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Old 06-09-2020, 02:38 PM
 
Location: So Cal - Orange County
370 posts, read 179,589 times
Reputation: 450

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I have a tomato plant that we started from seeds. It has grown up to about 3-3.5' and each branch had really nice leaves and yellow flowers. After a few days the vine holding each yellow flower will start to turn yellow and then die off. I have had other tomato plants and each time they would product some tomatoes. This plant is in the same location as the previous plants and have been given dirt from our compost and also fertilizer. This plant has not had one tomato even start to grow/develop, the vine start to die and the yellow flower dies soon after.

Any ideas on what could be the cause? Thanks for the input.
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Old 06-09-2020, 11:15 PM
 
Location: SoCal, but itching to relocate
650 posts, read 345,634 times
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Could be the variety, maybe...? Last year, I started 4 different varieties from seed (came in a cute little kit my kids and I started). Two of the four produced, one of which like gangbusters and we even got a crazy-productive voluteer out of that one across the yard which started in October(!), but the other two produced nothing. We started all of them at the same time, seedlings all were promising, all had the same soil (in grow bags), water, fertilizer and sunlight. It was a disappointing mystery to me.
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Old 06-10-2020, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now Rehoboth Beach, DE
8,948 posts, read 11,846,613 times
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Too much water, too much fertilizer???
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Old 06-10-2020, 08:40 AM
 
Location: So Cal - Orange County
370 posts, read 179,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ImmerLernen View Post
Could be the variety, maybe...? Last year, I started 4 different varieties from seed (came in a cute little kit my kids and I started). Two of the four produced, one of which like gangbusters and we even got a crazy-productive voluteer out of that one across the yard which started in October(!), but the other two produced nothing. We started all of them at the same time, seedlings all were promising, all had the same soil (in grow bags), water, fertilizer and sunlight. It was a disappointing mystery to me.
This one is a mystery as we are not doing anything different than we did the previous times where they would grow. There are 3-5 yellow flowers that will grow on each branch and they the slowly die off.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nuts2uiam View Post
Too much water, too much fertilizer???
It gets watered 3 times a week and been fertilized twice since it started to grow. The watering is the same amount/time as the other times we grew tomatoes.
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Old 06-10-2020, 08:51 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
32,336 posts, read 58,955,542 times
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Tomatoes are pollinated by the breezes, and if the weather has been calm you can get into the habit of shaking the branches with flowers 2-3 times a day. Mine are in a greenhouse, and I have a small fan in it to produce wind.


Another problem is too much heat. Tomatoes will not set fruit if over 90F in the daytime, and over 75F at night.
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Old 06-10-2020, 01:04 PM
 
Location: Boston Suburb
2,163 posts, read 5,718,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Tomatoes are pollinated by the breezes, and if the weather has been calm you can get into the habit of shaking the branches with flowers 2-3 times a day. Mine are in a greenhouse, and I have a small fan in it to produce wind.


Another problem is too much heat. Tomatoes will not set fruit if over 90F in the daytime, and over 75F at night.
Didn't know this. Thanks. I'm in the NE, good thing is 90+ temps only last a few days. So is it better to move the plants to a shady spot when it's that hot?
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Old 06-10-2020, 01:08 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
32,336 posts, read 58,955,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mmyk72 View Post
Didn't know this. Thanks. I'm in the NE, good thing is 90+ temps only last a few days. So is it better to move the plants to a shady spot when it's that hot?
I wouldn't bother for just a few days, you would only lose a few tomatoes from flowers that don't pollinate on those days. It hasn't bothered mine which are in a greenhouse, and can be 105F when 80 outside, but only for an hour or so in the afternoon. The real problem is a hot spell of a week or more as happens in the south, especially early in the season like now.
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Old 06-10-2020, 02:32 PM
 
Location: So Cal - Orange County
370 posts, read 179,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Tomatoes are pollinated by the breezes, and if the weather has been calm you can get into the habit of shaking the branches with flowers 2-3 times a day. Mine are in a greenhouse, and I have a small fan in it to produce wind.


Another problem is too much heat. Tomatoes will not set fruit if over 90F in the daytime, and over 75F at night.
Where the plant is located, it gets a decent breeze most days. It has only been in the 90s that last couple of days here. It's been growing for 2-3 months now and the temps have not been in the 90s but 1-3 days since it started to grow.
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Old 06-10-2020, 03:37 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
32,336 posts, read 58,955,542 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teqp View Post
Where the plant is located, it gets a decent breeze most days. It has only been in the 90s that last couple of days here. It's been growing for 2-3 months now and the temps have not been in the 90s but 1-3 days since it started to grow.
That seems to eliminate pollination or weather, so that leaves lack of water, but you would see the leaves and branches droop, oo much or not enough nitrogen, but you have been fertilizing the same as usual. There is also a possibility of insect damage, attacking the blossoms, or even a fungal disease. Since everything else seems the same as previous years, I suspect the insects. The reason most expert advice is to rotate crops especially tomatoes, is that if you get a fungal disease it can stay in the soil over winter, and hit your plants the next spring. Still, in your case you don't see yellowing, spots or dead leaves. Aphids would kill your blossoms but would be visible. Hornworms eat the leaves, and you would see that. There are thrips that are very tiny and cannot be seen without a magnifying glass, that specifically attack blossoms. This could be a possibility. Otherwise, I am out of ideas, despite growing tomatoes for over 50 years. You might try sprinkling diatomacous earth on the branches just before the blossoms and even on the buds before they open. It won't hurt the plant but will kill any crawling creatures.


Good luck.
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Old 06-10-2020, 05:20 PM
 
Location: So Cal - Orange County
370 posts, read 179,589 times
Reputation: 450
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
That seems to eliminate pollination or weather, so that leaves lack of water, but you would see the leaves and branches droop, oo much or not enough nitrogen, but you have been fertilizing the same as usual. There is also a possibility of insect damage, attacking the blossoms, or even a fungal disease. Since everything else seems the same as previous years, I suspect the insects. The reason most expert advice is to rotate crops especially tomatoes, is that if you get a fungal disease it can stay in the soil over winter, and hit your plants the next spring. Still, in your case you don't see yellowing, spots or dead leaves. Aphids would kill your blossoms but would be visible. Hornworms eat the leaves, and you would see that. There are thrips that are very tiny and cannot be seen without a magnifying glass, that specifically attack blossoms. This could be a possibility. Otherwise, I am out of ideas, despite growing tomatoes for over 50 years. You might try sprinkling diatomacous earth on the branches just before the blossoms and even on the buds before they open. It won't hurt the plant but will kill any crawling creatures.


Good luck.
Thank you very much for the help, I appreciate it. Here is a photo of the healthy flowers.

And here is a pic of another set of flowers after a few days, slowly dying off. Actually, you can see a small white bug on the stalk to the right the pic below.
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