U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Covid-19 Information Page
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-21-2020, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Connecticut is my adopted home.
2,333 posts, read 3,289,323 times
Reputation: 7281

Advertisements

I have a garden bed on the west side of our house, north of a massive chimney so the spot gets maybe three-four hours of sun but hot sun. I would like a shrub or something of size, 5' or under that would perform decently there in that corner area. I thought about hydrangea but they wilt so in the afternoon heat in the sun here. I also thought about Rose of Sharon but it might get rangy or need constant pruning to keep it in bounds and they also tend to show stress and wilt in the heat. I like the idea of Mock Orange but it might not be enough sun.

I inherited a tangled mass of miniaturized and unkempt astilbe, yellow archangel and heuchera when we bought the house blah. I dug it all out, relocated the better plants, fed the compost pile and temporarily planted lilies but they need more sun. The only thing that seems happy there is pulmonaria but that's only good for the front of the bed. Looking for suggestions.

I'm in CT, zone 6b, the spot stays moist, our summers are humid, medium hot. Winters milder than the midwest.

Thanks in advance.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-23-2020, 06:57 AM
 
Location: Connecticut is my adopted home.
2,333 posts, read 3,289,323 times
Reputation: 7281
Am I stumping the band? I've done some research and I'm stumped too. Was hoping for some insight. IMO it's the heat that happens for 4 hours a day that is the real problem versus the shade.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2020, 07:28 AM
 
Location: NC
7,592 posts, read 9,578,763 times
Reputation: 15991
Your microclimate might allow a plant from a slightly more southern zone maybe 7. The brick chimney will retain heat in the winter but of course it will add to the “baking” in the summer. Perhaps lygustrum with its waxy leaves?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2020, 09:34 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,749 posts, read 8,065,405 times
Reputation: 20526
I'd put in an evergreen herb plant that will mature into a good sized shrub and is tolerant of high afternoon heat.

A rosemary shrub would be my first choice and there are several varieties to choose from. Rosemary is a lot more adaptable to light and heat conditions than they get credit for. For purely ornamental purposes I'd choose one that is known for putting out a profuse amount of flowers for long periods. Sunset has this list of different types of rosemary shrubs to select from: https://www.sunset.com/garden/flower...semary-for-you

Another evergreen herb I like just for appearance is Santolina, it is medicinal, not a culinary herb, but its foliage is uniquely attractive and it has a pleasant camphorish scent. It doesn't get really tall though, no more than 3 feet. Likewise with sage shrubs. Then there is also curry plant which in the right location and with no competition from other plants can grow into a good sized shrub, and it is culinary, attractive, and the scent makes you hungry for curry when you pass by.

Another thing to consider is berry bushes, or shrubs that are grown strictly for their foliage rather than for flowers.

The location you're describing is one I would consider trying a bigleaf mop head hydrangea as an experiment even in spite of the 4 hours of intense afternoon heat that it gets. Those hydrangeas also are more heat tolerant than they are given credit for.

.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2020, 10:06 AM
 
Location: British Columbia ~🌄 ☀️ ♥ 🍁 ♥ ☀️🌄~
9,749 posts, read 8,065,405 times
Reputation: 20526
Oh, and here is one more that would likely do very well in that location, Rosa Rugosa. But you would likely have to keep it trimmed back every year.

.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-23-2020, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
40,262 posts, read 49,776,867 times
Reputation: 68881
How about one of the viburnums? Chinese snowball, maybe? They are pretty indestructible. Find a variety that works in your zone.

Last edited by gentlearts; 08-23-2020 at 01:54 PM..
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2020, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Connecticut is my adopted home.
2,333 posts, read 3,289,323 times
Reputation: 7281
Many thanks to all.

The waxy leave thing has me thinking about a few things, maybe holly? I'm also thinking about northern highbush blueberries in the entire bed as the soil here is pretty acidic, keeping those berries close to the house would lessen critter harvest.

I like the herb idea but would rosemary tolerate occasional 5 degree plunges in cold winters? I have a large 7 year old rosemary topiary that I keep in our year round sunroom in the winter and I always brought it in when the night temps fell into the 30s. I know rosemary will tolerate a mild frost but will it take consistent freezing of high ground 600' in southern CT?

Finally if blueberries won't work, the rugosa rose will be a winner as I miss the ones I left in AK. I'm particularly fond of Therese Bugnet but it might get too hot here for it and I need to see what can stand some shade.

I do have an old fashioned mop head hydrangea in the back, about 10 feet south of the chimney and while lovely it wilts through our hot sunny middays in the summer even with plenty of water. I hate stressing out another plant.

I'll research the viburnums but I thought most of those got pretty tall. A garden I'm partially responsible for on our town green, the snowball bush is at least 12' tall.

I'm not going to dig the lilies and clear out the bed until the weather cools down but I would like to take advantage of end of season sales if I can find the right plants. I have a lot of research to do but this has given me some direction. I appreciate the input very much.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2020, 07:27 AM
 
Location: NC
7,592 posts, read 9,578,763 times
Reputation: 15991
Unfortunately soil near foundations where there are bricks, mortar, and cement or limestone are always high pH. That is, non-acidic. Blueberries would not do well.
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2020, 07:59 AM
 
Location: SoCal
19,018 posts, read 8,962,568 times
Reputation: 15807
How about a tree peony?
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-26-2020, 08:36 AM
 
10,442 posts, read 3,909,902 times
Reputation: 23899
How about a butterfly bush?


Likes the heat
Likes well drained moist soil
Likes partial shade
Rate this post positively Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 08:01 AM.

© 2005-2020, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top