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Old 03-15-2007, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
425 posts, read 1,170,783 times
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We live in Cary, NC and I believe we are in Zone 7. Was wondering how they work for a Privacy Screen and if they are worth planting? My understanding is that they can grow up to 5FT a year and are fast growing. Any one know about these?
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Old 03-16-2007, 09:45 AM
 
346 posts, read 1,677,883 times
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Are these leyland cypresses? We had them in Germany, Alabama and Georgia. Lots of water the first year, give them enough space to breathe and they will grow. 5 feet per year may be a bit much. Have you checked with your extension office?
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Old 03-16-2007, 10:23 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
425 posts, read 1,170,783 times
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Thanks Twostep - I will indeed check with the extension office. The Green Giant's is probably in the same family as the leyland cypress, but I need to do some research.
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Old 03-16-2007, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,276 posts, read 7,533,290 times
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Default Thuja

The common name for Thuja is Arborvitae. We are moving from Oregon to NC so I am in the process of comparing zones. Portland is more towards Zone 8. Usually plantings grow taller here than what's stated in garden manuels. Many people here use the arbovitae as hedging or screen. 'Green Giant' is a hybrid of the Western Red Cedar and will grow 3-5/yr ultimately reaching 30-50 ft., 10-20 feet wide. I would be careful not to plant too close together. The only complaint I've heard from neighbors is that they attract spiders and insects. Check out the NCSU website. They have a lot good information and a list of natives. My favorite hedge is Elaeagnus x ebbingei or common name Silverberry. I planted a gallon 4-5 years ago and it's 12' now. Needs full sun or pt. shade and little water. When the sunlight hits, it leaves just sparkle, small white flowers followed by decorative fruit. Also one called 'Gilt Edge' green, with yellow margins. Don't know you height requirements.
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Old 03-16-2007, 04:57 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
10,461 posts, read 21,511,916 times
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I just read up on the Elaeagnus you mentioned. And though it does not seed true to type, there was a fair amount of discussion about the seedling's tendency to be invasive. Other species of Elaeagnus are considered invasive exotics and should not be planted.
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Old 03-16-2007, 06:40 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,276 posts, read 7,533,290 times
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Default Elaeagnus x ebbingei

http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/c...s-drought.html

Interesting. I was advised on the Raleigh board to check NCSU for native plants. I always try to plant drought tolerant plants. NCSU lists Elaeagnus x ebbingei on their native plant drought tolerant category so I assumed it was okay. Where did you check? I usually check Dirr's Woody plant manual for general information.
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:01 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
10,461 posts, read 21,511,916 times
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I simply copied and pasted the term into google, read the first three or four results, then searched its parentage, one of which is E. pungens, a native of china. I already knew that most elaeagnus derivatives were considered invasive, so I was looking specifically for that info regarding the hybrid you suggested.

Since then I've been reading to make sure I'm not wrong, but it doesn't look favorable.
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:07 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
425 posts, read 1,170,783 times
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We need quite a bit of height in order to get privacy on the deck which is at least 10 ft. above ground level. Understand that the Green Giant, though it can attract bugs and spiders, does less so than other trees of it's kind. I guess deer do not like them, except to rub against. Still favoring these at this point. Interesting thread, I hope more ideas come across. Thanks!
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:24 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
5,276 posts, read 7,533,290 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ellie View Post
I simply copied and pasted the term into google, read the first three or four results, then searched its parentage, one of which is E. pungens, a native of china. I already knew that most elaeagnus derivatives were considered invasive, so I was looking specifically for that info regarding the hybrid you suggested.

Since then I've been reading to make sure I'm not wrong, but it doesn't look favorable.
Could you send me a link. I can't find where x ebbingei is invasive; i.e., scotch broom is invasive Oregon, but my pineapple broom is not per my Plant I. D. teacher.
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Old 03-16-2007, 08:58 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
10,461 posts, read 21,511,916 times
Reputation: 14369
http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=ELPU2
http://www.ebop.govt.nz/weeds/Weed263.asp (broken link)
http://209.85.165.104/search?q=cache:WwvE9xfB_40J:www.invasive.org/weeds/asian/elaeagnus.pdf+E.+macrophylla+invasive&hl=en&ct=cln k&cd=1&gl=us (broken link)

Given that the three likely parent species of x ebbingei are invasive, the odds are high that its seedlings are invasive as well, especially since hybrid plants do not seed true to type and tend to revert to something closer to their parents. None are native to the US.

If it makes you feel any better, quite a few of my favorite plants turned out to be invasive exotics too. Live and learn.

Last edited by ellie; 03-16-2007 at 09:18 PM..
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