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Old 08-13-2022, 06:46 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,126 posts, read 11,656,809 times
Reputation: 29808

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
After all those heavy rain events and the consequential floods here in Sydney, I'm gonna have to say that rain is much worse for plants than drought. I lost like 5 plants in my yard due to the wet soil and a few others were injured (with their growth and vigor repressed).

I'd take droughts any day, because at least I can control the water with sprinklers (though when we have drought, we have water restrictions, so I just use a hose).
Where do you think your sprinkler water comes from during a drought?

I feel the opposite way from you. It's easy to control water with hoses and sprinklers IF you have enough water to be doing any watering at all and enough water pressure. We're having high heat, drought and fire conditions right now in a location that actually has enough snowmelt runoff year round but so many people are using water in spite of conservation restrictions there is barely any suitable water pressure. What normally takes me 3 to 4 hours to water every thing on the grounds here with a hand-held hose is now doubled due to such low water pressure. Sprinklers aren't allowed now, but even if they were allowed there isn't enough water pressure to get them to work right.

Also, even if having enough water and being able to water plants sufficiently during extreme and extended heat waves, providing what you may think is adequate enough water does not prevent damage from severe sun scorch and UV damage to foliage, blossoms, fruits and seed production or to the bark and roots of the plants and trees and killing it all off. The amount of sun damage that occurred to the plants here last summer was unspeakable. You are lucky you only lost a paltry 5 plants. That is a drop in the bucket compared to what farmers are losing.

We can't all have everything the way we want it but in recent years with the extreme annual increases in heat and drought conditions here I have to say that summer time has become the most despicable season of the year if I want to keep any kinds of plants alive. Winter can be rough, but this extreme summer stuff is much worse and it's more deadly to all other life forms too, not just to plants. We have a few pollinating insects remaining but nowhere as many as we need. Most of the birds are gone, haven't seen a single hummingbird since last year.

I can just barely wait for autumn to arrive with some gentle rains and breezes and coolness.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 08-13-2022 at 06:59 PM..
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Old 08-13-2022, 09:06 PM
 
Location: Sydney, Australia
11,579 posts, read 11,270,277 times
Reputation: 6228
Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Where do you think your sprinkler water comes from during a drought?

I feel the opposite way from you. It's easy to control water with hoses and sprinklers IF you have enough water to be doing any watering at all and enough water pressure. We're having high heat, drought and fire conditions right now in a location that actually has enough snowmelt runoff year round but so many people are using water in spite of conservation restrictions there is barely any suitable water pressure. What normally takes me 3 to 4 hours to water every thing on the grounds here with a hand-held hose is now doubled due to such low water pressure. Sprinklers aren't allowed now, but even if they were allowed there isn't enough water pressure to get them to work right.

Also, even if having enough water and being able to water plants sufficiently during extreme and extended heat waves, providing what you may think is adequate enough water does not prevent damage from severe sun scorch and UV damage to foliage, blossoms, fruits and seed production or to the bark and roots of the plants and trees and killing it all off. The amount of sun damage that occurred to the plants here last summer was unspeakable. You are lucky you only lost a paltry 5 plants. That is a drop in the bucket compared to what farmers are losing.

We can't all have everything the way we want it but in recent years with the extreme annual increases in heat and drought conditions here I have to say that summer time has become the most despicable season of the year if I want to keep any kinds of plants alive. Winter can be rough, but this extreme summer stuff is much worse and it's more deadly to all other life forms too, not just to plants. We have a few pollinating insects remaining but nowhere as many as we need. Most of the birds are gone, haven't seen a single hummingbird since last year.

I can just barely wait for autumn to arrive with some gentle rains and breezes and coolness.

.
Five large, relatively old and hardy ornamental plants. Not sure why you would compare them to agricultural plants? That's like apples and oranges, no pun intended. I'm not growing a farm. Besides, farmers make more money than me, I can guarantee you that. And they'd get tremendous support and funding.

Anyway, I totally understand your experience. I just thought you'd understand mine as well.
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Old 08-14-2022, 02:13 AM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,126 posts, read 11,656,809 times
Reputation: 29808
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ethereal View Post
Five large, relatively old and hardy ornamental plants. Not sure why you would compare them to agricultural plants? That's like apples and oranges, no pun intended. I'm not growing a farm. Besides, farmers make more money than me, I can guarantee you that. And they'd get tremendous support and funding.

Anyway, I totally understand your experience. I just thought you'd understand mine as well.
Sorry, I got snappy because you said you'd take drought any day because of your personal minor inconvenience with rain and the loss of only 5 plants. To me that sounds like crazy talk to talk about accepting drought that way and I can't help thinking you don't understand the implications of what you said.

I think you should be careful what you wish for.

I do understand and sympathize with your loss of the 5 ornamental plants but it was an insignificant loss that isn't comparable to drought losses that are happening right now around the world that are really serious and potentially life threatening to multiple millions, possibly billions of people.

Last summer's drought and heat domes killed more than 660 people in my region, most of them were helpless seniors or homeless people whose hearts just stopped from the heat. In the grounds at my place where I am the gardener, I lost 73 well established, older and hardy ornamental plants and trees at the same time as people were dropping like flies. And then to top it off there was an ice storm in early December that destroyed another 20 more well established perennial plants and evergreen trees and I'm still clearing and disposing of the mess and damage done from the past year. But even those losses of 93 plants and trees are only ornamental plants that can be replaced, they aren't essential or productive and they don't compare to the magnitude of the deaths of wildlife and livestock and the losses of essential food plants and grains that are occurring around the world because of extreme droughts, heat and fires.

Floods are bad and leave behind a horrible mess and kill lots of living things but it's worse when there's no water and the heat is killing things, supplies and trade goods come to a stop and people are faced with starvation in so many places around the world because of so many droughts, heat waves and fire storms happening right now and there is no escape from it.

Right now here in North America there are many, many regions right across the continent that are stuck this summer with more droughts, heat and firestorms again and there's nothing can be done about it. People are killing thousands of livestock animals or selling them at any low price they can get because they have no food or water for them.

There is a lot of unrest, people's nerves are frayed. People are snappy. And what's happening in Europe right now is a nightmare.

I'll take rain and floods over hellish heat, drought, fire and famine any day. At least with water, even if it's dirty and polluted water, there is still a greater chance of survival of living things that are fighting to endure it.

Okay, sorry for the rant and I'll go away now and take a chill pill. It's a sensitive issue for me.

.
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