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Old 05-06-2008, 01:56 AM
 
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I've got a very old walnut tree that I'm guessing is 100 yrs old because its so wide I can't get my arms around. By neighbors accounts this tree still produces. Problem is ivy grew up 3/4 length of the whole tree and the home inspector advised me to cut the tree down because of the ivy, the slope it's on, and potential for undermining my foundation. Google says they only last 70 yrs.

I really love this tree and would rather keep it so I'm cutting the roots of the ivy to starve it off, but I'm wondering if I'll have to climb to pull it all off the trunks. Will it just rot off by itself, or will the vines not break down and continue to choke? This tree is taller than 3 stories of the house.
I'm also not sure if its a neccessary expense to hire a pro arborist to trim it back away from the house, or even what a fair price for their work would be. Not sure how healthy it is or isn't.
Any suggestions?
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Old 05-06-2008, 11:25 AM
 
Location: Floribama
18,576 posts, read 40,189,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harborlady View Post
Google says they only last 70 yrs.
Don't believe that, these trees can live well over one hundred years. I would go ahead and cut back the ivy, maybe even spray some of it with Brush-B-Gone. The dead ivy hanging in the tree will eventually get brittle and fall down, but it will take awhile. I had to do the same thing with wisteria in a oak tree. It might be wise to get a certified arborist (not a tree trimmer) to come and check the tree out, just to make sure it's roots are in good shape.
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Old 05-06-2008, 01:42 PM
 
Location: NE Florida
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You can also call your local extension office and speak to the Urban Forester agent
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Old 05-06-2008, 02:36 PM
 
11,946 posts, read 14,219,315 times
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thanks for the advice. That extension office would fit right in my budget. I hope I won't need an arborist because I need to put the money in the house, but I'd be worried about letting any old yahoo with a chainsaw hurt it. I'm too chicken to climb myself.
The google hits about it seem to lean more toward looking at these trees as timber/veneer worth. What a shame.
I came across this entertaining cultivator of walnuts story if anyone cares for a chuckle.
Growing and Processing Black Walnuts
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