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Old 07-30-2021, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Indiana Uplands
26,407 posts, read 46,581,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RetireinPA View Post
well I would be more worried about the tree itself other than limbs...they have a notoriously shallow root ball and if the ground is wet and a good wind comes along.. better safe than sorry. im removing a dozen as soon as we can get the neighbor friends mill moved.
No, mine are very high quality white pines, you might want to check your facts. The roots go straight down into the ground on the one that is closest to my house, and it is completely trimmed back at over 100 ft tall.
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Old 07-30-2021, 08:55 PM
 
Location: Western PA
10,851 posts, read 4,534,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
White Pine is one of the chief keystone species of the old growth and mature second growth in Northeastern forest ecoregions including the Northeastern Coastal forests, the New England-Acadian forests which cover most of northern and inland New England, and to the west, the ecoregions of the Allegheny Highlands forests and the Appalachian-Blue Ridge forests of the Appalachian Mountains.

Its extirpation causes a collapse of the natural ecosystem and the complex web of natural habitats of the flora and fauna covering of a vast region of the continent.

For this reason, I shudder to hear it referred to as a "rodent" species. That is not to say that it is sacrosanct in the garden. By all means if one presents a danger to housing or otherwise disrupts a garden or farm plan, cut it. But denigrating the species is a bit over the top.
we do things a little differently in the woods I guess. You cant build next to them cuz they are weak rooted, and the needles do exchange twice a year, they will rot and eat right thru the asphalt of your roof and play hell with the sheeting, they will do an absolute number on a car parked under one AND the spittle and sap knocks a finish right off. (I watch ones dripping take the roof off a stored delta 88 in about 2 years) You cant pasture one - the shallow roots will cause livestock to injure hoofs and legs, cant mow over one - damage the blades, they are one of the wider growing species of evergreens so that cap, and the shade they impart is huge...they have a low energy density and burn with a lot of soot so they cannot be used for firewood...we just dont value them that much outside of cook forest. they get seeded from the birds and tree chicken and end up being a nuisance when you want hardwoods. My trees I bet are genetically the famous ones in the forest I set next to.



but they do come back the first after a fire or slide or wipeout flood (or glaciers). the wood from them is soft, you can frame with it, its in the 'SPF' grade and you know you have some if the wood is really really light, but you have to dry the bejeesus out of it and not skimp otherwise once you cut the bands on a pallet, within a couple days you have crooked fingers, its not as stong and will rot easy.



Like I alluded to, I got walnut and cherry shaded too much by some so my bud is gonna take 20 with his rig and either dimension them for his house building brother, or make 'log' siding for same and next month I will be taking the bush hog and knocking down the younglings that came back, they grow many many times faster than hardwood. how established is the forest around me? its about 2ish miles from the cathedral in cook forest and a famous tree known as longfellow, and what isnt virgin outside of the park, was put down by CCC - 'bout 80+ years ago
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Old 07-30-2021, 09:00 PM
 
Location: Western PA
10,851 posts, read 4,534,722 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
No, mine are very high quality white pines, you might want to check your facts. The roots go straight down into the ground on the one that is closest to my house, and it is completely trimmed back at over 100 ft tall.

You have a deep tap root, but the cap is about a foot deep and very soft and very broad. It will get into foundations fairly quickly. when I am putting in driveways or drains around them, once I get thru the roots at the surface, there will almost never be anything below 12-18 inches. when we get the straight line winds up north, walk the trails. the blow downs will almost always be whites and the resulting cavity is a great place to locate animal dens
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Old 10-26-2021, 08:57 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Pine needles dropping for a 2nd time this year


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Old 10-26-2021, 10:26 AM
 
Location: Indiana Uplands
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I have one pine tree by my house that is dropping some needles now in October after July this year. This is the large one referenced in my OP, over 90 ft. tall.
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Old 11-17-2021, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I have one pine tree by my house that is dropping some needles now in October after July this year. This is the large one referenced in my OP, over 90 ft. tall.
More dropped this time than back in Summer. What a mess. There's a lawn under there somewhere. lol

Maybe too much water?

July: 10.98"
August: 3.70"
September: 10.74"
October: 6.57"

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Old 11-18-2021, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Indiana Uplands
26,407 posts, read 46,581,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
More dropped this time than back in Summer. What a mess. There's a lawn under there somewhere. lol

Maybe too much water?

July: 10.98"
August: 3.70"
September: 10.74"
October: 6.57"
I use them for extra mulch, in the front yard I have six white pine trees, mostly all over 60-70 ft. tall. I now have an understory of deciduous trees of maple, oak, hickory, and others after removing a large amount of the English Ivy that had overtaken the yard for decades. I've only lived at my house for a few years. Previous owners had zero attention to detail at all on the exterior or interior of the property.
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Old 11-18-2021, 04:58 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
83,518 posts, read 75,307,397 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GraniteStater View Post
I use them for extra mulch, in the front yard I have six white pine trees, mostly all over 60-70 ft. tall. I now have an understory of deciduous trees of maple, oak, hickory, and others after removing a large amount of the English Ivy that had overtaken the yard for decades. I've only lived at my house for a few years. Previous owners had zero attention to detail at all on the exterior or interior of the property.
How did you get rid of the Ivy? My neighbors ivy is creeping onto my property and starting to climb the trees.
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Old 11-18-2021, 08:29 PM
 
Location: Indiana Uplands
26,407 posts, read 46,581,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
How did you get rid of the Ivy? My neighbors ivy is creeping onto my property and starting to climb the trees.
I use garden loppers, gloves, shovel, and take one area at a time. It is a very slow process as I don't use any chemicals to remove it because there were a few dozen small trees that were able to stabilize the very steep slope without the ivy that turned out great.
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Old 12-20-2021, 03:26 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
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Look what I did today. HAHA. Funky looking but the thing just keeps growing back! I did this 3 times now. Chop the top.

When I prune the side branches out it start sending new shoots in the middle again and just keeps growing up





Actually looks cool! Different. lol




Unfortunately I wont have an update on it in 3 yrs because I plan on taking the whole thing down next year or 2. I wanted to have natural shade for one more summer. I don't want to bite the bullet and buy a 15 foot tree yet
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