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Old 02-26-2021, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
2,128 posts, read 1,093,546 times
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Not to mention fresh horse manure. How DO people transport that?
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Old 02-26-2021, 09:28 PM
 
Location: Mr. Roger's Neighborhood
2,506 posts, read 890,604 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
Not to mention fresh horse manure. How DO people transport that?
I don't know if this is helpful to the O.P., but rabbit droppings are my preferred form of manure. It's easy to transport in buckets, isn't as smelly as the manure of other livestock, and can be used straight away or added to the compost pile.

It's what my dad used on his garden (we kids kept rabbits as pets); I get mine from fellow local Freecyclers.
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Old 02-26-2021, 10:33 PM
 
1,874 posts, read 478,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
But OP stated they gardened in a community garden. Which implies that getting yard waste to the plot is diffcult.

Yep....more of a hassle getting a lot of bags from Home Depot and lugging it up to the community garden. Was much easier/convenient to just get a few wheel-barrow loads of compost/good dark potting soil right there and wheel it 30 feet over to my plot.
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Old 02-27-2021, 07:23 AM
 
1,266 posts, read 1,582,389 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
My grandfather would always just bury kitchen scraps in the garden instead of throwing them away. Eventually they break down and add lightness and nutrients to the soil, and at absolutely no cost to you.
I do that too. I gather veggie scraps, bread, eggshells, coffee and tea grounds etc (no meat) in a tight-fitting compost bucket. When that's full, I dig a hole in the backyard, chuck the bucket contents in, and cover it over with the soil I dug up. My backyard is about a tenth of an acre. I started on one end of the perimeter and slowly worked my way around back to the beginning in about a year. I don't plant directly on top of recent burials - it takes about six months to completely break down. My soil was a soil and clay mix to start with but now is rich and loamy with lots of earthworms. I often get volunteer tomatoes, onions and garlic. My volunteer tomato plants are much hardier and more bountiful than the plants I purchase from the nursery.

I used to have plastic composter kits. Burial is much easier, cheaper, and does not seem to attract varmints the way the plastic composter kits did.
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Old 02-28-2021, 06:07 AM
 
4,331 posts, read 3,849,757 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik4me View Post
Flowers could be ok, but watch out for a persistent pesticides and herbicides residue - I wouldn’t use it on vegetable.

You just never know what is in there; no tests are available by design.
Agriculture learned from the tobacco industry: if they”don’t know” about harmful residue- they can not be found culpable in case of their products harming people.
Thanks! It's not something I ever see any other people using, but it did work great on that application.
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Old 02-28-2021, 10:38 AM
 
Location: On the Edge of the Fringe
5,829 posts, read 4,573,883 times
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My Go To substance for my root veggies is the Leftover Coffee Grounds. Which around here, are in no short supply if you see how much coffee this cat drinks every morning.




SO living here in Sunny (hot) Florida I use containers for pretty much all of my veggies. The reason is that due to heat, sunshine, rain, I can move them around as seasons change.
I have a potato box, during the winter (November to April) I grow white potatoes, then I harvest those, add manure, coffee grounds, and plant sweet potato slips, which I harvest before Thanksgiving'

Now I have a home made wooden Box that grows carrots, radishes beets turnips etc I use coffee grounds there and root vegetables love it.

ROSES , if you are fortunate enough to be able to grow some, also love coffee grounds.


As for the manure, it is rather cheap at the local feed/farm store per bag, I do not use that much except to recondition the solid between plantings

As for fertilizer, I defer across town to my friend who has an acreage and grows all of his food. He does not fear fertilizer, and has taught me how to use Miracle Grow, for example, appropriately. But using a compost pile is best, sadly, I live in a subdivision and have little space for it.
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Old 03-01-2021, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Maine
6,215 posts, read 11,995,184 times
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Buying compost now will give you a good start while you work on soil improvement. I like trench composting. If there isn't enough material to fill a trench you can dig small holes that you'll use for transplants later on. Be sure to mark them so that you know where to dig lightly when planting. You don't want to dig out the enriched soil.

Mulching with newspaper or straw helps control weeds, retain moisture, and feed the microherd. I toss weeds onto the mulch to dry out and break down. Be sure they haven't gone to seed and that the roots will dry and die.



Going by your name, you can put the fish offal to good use. Bury deep so pests don't dig. It breaks down quickly. I do it in my high tunnel and never smell the fish.



In summer I sometimes seed root crops, leave them in the ground but cut the top off so the leaves can't grow. The root will die and add organic matter. It also helps break up hard soil.
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Old 03-02-2021, 03:48 AM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
3,362 posts, read 4,042,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
But OP stated they gardened in a community garden. Which implies that getting yard waste to the plot is diffcult.
I also garden in a community garden, as well as my back yard garden....there is nothing preventing me from using my backyard methods at the community garden...just check in with the garden "manager" first.
There are many ways to improve garden soil....for instance, my town collects leaves from residential yards in the fall and transports them to a huge pile, which eventually breaks down into leaf mulch/compost..perfect for side dressing a row as mulch or tilling in to enrich the soil. Many municipalities offer a free mulch program.

Buying bagged, big box store soil amendments for a "community" garden would not be a method I'd use, or see as a cost effective solution.

Regards
Gemstone1
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Old 03-02-2021, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
10,780 posts, read 8,163,001 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemstone1 View Post
I also garden in a community garden, as well as my back yard garden....there is nothing preventing me from using my backyard methods at the community garden...just check in with the garden "manager" first.
There are many ways to improve garden soil....for instance, my town collects leaves from residential yards in the fall and transports them to a huge pile, which eventually breaks down into leaf mulch/compost..perfect for side dressing a row as mulch or tilling in to enrich the soil. Many municipalities offer a free mulch program.

Buying bagged, big box store soil amendments for a "community" garden would not be a method I'd use, or see as a cost effective solution.

Regards
Gemstone1
My point was more about the transportation of the materials than anything else. I dump leaf mulch on my garden but I probably wouldn't go to the trouble of trying to bag and transport the stuff.

If your town has a free compost pile where you can fill up your own buckets, that's awesome, but not an option everywhere. My county sells it by the yard so you're back to a truck/trailer.
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Old 03-09-2021, 07:11 PM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
18,742 posts, read 26,851,353 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by animalcrazy View Post
I don't do anything to the whole garden. I just add extra soil, compost and composted manure to the hole I dig for the plant. Why feed the weeds? They do extremely well on their own. My garden is about 20x30 and it produces enough tomatoes (4 plants) to fill my freezer for the winter. The kale does very well and two eggplant plants are more than enough for us and a few giveaways.

Some years the green peppers (4 plants) go gang busters, other years, not so much. I do fertilize every week as well. I do not use a rototiller. it seems to kill off the worms. I will be adding a couple dozen night crawlers to the soil this year. I never got to it last year, and I did not plant much last year. Just the tomatoes, a row of green beans, and one beautiful pumpkin.

I think I'm going to give up on planting zucchini and yellow squash from seed. Our springs are wetter and cooler and I can't plant seeds until June. I can get plants in the ground in mid May. My zucchini haven't been producing much the last few years.

Now Mr. Rabbit that's been living in our yard under the deck since last May and eating my rose bush might have to find a new home. It's more destructive then those annoying cut worm.

We have over 30 inches of snow on the ground right now that is slowly melting into the garden. I'm hoping that nitrogen will make for a great garden this year.
Your rabbit story made me think of the 1990's movie "Phenomenon" with John Travolta. Great movie, highly recommended and it has your rabbit in it.
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