Gulf Coast where it is definitely hot & humid for at least 6 months, then just very warm with the occasional cool front. We were in the high 30's last Tuesday morning but by the next day it was in the 70's during the day.

Regarding the Frangipani: when my lawn guy was here back in August he accidentally broke off a large branch of my Frangipani that was hanging a little low. I trimmed it into 4 different pieces and just threw them in the garage which is mostly dark. Completely forgot about them until a few months ago when I cleaned out the garage. They had started to sprout so I put them in soil and the next thing I know I had one with flowers. I wish I could remember how to post pictures.

I transplanted a cutting about two years ago directly into the ground in the backyard and it has not done well. Google Frangipani cuttings as they give all the instructions.

Last edited by chiluvr1228; 01-26-2020 at 09:22 AM..
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Old 02-02-2020, 11:54 AM
 
Location: St Paul's Bay, Malta
11,933 posts, read 6,745,106 times
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Hibiscus as you mentioned are quite easy to root in water, my Hibiscus arnottianus actually came from a cutting I took of a huge tree sized one growing outside a hotel. Other "free" garden plants I have which came from cuttings are Acalypha wilkesiana, from a branch hanging over someones wall & Ficus elastica which was from a street tree that had been pruned. I also pruned a large Yucca elephantipes in my garden last summer & the trunk which I cut off was about 10ft, so I chopped the top off, removed the lowest leaves & potted it into some soil. The rest of the trunk I then removed all the leaves from, sealed the top cut with wax & planted it elsewhere in the garden & it soon sprouted lots of new growth, so I have two new plants now from that one trunk. You can also cut the trunk into as many pieces as you like & pot them up/plant them, just remember what ends are top & bottom & seal the top with wax.
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Old 02-04-2020, 01:40 PM
 
12,398 posts, read 17,949,724 times
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Ficus- easiest rooting ever. Someone in my office tossed their distressed tree out for the trash. I took office scissors and cut two branches off and put them in water. They grew roots and I planted them in pots.
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Old 02-04-2020, 03:00 PM
 
3,893 posts, read 3,405,236 times
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My crepe myrtles throw out seeds that grow very easily. I've pulled up several small plants and threw them away because my husband doesn't want any more in the yard.

A former neighbor had a willow that got knocked down by an ice storm. He cut up several pieces for a bon fire. They all sprouted. The tree grew back.
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Old 02-04-2020, 06:01 PM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
11,588 posts, read 7,959,899 times
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Roses, camellias, hydrangeas, bay laurel all easily root from cuttings.
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Old 02-04-2020, 06:51 PM
 
184 posts, read 33,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
I've had really good luck with hydrangeas. They root really quick and easy and take off and grow fast.

Something else that is super easy to root is a grape vine.
When we lived in the upper Midwest where temps dip as low as -30 and a very very short plant growing season, I planted 3 very small Hydrangea plants thinking they might not make it. In one summer, they grew into monstrous plants and had blue hydrangeas the size of bowling balls!
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Old Today, 09:50 PM
Status: "Subtropical climates don't necessarily have 12 warm months." (set 13 days ago)
 
Location: Putnam County, TN
663 posts, read 150,423 times
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My mom has AWFUL skill rooting ANYTHING with cuttings, and I've struggled to do so with American Holly. However, I may try my luck with a Needle Palm cutting soon, as I probably won't have to worry about over-watering something that's extremely flood tolerant and naturally grows in swamps. Anyone have any experience with this?
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