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Old 02-03-2020, 10:29 AM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
24,817 posts, read 15,983,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
If you don't want to try a trap there is another option which I've had success with keeping skunks, raccoons and squirrels and other rodents out of enclosed spaces - like under the porch and under garden sheds, or in tunnels dug into the ground, etc.

Finely ground dry black pepper like the cheap, poor quality stuff you can get at dollar stores. They only need to smell it or step on it once to get the message. It will make them sneeze convulsively non-stop, plus they won't want to get any stirred up pepper dust on their fur or in their eyes or mouth. Just sprinkle or blow copious amounts of the dry black pepper all over the ground of the space you want them to stay out of.

Where I live now we have a lot of squirrels digging in the gardens. I use finely ground black pepper directly on top of the soil in all the flower beds in early spring when new shoots are just starting to come up. This helps to prevent squirrels from digging up all the bulbs or from burying their nuts. The black pepper won't cause harm to the plants in the gardens.

Use only black pepper, don't use cayenne pepper because cayenne has much higher concentrations of the active ingredient Capsaicin in it than black pepper does and if cayenne gets in their eyes it can cause permanent and extremely painful damage, even blindness. The intent is just to discourage intrusive animals and keep them away, not to cause harm to them.


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Thanks for this! Great idea that is easily implemented. Does the pepoer ever affect you as you are digging around in the garden?
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Old 02-03-2020, 11:49 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post


Thanks for this! Great idea that is easily implemented. Does the pepoer ever affect you as you are digging around in the garden?

No it doesn't, for a couple of reasons. For one, when I'm working in the garden my face rarely (if ever) gets closer than two or three feet to the ground, whereas animals walking or digging in it are all a lot shorter than me and have their noses only inches away or even right exactly at ground level because they're constantly poking their noses right into everything sniffing and smelling everything. For that reason the pepper is also a good deterrent against dogs and cats doing their business on lawns or in gardens because they almost always smell the area very close up first before they get set to do their business in it. Cats and dogs can't do their business in places that make them sneeze convulsively and forces them to close their eyes involuntarily while they're trying to squat. It is entirely against the self preservation nature of all animals to close the eyes when in a very vulnerable position that puts them at risk of attack.

The other thing is, with the gardens at least, after the pepper gets sprinkled down it does it's job, the animals get the message, they leave, they remember their unpleasant experience and they stay away. And then eventually the ground is going to get all wet from being watered with the hose, or rained on, and then the pepper gets watered right into the soil (which is actually a whole lot more beneficial for the plants for other reasons). After getting wetted down the smell of the pepper is still there right at ground level which will still make animals jerk back from the smell but any further away than 12 inches or so it's less discernible. Plus the wetted pepper dust has settled into the ground so it can't get stirred up into the nose or eyes of the person doing the gardening.

I re-apply some pepper every time I plant something new into the ground because the squirrels (and crows and jays) follow me around when I'm working in the garden and watch me like hawks to see what I'm doing. As soon as I move to another area they will immediately dig to investigate the area I just planted if I don't sprinkle a bit of pepper around the new plants. I keep a canister of black pepper in my garden cart at all times and am not afraid to be liberal with it.

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Old 02-03-2020, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,616 posts, read 12,525,081 times
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Does the black pepper help with warding off crows and jays since birds are immune to hot pepper: https://www.straightdope.com/columns...ad-the-seeds/?
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Old 02-03-2020, 12:14 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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PS to above post.


ANTS !!! and aphids are particularly susceptible to the capsaicin in black pepper so any plants that are at risk of ants farming aphids on them get a liberal dose of pepper sprinkled around the bases of the plants to keep those insects away.


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Old 02-03-2020, 12:31 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
Does the black pepper help with warding off crows and jays since birds are immune to hot pepper: https://www.straightdope.com/columns...ad-the-seeds/?

Yes it does because I'm talking about finely ground, dry black pepper powder that gets into the nose and eyes, not the fruits or seeds of pepper plants that are being consumed. The birds aren't eating the ground up pepper, not tasting it, they are getting the dust of it into their nostrils and eyes and it makes them sneeze convulsively or squeeze their eyes shut so the membranes of the eyes don't get burned. They can't afford to be in such a vulnerable state that leaves them open to attack from predators. They can't even fly away if they are sneezing violently because the eyes are involuntarily closed while sneezing and they can't maintain their equilibrium in the air while sneezing and flapping their wings.


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Old 02-03-2020, 01:46 PM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
15,616 posts, read 12,525,081 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Yes it does because I'm talking about finely ground, dry black pepper powder that gets into the nose and eyes, not the fruits or seeds of pepper plants that are being consumed. The birds aren't eating the ground up pepper, not tasting it, they are getting the dust of it into their nostrils and eyes and it makes them sneeze convulsively or squeeze their eyes shut so the membranes of the eyes don't get burned. They can't afford to be in such a vulnerable state that leaves them open to attack from predators. They can't even fly away if they are sneezing violently because the eyes are involuntarily closed while sneezing and they can't maintain their equilibrium in the air while sneezing and flapping their wings.


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The crows used to be my nemesis when planting corn. They would move right in and pull the tender shoots of corn out of the ground to eat the kernel. I do not remember having problems with the skunks in the garden. It has been many years since I finally gave up because the wildlife was better fed than we were! Perhaps I should think about it again since we just eased the restrictions on land mines?
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Old 02-03-2020, 02:40 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
8,443 posts, read 7,267,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
The crows used to be my nemesis when planting corn. They would move right in and pull the tender shoots of corn out of the ground to eat the kernel. I do not remember having problems with the skunks in the garden. It has been many years since I finally gave up because the wildlife was better fed than we were! Perhaps I should think about it again since we just eased the restrictions on land mines?
LOL. Yes, try pepper bombs instead.


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Old 02-03-2020, 02:59 PM
 
1,473 posts, read 742,238 times
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I have native plant(untreated, organic)gardens, and every year a new generation takes up residence under my front porch; digging their way in.

After wasting $$$ on store bought solutions, the best solution was the cheapest:
Rags dipped in ammonia, then placed in areas of concern.
Bleach also works in a pinch, last year I dumped it through the porch board floors; entire family moved overnight.
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Old 02-04-2020, 09:33 AM
 
Location: Black Forest, CO
1,551 posts, read 2,348,630 times
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I had a skunk den under the feed room in my barn. I didn't mind having it around as they are kind of cute and eat mice and other pests, except I was worried I would startle it and get sprayed, and they also are known for contracting rabies in my area. Anyway, I decided it had to go. I tried mountain lion urine (got from a local plant nursery) - didn't work. Tried putting a radio with loud music out there, didn't work. Tried blocking the hole - it just dug another one. Tried an electric fence wire - just made it spray the area.

What finally did work - I got wire mesh and buried it all along the perimeter of the barn about a foot down in the ground, stapled to the foundation. I only blocked the hole when I knew the skunk had left for the evening. HOWEVER, after I did this, later the skunk came back and would not leave the area, and I started hearing little mews and squeaking coming from the den area. I did not realize there were babies in there and I had blocked the mom from being able to get to them! I felt so bad! I reopened a spot for the mom to get back in. I waited for her to leave after a week or so with her kits for good, then resealed the hole and they have not come back.

I have to admit, the babies were so cute as they would come out and follow the mom in a row like ducks do. She would take them out to hunt around dusk. If it weren't for the threat of stinkiness and rabies, I would love to have them around.
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Old 02-04-2020, 10:05 AM
 
Location: Michigan
2,363 posts, read 1,643,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
The grass did not grow for seven years after I tried that solution!
Next time, don't also break a mirror while shooting them.
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