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Old 09-14-2008, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Oriental, NC
917 posts, read 2,198,396 times
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I'm renting a house and would love to put in some flowering plants for spring, but... I don't want to spend a lot of money and then not be able to take the plants with me when I leave. Any perennials that will thrive in large pots? Also just how large a pot will I need? Thanks in advance
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Old 09-14-2008, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Alexandria, VA
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Portulaca does really well in pots, comes in a variety of colors and is hardy in your area.
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Old 09-14-2008, 04:18 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
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You can grow most perennials in pots. Especially with winter protection. Pots should be in the 2 to 3 gallon size range for good growth.
Go to google and type in 'growing perennials in North Carolina' and you'll find several sites pertaining to your wants and needs.
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Old 09-15-2008, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Philaburbia
38,218 posts, read 68,137,231 times
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If you have a place to overwinter the pots (an unheated porch or garage), you can keep just about any perennial in pots and they'll be OK the following spring. I've overwintered geraniums, even though they're not perennials, coreopsis, and chrysanthemums successfully.

Cut them back, place them somewhere where they get a little light, and remember to give them a bit of water every couple of weeks or so. When spring approaches, brign them out into the sun and begin watering regularly.
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Old 09-15-2008, 12:37 PM
 
1,815 posts, read 5,129,187 times
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I've heard of people planting perenials in pots and in the winter 'planting' the pots back into the ground and mulching around them to protect them. Then you'd just need to pop them back out of the ground to take them with you. (and fill in the hole, of course)
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Old 09-15-2008, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Floribama
18,385 posts, read 38,024,116 times
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I have had good luck with Vinca in the sun, and Impatiens in the shade.
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Old 09-21-2008, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Oriental, NC
917 posts, read 2,198,396 times
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Thanks so much for all your good ideas!
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Old 09-21-2008, 06:54 PM
 
Location: O-Town
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How about mexican petunias?
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Old 08-23-2010, 07:38 PM
 
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Banana plants are wonderful in pots! You can grow them in 2 gallon pots to start off with, and repot to a larger size later on. They are beautful, and fun to grow! Also, if you have one, you will have pups from it so you never have to buy another one!
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Old 08-23-2010, 08:45 PM
 
Location: Chapel Hill, N.C.
36,502 posts, read 49,849,808 times
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I kind of audition alot of perennials in pots in my garden. I move plants around alot so this makes sense for me. Just "plant" the pot if you have some garden area and lift it when you move. If it will make it thru the winter in the ground, it will make it thru the winter in a "planted" pot. It's called heeling in.
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