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Old 02-14-2021, 02:37 PM
 
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Could be small ring necks by heck.
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Old 02-14-2021, 02:56 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bagster View Post
Do the baby snakes have a lime-green tail?
Not all, but some species do.

Beautiful corn snake there! I love finding them. Interestly, if you turn them over, they have a checkerboard pattern of black and white on their little undersides.
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Old 02-14-2021, 03:04 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
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Originally Posted by carnivalday View Post
Not all, but some species do
The baby snakes you'll run into in the Carolinas with green or yellow tail tips are copperheads and moccasins.
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Old 02-14-2021, 03:21 PM
 
Location: B.C.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carnivalday View Post
Not all, but some species do.

Beautiful corn snake there! I love finding them. Interestly, if you turn them over, they have a checkerboard pattern of black and white on their little undersides.
They do! They have such beautiful markings and colors on their heads and all over on them, so attractive. I just looked up information about corn snakes to find out why they are called corn snakes. The Wikipedia info I looked at explained the reason why and it also has pictures of them including one picture of a young Okeetee Phase corn snake that shows the checkerboard pattern of black and white on the underside. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corn_snake

.
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Old 02-14-2021, 04:57 PM
 
59,613 posts, read 46,522,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by howard555 View Post
We don't have a garden and the common poisonous in our area is the copperhead. Close to water maybe cottonmouth or water moccasin. We had a friend bitten and in her effort to back away fell and broke her leg. Type of snake we don't know. Relative found a black snake in the bath tub a couple years ago and another type of snake (unknown) came down the chimney last year.


I also forgot the beautiful but deadly coral snake seen in pine trees, etc.

"The beautiful, highly venomous coral snake takes its name from its bright colors, reminiscent of those found in some species of coral. It is North Carolina’s only member of the cobra family and our only snake with strictly neurotoxic venom" from ncwildlife.org.
Hard to say, cotton mouth = water moccasin = agkistrodon piscivorus (latin name translates to fish eater)

Generally babies of those species and copperheads have HUGE heads relative to body, unlike the ringneck which is shaped like an earth worm.

https://www.reddit.com/r/pics/commen...y_cottonmouth/

We're talking Stewie from Family Guy sized heads lol.

Last tidbits:

1. Always be careful with coral snakes, there are rare variants that lack one of the colors so the whole red touch yellow kill a fellow doesn't apply and people think they're something harmless like a kingsnake.

2. If you or someone with you gets bit by a copperhead, don't go too nuts unless you have signs of anaphalactic shock (primary) or it starts to really swell or other troubling symptoms etc. they very often bite defensively and don't give much if any venom as they save that for feeding.
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Old 02-15-2021, 09:10 AM
 
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Here's another corn snake climbing a palm tree for those that enjoyed the first one.

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Old 02-15-2021, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
7,969 posts, read 6,345,973 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by webster View Post
In VA, § 29.1-521 makes killing a snake that is not an imminent danger a Class 3 misdemeanor. Thus, yes, you can kill a rattlesnake - under certain conditions, but not a garden snake. Many states have similar laws.

Personally, I am more worried about being bitten by a black widow spider than a snake. Even now, as cold as it is, they are sluggishly lurking beneath bricks and logs so wear leather gloves.
In Tennessee also. In fact, Most states have laws regarding the killing of snakes, and many snake species are considered endangered, and those also vary by state. The exception is if you are in imminent danger from a venomous snake. However, if you don't even know whether it's venomous, I don't see how you can say you were in imminent danger. There are fines up to $1000 in some states, and even up to a year in jail. OP should learn the laws in his state, and also try to identify the species in his yard. Just killing defenseless animals for fear of a bite from a 6 inch non-venomous snake is ridiculous.

Here are the laws state by state.... https://www.snakesforpets.com/law-on...akes-by-state/

Here are the snakes of North Carolina. Maybe OP will find his snakes ID'd here.

https://greennature.com/north-carolina-snakes/

Red-bellied snake, and Dekay's brown snake are less than 12"in length, so that's a possibility, since he never sees larger ones. They are harmless.

And here's my vote to be the most likely suspect...the eastern worm snake! https://northcarolinanewsdaily.com/n...%20foot%20long. They also come in darker colors with a pinkish belly.

A harmless creature just going about his day eating bug larvae in the soil.

Last edited by TheShadow; 02-15-2021 at 11:10 AM..
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Old 02-15-2021, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Ohio
6,553 posts, read 2,481,925 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by webster View Post
In VA, § 29.1-521 makes killing a snake that is not an imminent danger a Class 3 misdemeanor. Thus, yes, you can kill a rattlesnake - under certain conditions, but not a garden snake. Many states have similar laws.

Personally, I am more worried about being bitten by a black widow spider than a snake. Even now, as cold as it is, they are sluggishly lurking beneath bricks and logs so wear leather gloves.
Agree with this. Some people are terrified of snakes, my mom was one of them. Even a gentle blacksnake was likely to receive the wrath of her garden hoe if she caught one of them around our place.

Didn't inherit that fear I really enjoy snakes, always a joy to find them in and around my garden. Spiders on the other hand, not so much.
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Old 02-15-2021, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
10,685 posts, read 8,099,422 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by howard555 View Post
Over the years we have killed maybe 10 of them. Most were found around a tarp that was covering wood.
We always wondered if such a small snake could be an adult.
If not where is the mama snake?
Nothing close by but a 10 foot over grown area between the back of two yards.
It could be an adult snake, I often find them in the garden, small snakes, usually kill one accidentally tilling the garden up.

Woodpiles are a good area to find copperheads. It could be a juvenile copperhead. Mama isn't involved in their rearing. They hatch and are on their own.

Learn to identify copperheads. It isn't hard. Don't kill the non-copperheads.
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Old 02-15-2021, 04:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bungalove View Post
I agree. They also really like bags of mulch that have been sitting stacked up for a while. I always have to remind my garden helpers because they don't wear gloves and I'm afraid they might get bitten. I've also seen black widows nesting between lengths of landscape timbers - ick! Snakes, on the other hand, pretty much don't scare me at all. In fact, I miss the black snakes I had at my old house. I could pet the larger one.

Yeah...I don't have a phobia about snakes. Spiders though...they make me shiver, even writing this post.
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