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Old 04-12-2009, 04:11 PM
 
596 posts, read 2,597,203 times
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Found this:
"Four species of fire ants are currently found within the contiguous southeastern United States. The tropical fire ant, Solenopsis geminata Fabricius, and the southern fire ant, S. xyloni McCook, are considered species "native" to the area. The two imported species of fire ants were introduced into the United States from South America at the port of Mobile, Alabama. The black imported fire ant, Solenopsis richteri Forel, arrived sometime around 1918 and the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, in the late 1930's. The presence of imported fire ants in the United States was first reported in 1929 by Loding. Both species probably came to the port in soil used as ballast in cargo ships. In the years preceding the arrival of the red imported fire ant, the black imported fire ant slowly spread into adjacent counties in Alabama and Florida. Since its introduction, the red imported fire ant, a much more aggressive species than the black imported fire ant, has spread quickly. By the time of the first official survey carried out by the USDA in 1953, imported fire ants had invaded 102 counties in 10 states (Culpepper 1953). Today, the red imported fire ant has spread throughout the southeastern United States and Puerto Rico (Fig. 1) replacing the two native species and displacing the black imported fire ant. Currently, S. richteri is found only in extreme northeast Mississippi, northwest Alabama and a few southern counties in Tennessee."

From: Lockley: Imported Fire Ants
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Fire ants!!!-imported-fire-ants.gif  
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Old 04-12-2009, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Northeast Tennessee
7,305 posts, read 23,917,294 times
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I like how that little map shows them instantly stopping on the Tennessee-Alabama state line... it goes from infested in Alabama to nothing in Tennessee. I dont see how the change could be that abrupt. You would think it would at least show partially infested and gradually changing.

It also shows a county in South Carolina where my aunt lives as partially infested, but they have TONS of fire ants in that county. In her neighborhood, there were fire any mounds everywhere and when out and about just driving in the country, I saw them all over the place. They have the map changing to abruptly north of the GA/AL borders seems to me.

I also just noticed that map is 1996, so that may explain it. I imagine that fire ants are much farther north now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jctx View Post
Found this:
"Four species of fire ants are currently found within the contiguous southeastern United States. The tropical fire ant, Solenopsis geminata Fabricius, and the southern fire ant, S. xyloni McCook, are considered species "native" to the area. The two imported species of fire ants were introduced into the United States from South America at the port of Mobile, Alabama. The black imported fire ant, Solenopsis richteri Forel, arrived sometime around 1918 and the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren, in the late 1930's. The presence of imported fire ants in the United States was first reported in 1929 by Loding. Both species probably came to the port in soil used as ballast in cargo ships. In the years preceding the arrival of the red imported fire ant, the black imported fire ant slowly spread into adjacent counties in Alabama and Florida. Since its introduction, the red imported fire ant, a much more aggressive species than the black imported fire ant, has spread quickly. By the time of the first official survey carried out by the USDA in 1953, imported fire ants had invaded 102 counties in 10 states (Culpepper 1953). Today, the red imported fire ant has spread throughout the southeastern United States and Puerto Rico (Fig. 1) replacing the two native species and displacing the black imported fire ant. Currently, S. richteri is found only in extreme northeast Mississippi, northwest Alabama and a few southern counties in Tennessee."

From: Lockley: Imported Fire Ants
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Old 04-12-2009, 11:23 PM
 
Location: Palm Springs, CA
74 posts, read 240,719 times
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Yes, the fire ants have come into the Southern California desert (I think they have invaded some other areas of Southern California as well). They apparently came in from some plants brought in from the Southern States. The State had an eradication program which has been suspended because of our budget crisis, so we are left to our own devices with these nasty creatures.
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Old 04-12-2009, 11:31 PM
 
Location: rain city
2,958 posts, read 11,512,195 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Urban Boys View Post
Yes, the fire ants have come into the Southern California desert (I think they have invaded some other areas of Southern California as well). They apparently came in from some plants brought in from the Southern States. The State had an eradication program which has been suspended because of our budget crisis, so we are left to our own devices with these nasty creatures.
That's really really too bad. Because once those ants become established, there is no getting rid of them.

One of the reasons they have become so successful in the southern US is that they evolved a strategy to beat the poisons being dumped on them--they developed the multiple queen colonies. Never seen in their native South America, now multiple queen colonies are common in the south. It makes eradicating them exponentially more difficult.

And this is what makes Award so valuable. It does not kill ants. It prevents larvae from developing and hatching. So the queens can lay all the little eggs they want, but the eggs will never hatch. Brilliant counter strategy by man.

But if I were placing bets, I'll bet the ants win the battle, Award or no Award. There are just so damn many of them and evolution favors creatures with quick reproductive turnover rates.
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Old 04-12-2009, 11:44 PM
 
Location: So. of Rosarito, Baja, Mexico
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Has been a long time since my parents lived in Palm Springs. Seem to recall dad using "FANTASTIC" to spray and kill the ants. Worked for him.
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Old 05-03-2009, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Las Flores, Orange County, CA
26,345 posts, read 84,303,028 times
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Here's one way that actually might work. There is a species of fly that lays an egg inside a fire ant's head. They are the fire ant's only natural enemy:


YouTube - Invasive Fire Ants Lose Heads to Flies
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Old 05-03-2009, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Vermont, grew up in Colorado and California
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Sprinkle some cinnamon or use cinnamon sticks?
Good luck those ants can be such a pain!
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Old 05-04-2009, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Palm Springs, CA
74 posts, read 240,719 times
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Question Award

So does anybody know where we can get this Award product? It is not available at either Lowe's or Home Depot. I don't know if it is available in California yet, but we need something! I cannot go outside barefoot and I am scared for my cute little puppy. I don't want to blast the yard with chemicals since I am sure they will come back from the neighbours yards anyway.

I will try the cinnamon. Somebody told me they do not like coffee grounds, so I am trying that as well.
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Old 05-04-2009, 12:24 AM
 
Location: rain city
2,958 posts, read 11,512,195 times
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Call around to some local garden supply's and feed/farm stores. Lowe's or Home Depot won't carry it.

I quickly googled and found this online availability. Award Fire Ant Bait
You should google around some more for other suppliers.
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Old 05-04-2009, 04:25 AM
 
Location: somewhere close to Tampa, but closer to the beach
2,035 posts, read 4,586,684 times
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yes, check around for this product..ive also heard good things about it. From some recent (albeit scattered) articles, some of the people tracking fire ant progression here in CA. are expecting them to show up here in the S.F. bay area sometime within the next couple years..and trust me, they won't be welcomed..i still remember accidentially disturbing a mound while visiting Florida a couple years back..not fun at all..

Another big pest which has recently shown up further south and is also being closely watched is the Asian Citrus Psyllid..which has been directly linked to spreading Citrus Greening...This one could really become a serious threat to anyone who grows citrus here.. As of nov. 08, they had found this lil' bugger on some of the commercial citrus Stock down in the Imperial Valley..only time will tell if these Psyllids, which crossed over from Mex. also have brought Citrus Greening with them..as an infected tree takes a couple years to succumb and die out completely..

..A side note, if anyone has or knows anyone growing Orange jessamine or Murraya paniculata.. Get rid of it..it is a direct host for the Psyllid ..which is the only known (so far) host for the disease..Murraya has already been banned in Fl.

With the predicted (and already being observed) warming trends here in CA, it will interesting over the next couple decades to see which species of pest insects expand their ranges up out of mexico and establish themselves in the state, let alone any which end up in our back yards..I saw an article just this past week about coddling moths..which apparently have only occured in CA. (at least up here) in say the past decade or so..

As for Fire Ants, yes, they will and are expanding their range into Tenn. as well as other states..and its not a long shot to suggest that eventually they may expand as far north as the Ohio river, or even Southern Nebraska or Iowa..depending on how able they become at handling harsher weather conditions..and being ants, im sure they will find a way to adapt..

Last edited by si33; 05-04-2009 at 04:47 AM..
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