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Old 02-24-2021, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Virginia
7,109 posts, read 3,557,036 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by himain View Post
So it looks like the tulips are just starting to sprout again! If I wanted to plant more, when would be a good time to do it?
Next fall.
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Old 02-25-2021, 04:35 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
41,740 posts, read 51,669,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by himain View Post
So it looks like the tulips are just starting to sprout again! If I wanted to plant more, when would be a good time to do it?
Last fall.
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Old 02-25-2021, 02:34 PM
 
Location: Way up high
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Do I do it when they die and just add bulbs to the area?
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Old 02-25-2021, 02:37 PM
 
Location: Northern California
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I bet it will look beautiful, once they all bloom.
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Old 02-25-2021, 03:47 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
10,941 posts, read 9,090,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by himain View Post
Do I do it when they die and just add bulbs to the area?
Tulips only grow and bloom in spring months and any new bulbs you plant should be planted in autumn. You won't find new bulbs available to buy until early autumn anyway so that's when you buy them and then plant them. Tulip bulbs need to go through a cold period in the ground during the winter months in order to grow and bloom in the spring. Established bulbs usually grow new baby bulbs every year too, so eventually you end up with clumps of plants growing in clusters that all originated from the first bulbs that were put in.

You can get varieties of tulip bulbs that will grow in 3 stages of spring - starting at the end of true winter and ending at the beginning of true hot mid-summer. Some varieties are very early spring bloomers (late February and onwards), some varieties are mid-season bloomers that start blooming in the middle of spring (early April and onwards) and some varieties are late season bloomers that start blooming in early June and may retain the blooms into late July/early August depending on your location and climate. Tulips don't do well in locations with very high temperatures and high humidity, they do best in locations with moderate climates.

Every autumn I plant a few more additional tulip bulbs to fill in empty spots where there are not already any established bulbs in the ground. The leaves of existing bulbs already established in the ground usually don't fully die back until late summer or early autumn, so you can use the dying leaves as location markers in the autumn to let you know where the existing bulbs are. Or you can mark their locations with bamboo BBQ skewers to know where they are, and you can fill in the empty spots with newly acquired bulbs.

In the past couple of years I have started filling in the empty spots with late season bloomers. Late bloomers are often very fancy, frilly looking double petalled flowers with exotic colours, some look like roses or peonies, so they are a change of pace and more summery in appearance from the early spring bloomers, like some of these pictured below for example (my favourite late bloomers are all the different multi-coloured, multi-frilled and blended striped exotic Parrot tulips which last a long time ):

https://www.hollandbulbfarms.com/fal...looming-tulips

https://www.longfield-gardens.com/cp/tulip-double-late

https://www.google.ca/search?q=parro...w=1338&bih=674

.
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Old 02-26-2021, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Way up high
18,063 posts, read 23,516,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Tulips only grow and bloom in spring months and any new bulbs you plant should be planted in autumn. You won't find new bulbs available to buy until early autumn anyway so that's when you buy them and then plant them. Tulip bulbs need to go through a cold period in the ground during the winter months in order to grow and bloom in the spring. Established bulbs usually grow new baby bulbs every year too, so eventually you end up with clumps of plants growing in clusters that all originated from the first bulbs that were put in.

You can get varieties of tulip bulbs that will grow in 3 stages of spring - starting at the end of true winter and ending at the beginning of true hot mid-summer. Some varieties are very early spring bloomers (late February and onwards), some varieties are mid-season bloomers that start blooming in the middle of spring (early April and onwards) and some varieties are late season bloomers that start blooming in early June and may retain the blooms into late July/early August depending on your location and climate. Tulips don't do well in locations with very high temperatures and high humidity, they do best in locations with moderate climates.

Every autumn I plant a few more additional tulip bulbs to fill in empty spots where there are not already any established bulbs in the ground. The leaves of existing bulbs already established in the ground usually don't fully die back until late summer or early autumn, so you can use the dying leaves as location markers in the autumn to let you know where the existing bulbs are. Or you can mark their locations with bamboo BBQ skewers to know where they are, and you can fill in the empty spots with newly acquired bulbs.

In the past couple of years I have started filling in the empty spots with late season bloomers. Late bloomers are often very fancy, frilly looking double petalled flowers with exotic colours, some look like roses or peonies, so they are a change of pace and more summery in appearance from the early spring bloomers, like some of these pictured below for example (my favourite late bloomers are all the different multi-coloured, multi-frilled and blended striped exotic Parrot tulips which last a long time ):

https://www.hollandbulbfarms.com/fal...looming-tulips

https://www.longfield-gardens.com/cp/tulip-double-late

https://www.google.ca/search?q=parro...w=1338&bih=674

.

WOW! Some of those tuplips are so stunning in colors. I never knew there were those varieties! Thanks for all the info! Would it look funky to mix and match bulbs next fall? I'd love to do that but the old owner, who I still speak with, has very sentimental feelings about the tulips. His wife loved to garden and they lived in the house for 26 years. She passed away from Dementia. He asked me last year to send him pictures of them
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Old 02-26-2021, 06:12 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
10,941 posts, read 9,090,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by himain View Post
WOW! Some of those tuplips are so stunning in colors. I never knew there were those varieties! Thanks for all the info! Would it look funky to mix and match bulbs next fall? I'd love to do that but the old owner, who I still speak with, has very sentimental feelings about the tulips. His wife loved to garden and they lived in the house for 26 years. She passed away from Dementia. He asked me last year to send him pictures of them
Yes, WOW! Here is some more information for you to get you started on deciding what other kinds of tulips you want to plant to offset the existing tulips. It's explanations of what each type of species is like, what time of spring they bloom, what climate conditions they need and visual guides of examples of what they look like. You can find more information about specific varieties and their needs online.

https://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/tuliptypes

https://www.ftd.com/blog/share/types...0your%20garden.

I have been mixing/matching different varieties and colours of tulips and I sure haven't gotten any complaints or criticisms from anyone. I don't mix them so much that the colours and types clash harshly with each other to create an eye-sore. I want their differences to create contrasts but also look harmonious, blending in and supportive of each other. There are so many types of tulips to choose from (3,000 varieties that fall into 14 groups) that it's easy to create something that will be perfect for you.

Remember, it's YOUR garden now and you must do as you wish with it to please yourself. So don't ever let other people's opinions about what your plants look like to them ever dictate what you do and what plants you choose for yourself in your own garden. If you want to go funky or fantastical or elegant or boring, shoot for the moon.

Did you send the old man pictures last year? What colours were the blooms? I know some new homeowners dig up and destroy everything in the gardens when they purchase a new home, then they start all over again with completely different garden designs and plants. That can often be heart breaking for previous owners to think of the plants and trees they nurtured and loved for years being destroyed. You didn't do that.

So I'm sure the old fellow is extremely gratified that you have kept his wife's tulips growing and not dug them all out and got rid of them. He will feel that her tulips are a legacy given to you from his wife who you are honouring and which will carry on in her absence and still leave a presence of her spirit and love remaining in the garden for as long as her tulips remain. Most dedicated gardeners will understand and relate to that sentiment so I think the old man will be thrilled and delighted to see the end results of you adding more of other kinds and colours of tulips and other plants to be companions to his wife's tulips. Your new additions to the garden will be more companions for his wife's little bit of spiritual presence that still remains in the garden too.

I hope next year you can post some pictures of your progress with planting more tulips.

.
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Old 02-26-2021, 07:35 PM
 
19,987 posts, read 60,296,332 times
Reputation: 37373
Take a look at this website:

https://www.johnscheepers.com/flower...ex/tulips.html

Tulips and all the bulb flowers benefit from thinning. In the south, we have daffodils that show up around the sites of old farmhouses. Some must have been planted in the 1800s. I remember tulips in Vermont coming after the crocus and daffodils, and before the iris. Spring was my favorite season.
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Old 02-27-2021, 10:36 AM
 
Location: Way up high
18,063 posts, read 23,516,924 times
Reputation: 21883
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Yes, WOW! Here is some more information for you to get you started on deciding what other kinds of tulips you want to plant to offset the existing tulips. It's explanations of what each type of species is like, what time of spring they bloom, what climate conditions they need and visual guides of examples of what they look like. You can find more information about specific varieties and their needs online.

https://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/tuliptypes

https://www.ftd.com/blog/share/types...0your%20garden.

I have been mixing/matching different varieties and colours of tulips and I sure haven't gotten any complaints or criticisms from anyone. I don't mix them so much that the colours and types clash harshly with each other to create an eye-sore. I want their differences to create contrasts but also look harmonious, blending in and supportive of each other. There are so many types of tulips to choose from (3,000 varieties that fall into 14 groups) that it's easy to create something that will be perfect for you.

Remember, it's YOUR garden now and you must do as you wish with it to please yourself. So don't ever let other people's opinions about what your plants look like to them ever dictate what you do and what plants you choose for yourself in your own garden. If you want to go funky or fantastical or elegant or boring, shoot for the moon.

Did you send the old man pictures last year? What colours were the blooms? I know some new homeowners dig up and destroy everything in the gardens when they purchase a new home, then they start all over again with completely different garden designs and plants. That can often be heart breaking for previous owners to think of the plants and trees they nurtured and loved for years being destroyed. You didn't do that.

So I'm sure the old fellow is extremely gratified that you have kept his wife's tulips growing and not dug them all out and got rid of them. He will feel that her tulips are a legacy given to you from his wife who you are honouring and which will carry on in her absence and still leave a presence of her spirit and love remaining in the garden for as long as her tulips remain. Most dedicated gardeners will understand and relate to that sentiment so I think the old man will be thrilled and delighted to see the end results of you adding more of other kinds and colours of tulips and other plants to be companions to his wife's tulips. Your new additions to the garden will be more companions for his wife's little bit of spiritual presence that still remains in the garden too.

I hope next year you can post some pictures of your progress with planting more tulips.

.

Yes I sent pictures last year and am going to again this year. He started crying on the phone talking about it and so I lost it as well. They are just regular white, red and yellow. I'd like to keep them there as long as I don't kill them somehow. I'll just add some different ones around them
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Old 02-27-2021, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Way up high
18,063 posts, read 23,516,924 times
Reputation: 21883
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Take a look at this website:

https://www.johnscheepers.com/flower...ex/tulips.html

Tulips and all the bulb flowers benefit from thinning. In the south, we have daffodils that show up around the sites of old farmhouses. Some must have been planted in the 1800s. I remember tulips in Vermont coming after the crocus and daffodils, and before the iris. Spring was my favorite season.
Thank you for this site. I'll bookmark it as well.
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