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Old Today, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, Texas
11,492 posts, read 11,253,618 times
Reputation: 15741

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For our 80 percent landscaped half acre lot (flower beds and shrubs), we pay $55. This includes mowing, blowing, and edging. It's mostly blowing and edging since there's little grass to mow. He's out there in the hot sun and humidity, so worth every cent as I sure don't want to do it...
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Old Today, 03:16 PM
 
Location: Redwood Shores, CA
733 posts, read 259,107 times
Reputation: 792
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
I wondered about that too but couldn't see if there was any of the lacy, feathery yarrow foliage to go with the flowers. It could actually be one (or more) of any number of the umbelliferae plants in the Apiaceae family, including poisonous hemlock or many wild plants like carrot, celery, angelica, coriander, etc. But like you say it doesn't matter now.

The property has apparently been allowed to go fallow and wild by previous owners for so long before the OP took possession of it that everything in there now is feral stuff that has to be cleared out and renewed with other vegetation before OP can put livestock on or do anything else to develop it besides brush cutting it every year.

OP, you have your work cut out for you on that property.

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I only need to worry about 1/3 acre of vegetation which is mainly this foxtail plant. At some point I will have them dug up completely and turn the space into raised beds. The rest I am not allowed to touch anyway; must let it grow freely, as I know all previous owners had done.

I looked up yarrow... If I did not mistaken wiki info, this is considered a beneficial plant? Seems this place has some poisonous plants, but also some medicinal plants. An Indian old man once told me "where you find a poisonous plant, nearby must be another plant that can counter it"... Don't know how true that is, but I have been pretty curious about all the plants there, and there are many.

I went to my picture archive and dug up pictures of some of the plants I have found there. See if anyone can identify them and share any info about them.

Plant #1 (another grass looking plant; 2-3' tall, think leaves, with dangling seeds on top)

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01975b.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01976.jpg
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Old Today, 03:20 PM
 
Location: Redwood Shores, CA
733 posts, read 259,107 times
Reputation: 792
Plant #2

2-3' tall, circular shape plant with a diameter about 3'.

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01882-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01923-curley-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01938-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc06270-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01885-curly-leaves2-large-.jpg
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Old Today, 03:29 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,217 posts, read 7,785,426 times
Reputation: 19113
I think that Plant #1 might be tall Cheat Grass, the seed pods as yet unopened. An invasive on the west coast and highly flammable. You can find information here: https://www.nps.gov/seki/learn/nature/nnp_plants.htm

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Old Today, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Redwood Shores, CA
733 posts, read 259,107 times
Reputation: 792
Plant #3

This one is a a thistle, is that correct? Any further info is appreciated.

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc02351-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc02359-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc02364-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc02354-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc02353-large-.jpg
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Old Today, 03:39 PM
 
Location: Redwood Shores, CA
733 posts, read 259,107 times
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Plant #4

A very nasty vine. Leaves look dirty, and the vine has thorns all over. Biggest leaves are the size of a half dollar coin. Thickest vine about 1/2" in diameter. It tripped me several times and I fell into the patch.

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc00785-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc06269-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc06274-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc00784-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc06441.jpg
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Old Today, 03:39 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,217 posts, read 7,785,426 times
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Plant #2 is Pacific coast Sword fern, a very common fern for the region and good for holding topsoil together to prevent erosion. NOT edible or medicinal but still a good plant for helping to retain moisture and nutrients in the ground. Mind you, there are so many types of ferns indigenous to the Pacific coast regions that you'd need a PNW fern book to identify them all.

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Old Today, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Redwood Shores, CA
733 posts, read 259,107 times
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Plant #5

Leave looks like a disk; plant height about 6" (basically running on the ground)

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01895-disk-large-.jpg
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Old Today, 03:56 PM
 
Location: Redwood Shores, CA
733 posts, read 259,107 times
Reputation: 792
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Plant #2 is Pacific coast Sword fern, a very common fern for the region and good for holding topsoil together to prevent erosion. NOT edible or medicinal but still a good plant for helping to retain moisture and nutrients in the ground. Mind you, there are so many types of ferns indigenous to the Pacific coast regions that you'd need a PNW fern book to identify them all.

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Comments about whether a plant has value or not is appreciated. The useless ones or bad ones I want to try to get rid of them, like this one:

Plant #6

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01975-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01977-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01981-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01982-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc01987-large-.jpg

-45/hr to mow the grass - is that a bit steep?-dsc02369-large-.jpg
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Old Today, 03:58 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,217 posts, read 7,785,426 times
Reputation: 19113
Yes # 3 is a thistle, I think that one may be listed in the above website I posted.

# 4, believe it or not that is a south coast form of Himalayan blackberry bramble, a vicious invasive brought to the west coast from Europe in the 1800's, and the further south down the coast it grows the smaller and scrubbier the leaves become and the more prickles it gets on the vine. The further north up the coast it grows, the bigger the leaves become, covered with prickles on the undersides of the leaves and the vines are thicker and as strong as rope, some as thick as a grown man's wrist, and the prickles become huge spiney thorns up to 2" long that can rip you to shreds. So abundant in berries on the west coast they have rapidly become spread by birds from California to Alaska. They are stranglers that will cover and destroy any plant or man-made structure that gets in their way, rapid growers in spring and summer, can grow 1 to 2 feet per day.

#5 with the disc shaped leaf I believe is west coast red honeysuckle but I could be wrong about that.

You should look up some websites about native plants of the PNW. Here is one that I like and keep on my favourites list for quick reference: https://northernbushcraft.com/

.
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