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Old 12-13-2020, 01:20 PM
 
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We have a Jade plant that looks very healthy, at least to me, however the wife is concerned after the plant has dropped 3 leaves. We keep it by an East facing window and water it about every two weeks or so.

Wondering if the pots too small, however I’ve read that these plants prefer to be root bound. Thanks!

Last edited by Rickcin; 02-15-2021 at 06:49 AM..
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Old 12-13-2020, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Old Hippie Heaven
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It looks OK to me, maybe a little bit on the dry side, but that won't hurt it. Much better for it to be a little too dry rather than a little too wet.

Jades do fine rootbound, and it's a good way to limit their size. But it still wants to grow new leaves, and since you're limiting the amount of water available to it by limiting the size of the rootball, it has to drop older leaves in order to supply adequate water to the newer leaves. What will eventually happen to yours is that it will become more tree-like - it will have stout, barren trunks with leaves concentrated near the top. Many people, including me, like the resulting architectural look.

Especially when the days are longer, you could water it once a week, and keep those lower leaves for a longer period of time. But eventually, they're going to drop.

Or you could pot up a size, giving it a little more room. Or you could cut it back to maybe about 4 inches from the soil surface and let it grow a new top.

Last edited by jacqueg; 12-13-2020 at 01:41 PM..
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Old 12-13-2020, 02:11 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
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Nice healthy looking plant. I agree with everything Jacqueg said.

However, I think it's starting to look top heavy enough now that it could tip over. So if it was mine I would re-pot it into a slightly larger non-tapered clay pot that has a base that is as wide across as the mouth of the pot is. Before re-potting put a few small stones at the bottom of the new pot to give it a bit more weight at the bottom so there's less likelihood of it tipping over as it grows larger and heavier. Keep in mind that's a lot of water-weight that it's carrying in the leaves.

.
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Old 12-16-2020, 01:01 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Illinois
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plants with large leaves tend to love moisture. And just watering the substrate is not enough for them. Try sprinkling the leaves with water at least once a day and observe the dynamics. It should get better.
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Old 12-18-2020, 06:51 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Nice healthy looking plant. I agree with everything Jacqueg said.

However, I think it's starting to look top heavy enough now that it could tip over. So if it was mine I would re-pot it into a slightly larger non-tapered clay pot that has a base that is as wide across as the mouth of the pot is. Before re-potting put a few small stones at the bottom of the new pot to give it a bit more weight at the bottom so there's less likelihood of it tipping over as it grows larger and heavier. Keep in mind that's a lot of water-weight that it's carrying in the leaves.

.
It would definitely be happier in a larger pot. Water thoroughly afterwards and then start checking the soil after a week. It should be less thirsty till its roots fill out again. I water mine about once a week and avoid letting it stand in water.

When they get old and fussy, you have to be more careful about overwatering but yours is still actively growing.
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Old 12-19-2020, 08:28 PM
 
Location: South-Western USA , desert
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beatrice_mom View Post
plants with large leaves tend to love moisture. And just watering the substrate is not enough for them. Try sprinkling the leaves with water at least once a day and observe the dynamics. It should get better.

"[Healthy] humidity in the home runs about 40% to 50%, which is just perfect for the desert-growing jade plant. Jade plants will generally tolerate a wide range of humidity levels, but try to avoid excessively high levels.

"If your home is very humid, keep your jade plant closer to heaters and air conditioners where the air is a little bit dryer. Keep your jade plant in a room that gets good circulation, as well.. . ." https://smartgardenguide.com/jade-pl...rassula-ovata/
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Old 12-22-2020, 07:49 AM
 
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Well, I’ve since repotted the plant to a pot that’s just one size larger and although I took extreme care in handling the plant and root ball, a good size branch broke off cleanly from the main trunk!

You can see from the photo where the large branch detached from the main trunk.

Guess there was some kind of structural issue since I was definitely very careful ❗️

Last edited by Rickcin; 02-05-2021 at 07:19 PM..
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Old 12-22-2020, 02:17 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rickcin View Post
Well, I’ve since repotted the plant to a pot that’s just one size larger and although I took extreme care in handling the plant and root ball, a good size branch broke off cleanly from the main trunk!

You can see from the photo where the large branch detached from the main trunk.

Guess there was some kind of structural issue since I was definitely very careful ❗️
Did you stick the broken branch into another pot of soil for it to take root in? That's what I do when branches break off, or whenever I prune branch tips off my jades to encourage more branching on their ends.

That new pot is perfect, I think you couldn't have chosen anything better for a jade than that style with the attached drip base. And it's a really classy looking, nice coloured pot too.

Now if I may make one more suggestion. And it's just a suggestion, not a necessity that needs to be followed. You have one more branch on the plant that looks to be at risk of breaking off because it is off balance and becoming too heavy on its far end. It is the lowest big branch that is growing horizontally away from the main trunk. It's shown pointing towards the left in the original post #1 picture before being repotted, and it also points to the left in the 2nd picture in post # 7.

It has one offshoot growing vertically straight up off that main horizontal branch and beyond that vertical offshoot branch there is still the end of that branch that is growing horizontally. My suggestion is to prune off the heaviest part, the remainder of the horizontal branch, and cut it off just beyond the node where the vertical offshoot is growing upwards. That will help to bring balance of shape to the whole plant and will reduce the risk of the entire horizontal branch breaking off from the main stem and root base at ground level.

If you choose to do that it will encourage branching and new vertical growth on that vertical branch and you can put the pruned off section into another pot to take root. Just strip off the bottom leaf on that pruned stem and make sure that leaf node on the stem is below ground level because the leaf nodes are where the new roots will emerge from. If you still have the piece that broke off the main stem when you repotted the plant you can do the same thing with that broken piece.

You can do it with leaves that break off too, just stick the bottom tip of the leaf into soil and new roots will grow from the tip. Dropping fresh leaves is one of the methods that jade plants use to propagate new baby plants off themselves in the hopes that the bottom tip of a leaf will come into contact with the ground and grow roots.

.
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Old 12-22-2020, 02:48 PM
 
4,930 posts, read 2,069,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Did you stick the broken branch into another pot of soil for it to take root in? That's what I do when branches break off, or whenever I prune branch tips off my jades to encourage more branching on their ends.

That new pot is perfect, I think you couldn't have chosen anything better for a jade than that style with the attached drip base. And it's a really classy looking, nice coloured pot too.

Now if I may make one more suggestion. And it's just a suggestion, not a necessity that needs to be followed. You have one more branch on the plant that looks to be at risk of breaking off because it is off balance and becoming too heavy on its far end. It is the lowest big branch that is growing horizontally away from the main trunk. It's shown pointing towards the left in the original post #1 picture before being repotted, and it also points to the left in the 2nd picture in post # 7.

It has one offshoot growing vertically straight up off that main horizontal branch and beyond that vertical offshoot branch there is still the end of that branch that is growing horizontally. My suggestion is to prune off the heaviest part, the remainder of the horizontal branch, and cut it off just beyond the node where the vertical offshoot is growing upwards. That will help to bring balance of shape to the whole plant and will reduce the risk of the entire horizontal branch breaking off from the main stem and root base at ground level.

If you choose to do that it will encourage branching and new vertical growth on that vertical branch and you can put the pruned off section into another pot to take root. Just strip off the bottom leaf on that pruned stem and make sure that leaf node on the stem is below ground level because the leaf nodes are where the new roots will emerge from. If you still have the piece that broke off the main stem when you repotted the plant you can do the same thing with that broken piece.

You can do it with leaves that break off too, just stick the bottom tip of the leaf into soil and new roots will grow from the tip. Dropping fresh leaves is one of the methods that jade plants use to propagate new baby plants off themselves in the hopes that the bottom tip of a leaf will come into contact with the ground and grow roots.

.
Glad you like my choice of pots! I was able to find it at Lowe’s but obviously not cheap and I did plant all of the cuttings and some leaves as well as one cutting I placed in a jar of water and another one in the sun so the end seals over.

Anyway, here is a photo of the plant at the ground level. It appears as there are almost two separate trunks, the one main one to the right and the two smaller ones to the left which has that low lying horizontal branch.


Perhaps that whole section should be removed?

Thanks so very much

Last edited by Rickcin; 02-05-2021 at 07:18 PM..
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Old 12-22-2020, 06:46 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
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No, I wouldn't cut the whole section off, I think that could cause more harm than good. What you have there are 3 main leader trunks attached together growing out of a single crown and root system and one of the leaders is more horizontal than the other two and has a heavy cluster of leaves at its end weighing it down.

But the 3 leaders need each other because they strengthen the crown and they're supporting each other with nutrients exchange. Also if you cut off anything that close to the crown/roots it will take longer for the cut to dry and close off so you risk bacteria or other 'uglies' getting introduced into the crown through the cut and thence into the rest of the plant. I just meant cut off the heavy cluster of leaves and part of their stem at the far end of the most horizontal leader so the weight of the cluster doesn't make the whole leader stem break off.

.
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