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Old Today, 06:17 AM
 
Location: NY>FL>VA>NC>IN
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Hey guys.
I'm in Fort Wayne, IN zone 5/6 depending on which chart I look at.

I have two urn shaped concrete planters on the front porch that came with the house; the front faces North but that area of the porch actually gets a fair amount of direct sunlight.

These old planters have no drainage holes and are around 24 in deep by maybe 18in diameter.

I'd like to put something evergreen in there so they look nice year round. Any ideas? I like hardy and low maintenance kind of stuff.
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Old Today, 11:28 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Personally I wouldn't attempt to grow anything in concrete containers of that small size and shape that I'd expect to live for any length of time. Concrete kind of does a toxic number on the soil and plants' roots after awhile and then kills the plants. Maybe hens 'n' chicks, or ivy might last for a year or two, but even that is doubtful.

I don't believe those kinds of concrete containers are made for planting living plants directly in them anyway, I think they're designed for placing plant pots into, or synthetic plants, or man made decorations that you have designed yourself or bought at a store and can replace seasonally. Synthetic is low maintenance.

If I had something like that I'd use them to contain plant pots with live flowering annual plants in them and change them out with seasonal replacements at the changing of the seasons.

.
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Old Today, 11:39 AM
 
Location: NY>FL>VA>NC>IN
3,222 posts, read 1,252,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Personally I wouldn't attempt to grow anything in concrete containers of that small size and shape that I'd expect to live for any length of time. Concrete kind of does a toxic number on the soil and plants' roots after awhile and then kills the plants. Maybe hens 'n' chicks, or ivy might last for a year or two, but even that is doubtful.

I don't believe those kinds of concrete containers are made for planting living plants directly in them anyway, I think they're designed for placing plant pots into, or synthetic plants, or man made decorations that you have designed yourself or bought at a store and can replace seasonally. Synthetic is low maintenance.

If I had something like that I'd use them to contain plant pots with live flowering annual plants in them and change them out with seasonal replacements at the changing of the seasons.

.
Yeah, I don't like how they haven't drainage holes.

Currently there are two junipers in them that have been in there forever, from what I can tell from photos of the place (I've only lived in the house since March). I pruned them into a nice shape but they look sickly and awful. My thought it to move the junipers to a bed and see if they perk up.

What you say about putting removable pots in them makes sense, I hadn't thought of that. Doh!

I don't like annuals, I do have thriving hens and chicks on the other side of the house, but I want something tall in these. They are HEAVY, I cannot move them and they look icky at present with the sickly juniper and will look icky empty, too, I think.
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Old Today, 12:28 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VexedAndSolitary View Post
Yeah, I don't like how they haven't drainage holes.

Currently there are two junipers in them that have been in there forever, from what I can tell from photos of the place (I've only lived in the house since March). I pruned them into a nice shape but they look sickly and awful. My thought it to move the junipers to a bed and see if they perk up.

What you say about putting removable pots in them makes sense, I hadn't thought of that. Doh!

I don't like annuals, I do have thriving hens and chicks on the other side of the house, but I want something tall in these. They are HEAVY, I cannot move them and they look icky at present with the sickly juniper and will look icky empty, too, I think.
Yes, you need to get the junipers out of there ASAP. Junipers do best in well draining, neutral to acidic soil. Concrete minerals and salts leach into soil and makes the soil incredibly alkaline and salty which is very bad for junipers, so that is probably why they are looking sick. They're slowly being alkalined and salted to death. When you take the junipers out, shake off as much soil as possible from the roots before planting them into well draining ground soil. Water them in well upon first planting so the bared roots will settle in place and establish well in the new planting site. You should observe them starting to perk up and produce some healthier looking foliage inside of a month.

.
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Old Today, 02:02 PM
 
Location: NY>FL>VA>NC>IN
3,222 posts, read 1,252,070 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Yes, you need to get the junipers out of there ASAP. Junipers do best in well draining, neutral to acidic soil. Concrete minerals and salts leach into soil and makes the soil incredibly alkaline and salty which is very bad for junipers, so that is probably why they are looking sick. They're slowly being alkalined and salted to death. When you take the junipers out, shake off as much soil as possible from the roots before planting them into well draining ground soil. Water them in well upon first planting so the bared roots will settle in place and establish well in the new planting site. You should observe them starting to perk up and produce some healthier looking foliage inside of a month.

.
What's odd is these same mini shrubs have been there since at least 2011 going by photos (owner I bought from had house since 1980); along with MASSIVE junipers in the back, not pruned in decades, I pruned the heck out of those. Anyhow, yeah, I'm waiting til the next good rain and shall move them then so the ground they go into is soaked, it's so dry here these days the ground is rather concrete-like atm.

So if I use removable pots, any ideas for some evergreen shrub type thing I could put in there that'll get tall-ish?
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Old Today, 03:00 PM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,260 posts, read 7,804,972 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VexedAndSolitary View Post

So if I use removable pots, any ideas for some evergreen shrub type thing I could put in there that'll get tall-ish?
Other than the suggestions I already made, I guess if I was going to do something like that in your growing zone I'd want to choose an evergreen dwarf shrub that will give me an assortment of colours throughout all 4 seasons of the year. Just for variety, you know? So I'd look for one of the several varieties of dwarf Pieris Japonica shrubs. They're beautiful, hardy plants, the flowers smell awesome and attract lots of pollinators to them and hence to other plants in the gardens as well, and they change throughout the year.

Here is what they look like: https://www.google.ca/search?q=dwarf...w=1342&bih=682

Alternatively you could go to a local tree/shrub nursery and ask for their suggestions. They will be more knowledgeable about what types of evergreen plants will grow in above ground containers in partial shade in your particular locality's plant hardiness and climate zone.

If you want something dwarf that will still get quite tallish and spire-like then you could be looking at something in the thuja family.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=dwarf...h=682&biw=1342

https://savvygardening.com/small-evergreen-shrubs/

Dwarf azaleas and rhododendrons might be other possibilities but I don't know how well they would do in such small pots - your concrete planters aren't really big enough I think.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; Today at 03:10 PM..
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