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Old 03-22-2023, 03:29 PM
 
12,058 posts, read 10,264,721 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Diana Holbrook View Post
The point of small plot or container gardening is never the cost of the vegetables. It's about the fun of nurturing them and watching them grow.
True. And then you will use the same containers for years to come - spread the cost over the years. The soil? You don't have to replace it all - add new soil just in the area where you place the plant.

The taste of a home grown tomato makes up for all that!
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Old 03-22-2023, 05:42 PM
 
Location: Ontario, Canada
462 posts, read 284,734 times
Reputation: 1298
Quote:
Originally Posted by Williepaws View Post
So true! and sometimes the challenge of getting the plant to grow and produce.
Canibus is legal here, you can grow 3 plants I believe. I don't partake, but am tempted to grow some just to see how to do it.
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Old 03-23-2023, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Upstate
9,495 posts, read 9,807,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
True. And then you will use the same containers for years to come - spread the cost over the years. The soil? You don't have to replace it all - add new soil just in the area where you place the plant.

The taste of a home grown tomato makes up for all that!
Instead of investing in those expensive containers that the OP mentions, you can just do 18 gallon totes. Those cost less than $10 at Walmart/Target/Home Depot.
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Old 03-23-2023, 02:57 PM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, 615' Elevation, Zone 8b - originally from SF Bay Area
44,550 posts, read 81,103,317 times
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There is only one that tastes so much better fresh off the vine than store-bought to be worth bothering, tomatoes. Because they are picked unripe and gassed to turn them red, most store bought tomatoes just don't have much flavor. The Sungold cherry tomatoes from my garden are like eating candy, the larger varieties are amazing in a BLT, and the Black Prince add a distinctive tang to salads. I also find Cucumbers, Zucchini, Snow Peas, and peppers better home grown but not as much a tomatoes. With the cost of the additional water use, soil amendments, stakes and other things they may become more expensive than the supermarket, but it's well worth it.
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Old 03-23-2023, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Canada
14,735 posts, read 15,016,027 times
Reputation: 34866
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
Always the skeptic, I really got a chuckle out of this one on the GardenSmart TV show
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3rZ5hfYtIlc

A half hour interview & garden tour with a lady who advocates growing veggies in conrtainers. She recommends large containers (20 gal +), easily costing $100 or more each, and using only potting soil (cost $50+ for 20 gal) and a trellis (cost $20+) all to grow just one or two plants...At one point she brags smuggly that basil costs $4 a bag in the store, but a whole basil plant costs only $3. "And how many bags do we have from this plant?" she asks rhetorically...Well, I got news for you, honey-- not $180 worth.

I feel sorry for urban cliff dwellers like Oliver Wendall Douglas whose backyard is just a small balcony 30 stories up. Is it worth it to bother with a coulple veggie plants that give you a harvest of just a couple servings a year?
It's certainly worth it to wealthy people who are indulging their plant growing fantasies that make them happy.

Guido, why are you watching shows like that? It's intended for upper class wealthy people with tons of throw-away money to burn. Not for the likes of you (I know you aren't even close to wealthy by any stretch of the imagination) LOL !!! Don't watch shows like that so then they can't give you cause for complaint and you won't have to feel sorry for anyone.

I think the interview with Pamela Crawford was strictly business for her so she could showcase and promote some of her other lines of products. She has numerous businesses up her sleeves, she isn't just a successful author of books and a hobby gardener on her big estate. She is an architect as well and she has designed 1500 estate gardens for elite residences and country clubs. She's a wealthy self-made businesswoman (kind of like the way Martha Stewart became through her franchises) who owns a few separate businesses and enterprises and employs numerous workers. One of her businesses produces and sells her very own lines of very, very, very expensive name brand glazed ceramic Pamela Crawford Garden Containers & Accessories. Her pottery and garden products are sold online and through garden sales outlets all over North America and overseas.

She is catering to other wealthy customers who live on estates and can afford to indulge their Babylonian Garden fantasies. What could be a better way to showcase her pottery products and accessories other than to grow glorious big attractive plants in them to show off in her books and videos for TV shows? If it works for her I don't begrudge her for all of her business acumen and her businesses that are increasing her success and wealth and popularity. To her I say "You go, girl - Yee haaaa and hot diggity hound dog!"

Oliver Wendell Douglas was a fictitious wealthy city-slicker character in a comedy tv series (Green Acres) about a wealthy city couple moving to rural country living and becoming homesteaders. The whole point of the show was making a comedic mockery of both rich city-slickers and poor country-bumpkin homesteaders with barely 2 pennies to rub together. I don't think any of those kinds of people equate to urban cliff dwellers or the kinds of elite people that Crawford caters to.

When I'm doing container gardening outdoors I generally favour large sturdy black plastic plant pots with drainage trays under them. I like 10 to 15 gallons, sometimes 20 gallons or bigger pots depending on how big I'm expecting the plants to get and what depth the roots require and what their water usage is going to be. I make up most of my own soil mixes for individual plants' needs, some parts of the mixes I may sometimes buy, such as potting soil heavy on the peat side or bags of vermiculite or sterilized pine bark chips, and bags of rotted and crumbled dry horse manure or moist inky black mushroom manure. But the rest of the ingredients in the mixes I source from nature around me. That's including the earthworms that I put into the finished mixes.

One of the benefits of using plastic pots instead of ceramic or clay pots is I don't feel bad if I have to cut up a pot to get a stubborn plant or tree out. I don't like the idea of breaking up an expensive ceramic or clay pot that the plant roots have invaded the pot material.

I don't grow vegetables except for several varieties of edible runner beans. But that's for the aesthetic benefit of viewers who love the looks of them, and for the benefit of the hummers and bees and other pollinators that come to the beautiful cascades of flowers. I don't eat beans myself so I give the freshly harvested beans to my neighbours.


.
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Old 03-23-2023, 08:59 PM
 
1,824 posts, read 796,358 times
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I got spoiled from being able to grow a huge vegetable garden in SoCal. Everything grew well, long seasons, little effort.

I have the space in the PNW for a big garden but don't want to put in the work. I grow tomatoes & strawberries in old containers on my deck & porch. I mix cheap potting soil half & half with my property's soil. I get pony packs at the hardware store. It's minimal cost for enough produce for 2 people. Home grown tomatoes are wonderful. Strawberries are super sweet, unlike the oversize half-green store bought ones.

My kid was used to always having homegrown produce, so I took bags of tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, squash, beans, etc. to them at college. When they moved for grad school, they started a container garden on their apartment patio & were pretty successful. When they & spouse bought a house, the first thing they did was plant a veg garden & fruit trees.

Growing your own food is a good skill to know, in whatever scale is available to you.

Last edited by CalWorth; 03-23-2023 at 09:10 PM..
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Old 03-26-2023, 06:28 PM
 
1,750 posts, read 2,399,151 times
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Thanks for the indoor pepper advice everyone. Memph - I tried to rep you too, but CD said that I have repped you too much already.

Several people have mentioned Home-Grown-Tomatoes. I grant you that home-grown tomatoes are magnitudes of awesomeness better than those pathetic things you buy at the supermarket, grown in greenhouses and quickly ripened with applied ethylene gas. Those tomatoes don't have blemishes but do have the taste of cardboard and texture of cheap rubber. So many foreigners told me how thrilled they were by their appearance and how horrified they were by the texture and taste.

For years, I tried to grow potatoes in the ground and always been severely disappointed. The potatoes were always spindly, gnawed on by critters, and rotting with pathogens. Last year, I put them in Grow Bags for the first time ever, and I was totally blown away about how successful that was. I can personally attest that, the difference you guys notice in store-bought vs. home-grown tomatoes, well, that taste difference is All Of That Plus A Bag of Chips between store-bought and home-grown potatoes.

Is all the time and expense and effort worth it for growing your own potatoes in a bag? The answer is "Hell Yeah."
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Old 03-27-2023, 09:04 AM
 
Location: Eastern N.C.
1,709 posts, read 805,172 times
Reputation: 2017
I picked up 8 kitty litter containers for free (ask your cat loving friends). Going to fill from my yard waste compost pile and suspend from properly spaced 2x4s. I figure big enough for peppers and whatnot. Going to buy 3 5 gal buckets from lowes (5 bucks each) for tomatoes plants. Drill drain holes 4 or 5 inches from the bottom for drainage, deep enough to encourage the roots to seek the moisture but not to rot them either. May get some large shallow storage bins (like for linens) and use for squash. All 3 feet above ground on a frame with 2 by legs for ease of tending and keeping the rabbits at bay. Run a drip hose to the containers for when the skies don't cooperate. Total cost maybe $100, possibly less.
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Old 03-27-2023, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Centre Wellington, ON
5,886 posts, read 6,091,347 times
Reputation: 3168
Quote:
Originally Posted by mgdriver74 View Post
I picked up 8 kitty litter containers for free (ask your cat loving friends). Going to fill from my yard waste compost pile and suspend from properly spaced 2x4s. I figure big enough for peppers and whatnot. Going to buy 3 5 gal buckets from lowes (5 bucks each) for tomatoes plants. Drill drain holes 4 or 5 inches from the bottom for drainage, deep enough to encourage the roots to seek the moisture but not to rot them either. May get some large shallow storage bins (like for linens) and use for squash. All 3 feet above ground on a frame with 2 by legs for ease of tending and keeping the rabbits at bay. Run a drip hose to the containers for when the skies don't cooperate. Total cost maybe $100, possibly less.
What's your motivation for the containers? I generally prefer to grow squash and tomatoes in ground, just because they're very large plants, and require equally large containers and more watering in containers than in ground.

I think rabbits are a problem with lettuce, legumes and carrots/parsley/cilantro, but for squash and tomatoes, I haven't had any problems (I think squirrels, racoons and skunks might try nibbling them though?).
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Old 03-27-2023, 06:32 PM
 
Location: Eastern N.C.
1,709 posts, read 805,172 times
Reputation: 2017
Quote:
Originally Posted by memph View Post
What's your motivation for the containers? I generally prefer to grow squash and tomatoes in ground, just because they're very large plants, and require equally large containers and more watering in containers than in ground.

I think rabbits are a problem with lettuce, legumes and carrots/parsley/cilantro, but for squash and tomatoes, I haven't had any problems (I think squirrels, racoons and skunks might try nibbling them though?).
Just thought easier to control weeds. Better soil deeper for root development. Some water stays close to the roots instead of draining away. Roots dont compete with other plants. Better soil temperature, End of season I can put the soil back into the compost box to rejuvenate before next year.

Seemed like a good, or decent idea but will see later in the summer.
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