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Old 06-26-2020, 09:08 PM
 
331 posts, read 175,638 times
Reputation: 828

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BellaDL View Post
We have several big mulberry trees on the property which are very popular with the birds.

One is about 35' tall so there is no way that we could get the berries. Yesterday, we picked berries from lower branches near the hill top of another one about 20' tall. We got about 8 qt. in less than 10 minutes.

I had tasted some mulberries before but did not realize how difficult it was to remove the stems to make jams. I used a nail clipper to clip the stems from the biggest berries (about 3 qts) and used a food mill to crush the rest then blended the strained juice with the de-stemmed whole berries.

I made the jam last night using low-sugar pectin with some sugar (5:1 berries/sugar ratio), lemon juice and a touch of salt. I had it with a homemade bagel this morning. It was delicious and well worth having bluish finger tips for few days ;-)
We did the same today (went with 10:1 ratio of berries to sugar). Can't wait to try it out tomorrow. I also made 12 oz of pure mulberry juice with my Slowstar (vertical slow RPM juicer). No need for anything added to drink it straight.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
They have higher, that’s why I got them. I have blackberries and blueberries too.
So do I and many other types of berries and varieties of each. When it comes to antioxidants in blueberries, the specific variety matters. For instance, the typical grocery store variety, Bluecrop, has 10.4 (ORAC) antioxidant level compared to the Rubel 31.3 (ORAC), a smaller berry closer to a wild variety. My favorite, the Patriot, has 14.4 (ORAC). The St. Cloud is a close second. I have 12 different varieties (48 bushes) because then I can enjoy subtle differences and try to have a different variety ripen at various times of the year. I bought 3 Toro Blueberries last year (had to order the blasted twig because no one carries it in my area) and they are still growing. Probably won't fruit til next year and might just pluck their blossoms and encourage growth vs. fruit production. Do you have that variety?

Something also interesting is that wild blue berries in Alaska scored an 85 ORAC (8 times higher than the store bought variety). In the lower 48, a wild variety scored 61 ORAC. A side note is that the BWCA (boundary waters canoe area) in Minnesota, if you time your visit correctly and know where to look, you can gorge yourself on some wild blueberries. That is if you keep your eyes out for the black bears who also like to eat the berries.

Long story, short. If you are into ORAC values of a cultivated variety, go with the Rubel (zones 4-8). Herbert is also pretty high at 19.7 (zones 5-8).

Ate my first Blueberry of the year today...my favorite the patriot.
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Old 06-26-2020, 10:44 PM
 
Location: SoCal
18,369 posts, read 8,665,979 times
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No, I just buy them, I don’t pay attention to the ORAC, I have many different variety, they are so tasty compare to the store bought version, that’s why I grow them.
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Old 06-26-2020, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Was Midvalley Oregon; Now Eastside Seattle area
6,373 posts, read 2,831,221 times
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^ NewbieHere, You constantly amaze me with your agricultural knowledge. 60 trees. Wow
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Old 06-27-2020, 08:03 AM
 
Location: SoCal
18,369 posts, read 8,665,979 times
Reputation: 15134
Quote:
Originally Posted by leastprime View Post
^ NewbieHere, You constantly amaze me with your agricultural knowledge. 60 trees. Wow
Some of them are small citrus trees and blueberries, haha. But did I tell you I have 110 roses, and more tree peonies coming. Gardening keeps me out of trouble.
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Old 06-30-2020, 09:21 AM
 
331 posts, read 175,638 times
Reputation: 828
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
No, I just buy them, I don’t pay attention to the ORAC, I have many different variety, they are so tasty compare to the store bought version, that’s why I grow them.
I buy mine based on taste and timing so I have some through fall- I mistook your previous post as you being focused on ORAC. I agree that eating them off the bush is many times greater them in the store. I should look into getting an earlier varieties, but I've read that they generally not as tasty. My Honey berries make up for my dearth of blueberries in June.

If you ever have a chance, find some wild blue berries. They are intense.
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Old Today, 10:30 AM
 
Location: Swiftwater, PA
16,421 posts, read 13,187,896 times
Reputation: 12377
Quote:
Originally Posted by fisheye View Post
I have two mulberries that I think just died. One has about a six in diameter trunk and one about a twelve inch diameter trunk. Last year the larger one was missing some of its leaves and this year the larger one has about six leaves on the whole tree. The smaller one has no leaves. Years ago we used to enjoy the fruit; but then we had so many squirrels attack that they left us with none.

There are many diseases that can attack the mulberries (https://www.gardenguides.com/97719-m...-diseases.html). I think mine died from the armillaria root rot because I see some white fungus by the roots.

Now I have two more trees to take down besides the sixty ash trees that died from the emerald ash borer (I already have forty down). At least they are keeping me in shape and keeping the people happy that I give my wood to.
I am posting my one old post here because I was wrong. On 6/18 one of these trees had no leaves and the larger one had only about six leaves. I looked at them again yesterday and both trees now have leaves. Is it that normal for mulberries to take that long to get their leaves? We had a very mild winter and I never remember these trees being that late getting leaves. My hardiness zone is 6A. Could a disease have caused them to be late getting leaves?

This surprised me since I was very close to doing my pruning with a chainsaw. Perhaps I was just a little hasty?
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