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Old 07-02-2020, 09:21 AM
 
Location: North Idaho
24,735 posts, read 32,426,195 times
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It's cold here. Growing season is short. My son has offered to buy a greenhouse.

He is looking at a large poly carbonate with aluminum frame made by Clima Pod Greenhouses. Their website looks good, but I'm not finding any reviews. It's a bunch of money to spend on something I don't get to see before buying.

Does anyone know that company, or have any advice on greenhouses? I was expecting a little bitty thing for a couple of tomato plants and he is looking at a 9X42 for a large assortment of veggies.
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Old 07-02-2020, 09:54 AM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
4,073 posts, read 1,590,620 times
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Good question.

To grow plants, you need light and heat. Winter in northern areas, of course, is short on both. A greenhouse is intended to let in natural sunlight, hopefully to avoid the cost of running artificial light, and then also traps any artificial heating you may need to supply.

At your location, you will get too cold over night to rely on natural heat built up during the day, so you will have to provide heat...I don't know the weather patterns in your area, but I know I was able to extend my growing season in Chicago by almost three months with a simple high tunnel. But when I moved 250 miles north to WI, temps aren't all that much different, but cloud coverage was so different that cold frames/high tunnels are almost useless. Not enough sunlight to heat things up even during the day and not enough light for good growing

Next, consider expense of the operation vs the money you would save growing your own. An operation big enough to give you more than just a taste of a couple servings is probably cost prohibitive-- unless you go whole hog and run a commercial operation.

Personally, learning from my experience with light/heat availability here, I'm turning a corner of my attached (heated) garage into a growing area. I use it that way for my tomato & pepper seed starts in Feb anyway. Now I'll just make it permanent so I can grow lettuce & spinach all winter.

Two other possibilities to consider: build your own greenhouse with re-purposed old windows (maybe check with a window installer/remodeling outfit for stuff headed for the dump) &/or consider digging down to build a walipini to let geothermal give you a boost.https://www.bing.com/search?q=walipi...ANNTA1&PC=U531
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Old 07-02-2020, 11:24 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,266 posts, read 7,812,142 times
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https://climapod.com/

Here's their testimonials from customers page: https://climapod.com/testimonials/

I like the 6mm PC more than the 4mm PC (for additional insulation and durability under snow weight) and I like their Virtue series. If it's just for yourself alone a 42 footer will probably be too long for you and will be more costly to heat in winter if you have indoor plants in there during winter. Unless you plan to multi-purpose it and put in divider(s) and use other section(s) of it as reserve space / workshop / garden & tool storage shed / meditation room / hobby crafts room / or ~whatever~, with space heaters in the divided sections. So then even when you aren't using the divided sections for yourself, the plant section will still be easier to keep warm in winter.

If you don't intend to utilize the extra space for any other things then you'll probably find the 21 footer is adequate for your personal growing purposes and easier to manipulate and manage the indoor climate during hot summer months. They can get really hot and overly bright in summer because of that highly reflective material so you need to think carefully about placement outdoors. I'd suggest that it be positioned so one end of the greenhouse is placed where it gets part sun and part shade from trees and the other end is in full, direct sunlight all day. If you have no shade trees for one end of it you'll probably have to invest in a good shade cloth to put over one end of it. But REAL partial shade that shifts and moves with the sun's daily passage is better for part shade plants rather than the steady, unmoving shade cast by an immobile shade cloth.

You definitely need the louvres for air freshening and circulation of moisture/condensation, and I don't know about the solar fan but I'm assuming it may sometimes be iffy in hot, muggy but cloudy days. You'll still want to put a bigger, mobile oscillating fan in there anyway, something that really moves the air around and can push hot air out the sliding doors if necessary or blow air from outside into the greenhouse. So proximity to electrical sources and extension cord lengths for appliances and winter grow-lights in the greenhouse, plus water source and hoses to the greenhouse, are all things to keep in consideration with regard to placement of the greenhouse outside.

Personally I prefer a greenhouse of any size to have doors at both ends, it's much more practical and I think safer too. If I was going to order one of their 42 ft greenhouses I'd ask for my kit to have 2 door ends instead of 1 door end and one fully enclosed end.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 07-02-2020 at 11:59 AM..
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Old 07-02-2020, 01:08 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
32,477 posts, read 59,166,724 times
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Mine is 7'x12', and 7' high. I built it myself for about $300, using 2x6 cedar for the base and hold in the soil, 12" rebar inserted into drilled holes, then PVC Pipe bent with T's, X's holding together the frame. The clear plastic has held up for 5 years, but I plan to change it out next spring. It was actually a fun project. I have all of my tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, bell peppers, snow peas and asparagus in there on a drip system with a timer. I do have to hand pollinate the cucs, peppers and zucs, though, with the lack of bees going in even when the door is open.
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Old 07-05-2020, 06:19 PM
 
7,313 posts, read 9,009,342 times
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I think 42' long sounds excessive for your needs. Look into building a smaller one on your own. Around here, lots of people give away old storm windows--which is what I would use instead of plastic. Or you could use the corrugated polycarbonate plastic panels which would last longer than sheet plastic.
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Old 07-06-2020, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
73,203 posts, read 56,660,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oregonwoodsmoke View Post
It's cold here. Growing season is short. My son has offered to buy a greenhouse.

He is looking at a large poly carbonate with aluminum frame made by Clima Pod Greenhouses. Their website looks good, but I'm not finding any reviews. It's a bunch of money to spend on something I don't get to see before buying.

Does anyone know that company, or have any advice on greenhouses? I was expecting a little bitty thing for a couple of tomato plants and he is looking at a 9X42 for a large assortment of veggies.
What company? How much are you growing?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Mine is 7'x12', and 7' high. I built it myself for about $300, using 2x6 cedar for the base and hold in the soil, 12" rebar inserted into drilled holes, then PVC Pipe bent with T's, X's holding together the frame. The clear plastic has held up for 5 years, but I plan to change it out next spring. It was actually a fun project. I have all of my tomatoes, cucumbers, zucchini, bell peppers, snow peas and asparagus in there on a drip system with a timer. I do have to hand pollinate the cucs, peppers and zucs, though, with the lack of bees going in even when the door is open.
Very cool! I think I remember you posting pictures of the building process. How come the plants are still in there? I've always wanted one so I didn't have to start "indoors" but the thought about regulating heat and airflow in there gets me thinking twice since our temps fluctuate a lot I don't have time to constantly attend to it. Would be fun to have though.
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Old 07-06-2020, 07:37 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
32,477 posts, read 59,166,724 times
Reputation: 35580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Very cool! I think I remember you posting pictures of the building process. How come the plants are still in there? I've always wanted one so I didn't have to start "indoors" but the thought about regulating heat and airflow in there gets me thinking twice since our temps fluctuate a lot I don't have time to constantly attend to it. Would be fun to have though.
Deer, rabbit, squirrels, raccoons, crows. I have to keep them protected and hand pollinate or everything will get eaten in our woodsy area, with lots of wildlife around. We also have coyotes and even bears but they don't bother my plants. I had to move the roses into the fenced back because the deer ate off all the leaves. I have installed a turbine ventilator and solar fan so that the temperature doesn't get too hot, and I have some air movement for the tomatoes to pollinate.
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Old 07-06-2020, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
73,203 posts, read 56,660,810 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hemlock140 View Post
Deer, rabbit, squirrels, raccoons, crows. I have to keep them protected
?. We got all that on a daily basis.. I'm convinced my compost pile and nature around us is the reason why they dont touch my garden. Dont get me wrong, they do at times, but I like to share. lol. The only thing that's taken are the tomatoes sometimes.

Why not build a fence around a garden bed to protect. Good thing about keeping them in there is its protected from hail and strong winds but doesnt get the magic rain water. Unless you save some rainwater.
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Old 07-06-2020, 08:36 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
32,477 posts, read 59,166,724 times
Reputation: 35580
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
?. We got all that on a daily basis.. I'm convinced my compost pile and nature around us is the reason why they dont touch my garden. Dont get me wrong, they do at times, but I like to share. lol. The only thing that's taken are the tomatoes sometimes.

Why not build a fence around a garden bed to protect. Good thing about keeping them in there is its protected from hail and strong winds but doesnt get the magic rain water. Unless you save some rainwater.
I tried the fence, it stopped the rabbits and deer, but squirrels and crows still get in.
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Old 07-06-2020, 10:55 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,266 posts, read 7,812,142 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post

Why not build a fence around a garden bed to protect. Good thing about keeping them in there is its protected from hail and strong winds but doesnt get the magic rain water. Unless you save some rainwater.
LOL. I take it you've never experienced life in back country Washington.

Unless they're made of concrete and standing 20 feet high with razor wire at the top, there are no garden fences that keep out determined animals like bears, elk, moose, deer, raccoons, porcupines and big cats like cougars. If they don't climb or jump over fences they just knock them down or bulldoze through them.

A greenhouse protects plants from too much rain as well (remember, he's in Washington) - like non-stop 40 days and 40 nights or more worth of rain kind of thing. And from the slugs that come with the rain.

PS - see the first two lines in post #3 for the name and website of the company that OWS was asking about.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 07-06-2020 at 11:34 AM..
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