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Old 12-08-2022, 07:10 PM
Status: "Barefoot" (set 21 days ago)
 
183 posts, read 53,048 times
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Inspired by the grow your own coffee plant thread.


I just searched it and so many webpages came up!


$9 a pack of cigarettes tobacco growing and getting it right must be difficult or lots of people would be growing it.
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Old 12-08-2022, 07:31 PM
 
Location: mancos
7,750 posts, read 7,621,857 times
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Growing tobacco is easy and the flowers are beautiful.Curing it and cutting it is time consuming and must be done right or a waste of time.I found a good source of tobacco on the black market and for $100 is enough baccy for a year if you roll your own.Seedman.com sells baccy seed and has a good forum of home growers with lots of info.
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Old 12-09-2022, 08:35 PM
Status: "Barefoot" (set 21 days ago)
 
183 posts, read 53,048 times
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Seed man dot com !


Lol, I sent for that I guess 15 years ago, tobacco seeds but never got to finish threw on it, life got busy.


I smoke, yes I do. Shame shame but native Americans or someone called it the peace pipe. Send me a link my forum mail I could roll my own. Probably help me cut back needing to roll up instead of just reaching for the pack.

Smoking is not that bad for you, its just gone out of style. I can't argue its not the smartest thing to do but what the heck I guess. Chills me out and centers me.

Price of cigarettes is crazy when its just a handful of leaves. I am in FL I can grow some tabbacy.
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Old 12-10-2022, 03:06 PM
 
Location: North Idaho
30,861 posts, read 42,390,904 times
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I've heard it is easy enough to grow if you have the right conditions for it, but it is a process to dry it and ferment it and get it processed.

I don't smoke and if I did smoke, the price of cigarettes would inspire me to quit. It's a lot of money for not much product and most likely a huge amount of taxes. I dislike paying taxes and don't pay any taxes that I don't have to pay. Paying voluntary taxes goes against the grain.
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Old 12-10-2022, 08:19 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,504 posts, read 12,280,748 times
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Gosh, I hate to put a damper on other people's aspiring dreams, and being an occasional smoker myself it pains me to pop people's balloons, but as a responsible gardener it's my duty to tell you about this ........

Growing your own tobacco can be done but there's a very good reason why a lot more people don't grow it. It's advisable to grow it somewhere in biologically secure facilities, the way commercial tobacco growers do, where there are no houseplants or garden plants on your own property and also nowhere near any of your neighbours' ornamental or veggie gardens and yards, and absolutely, definitely not anywhere near any agricultural properties.

Tobacco plants, flowers and seeds carry a highly contagious disease called Tobacco Mosaic Virus - TMV for short - (the first virus ever to be discovered by science). It can easily infect more than 350 species of other commercially and wild grown plants and trees around the world. This includes plants such as solanaceous vegetables (e.g., pepper, tomato, egg plant, potato) and vining vegetables (e.g.,beans, peas, cucumber, melon, squash, pumpkin, gourds), as well as a wide range of ornamentals (e.g., begonia, coleus, geranium, impatiens, million bells, petunia) just to name a few. It can also infect certain fruit trees (e.g., apple), vines such as grape vines, even orchids can be devestated, but it has its biggest impact on vegetables, where it can reduce yield and affect quality to the point that commercial crops cannot be marketed.

The virus can be spread by pollinating insects and birds as well as by human and mechanical contact with the plant. Handling the plants and avoiding spreading the virus means having to stick to the strictest hygiene and decontamination regimen with your hands, gloves, clothing, foot wear, gardening tools, mechanical equipment, work surfaces, soil and anything else you use that may come in contact with the plant.

So before you get all excited and think to grow your own tobacco, go online and thoroughly research TMV first and find out what commercial tobacco growers have to be so strict about to prevent contact and spreading of the virus.

.

Last edited by Zoisite; 12-10-2022 at 09:00 PM..
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Old 12-15-2022, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Raleigh, NC
5,295 posts, read 6,040,017 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zoisite View Post
Growing your own tobacco can be done but there's a very good reason why a lot more people don't grow it. It's advisable to grow it somewhere in biologically secure facilities, the way commercial tobacco growers do, where there are no houseplants or garden plants on your own property and also nowhere near any of your neighbours' ornamental or veggie gardens and yards, and absolutely, definitely not anywhere near any agricultural properties..
I have never heard of anyone here in NC that grows it in a biologically secure facility. Once you get outside of most larger towns, you will still see field after field with tobacco. While they do rotate the fields with things like soybeans, they are definitely near other crops.

I have never picked 'baccer, but talking with those that have, it is a very nasty thing to do.
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Old 12-15-2022, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Anchorage
1,542 posts, read 1,072,236 times
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Long time ago I picked tobacco for a few days on a farm in Maryland in exchange for being allowed to hunt the property. The plants were surprisingly big (at least to me). The farmer slowly drove a tractor pulling a flat bed trailer through the field. His hired hands cut the plants at the base and we stacked them on the trailer.


He had a number of drying barns. Almost looked like a regular barn with every other siding board missing to allow air to circulate. He had wood "spears" that we spiked through the base of the plants. About 6 plants to a spear that then hung upside down on racks in the barns. I think the real trick was to know how long to let the plants hang and dry.
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Old 12-15-2022, 12:37 PM
 
Location: B.C., Canada
13,504 posts, read 12,280,748 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by don6170 View Post
I have never heard of anyone here in NC that grows it in a biologically secure facility. Once you get outside of most larger towns, you will still see field after field with tobacco. While they do rotate the fields with things like soybeans, they are definitely near other crops.

I have never picked 'baccer, but talking with those that have, it is a very nasty thing to do.
Thanks for mentioning that. That's sad news and I'm really sorry to learn that. Perhaps all the farmers there should be changing their growing practises to be more biologically secure because tobacco is one of the major field crops in North Carolina. A little bit of research into the long time tobacco industry in that state indicates that TMV is in NC soil in many places and TMV related diseases are major limiting factors of production for both types of tobacco and all other types of TMV susceptible field crops that are grown in NC.

Losses in individual counties can range up to 25% annually and in some fields 100% total losses occur. One third of the total NC burley tobacco crops alone are regularly destroyed by a TMV related air-borne downy mildew. Anything that is air-borne is a risk to other non-tobacco crops as well so I think it would be better if other types of susceptible crops were grown in other locations that would place them at more biologically secure distances from tobacco crops.

.
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