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Old 11-08-2013, 02:54 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
206,741 posts, read 79,975,057 times
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Something for tomato lovers to drool over. I have a few new varieties picked out to try. I Need to get an order in soon.
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Old 11-08-2013, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Somewhere out there
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Something for tomato lovers to drool over. I have a few new varieties picked out to try. I Need to get an order in soon.
Wish they all tasted as good as they look thought you ordered yours from some heirloom place?
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Old 11-08-2013, 11:29 AM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Originally Posted by Jaxson View Post
Wish they all tasted as good as they look thought you ordered yours from some heirloom place?
I buy 90% or more from Burpee and have since the 70's. I drooled over there catalog while the snow was piling up. I like to grow hybrids that are disease resistant. Hybrids from crossing two heirlooms together. Now that I can keep track of what I'm doing I'm wanting to plant seed from the hybrids to see what kinds of heirlooms I might can invent. Very few heir looms are productive enough for a canning tomato. I've had to many with green and cracked shoulders which don't give themselves over for being good canners. Marglobe open pollinated might be an heirloom that would be productive enough for canning. If memory didn't totally go over the cliff, the Marglobe is one of the parent stocks of the old heirloom Rutgers. BTW. Rutgers didn't do well in MO were it went form frozen ground to baked ground real fast. They do well I here in a more moderate climate like NJ has. I do need to find some seed from UF developed commercial open pollinated varieties from years back that stand our heat and humidity down here. I've been forced this year to buy tomatoes. I see Tasty Lee tomatoes in the catalog. Those for a supermarket tomato have been the best I've ever had. They actually had a tomato flavor and remind me of the old Burpee VF hybrid market tomato. First tomato I grew with smooth red shoulder with a robust tomato flavor. Seed out of production unless a small seed company took them over.
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Old 11-09-2013, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 14,680,571 times
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Ditto! I am all organic, but I definitely buy improved non-GMO hybrid seeds. I love Burpee. I have gotten really nice ornamentals from them, as well including some native plants.

Currently the peas look like the cold weather has done them in...although I do have couple of flowers. I would like to know where peas actually do well. This is my last year attempting to grow any kind of pea. The kale and lettuces are doing ok. The bok choi seems to have been slowed down by the freezing temps, but is still growing.

I pulled up the tomatoes, peppers et al. Cute stuff still had 1 or 2 little fairy-garden sized peppers on it. LOL Oh man. It was easier just to compost them. The onion and garlic look good, but there were apparently some garlics which had hidden and are now too close together. I separated 1. If it is not too cold, I'll do the rest maybe tomorrow.

My fake cold frame seems to be helping the leaf lettuces grow. They look nice, but still too small to eat.
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Old 11-09-2013, 05:13 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
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Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
Currently the peas look like the cold weather has done them in...although I do have couple of flowers. I would like to know where peas actually do well. This is my last year attempting to grow any kind of pea.
Peas grew well for me in NW MO. I was taught by a local to plant them as early as the ground was thawed out and could be stirred. They would actually sprout up through a light snow, hence the term snow peas. As soon as the temps hit the 80's they were done for. From what I've read cold will get to peas after they have matured. They are definitely a cool weather veggie.
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Old 11-10-2013, 03:50 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 14,680,571 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Peas grew well for me in NW MO. I was taught by a local to plant them as early as the ground was thawed out and could be stirred. They would actually sprout up through a light snow, hence the term snow peas. As soon as the temps hit the 80's they were done for. From what I've read cold will get to peas after they have matured. They are definitely a cool weather veggie.
Sigh. Well, I have given up. I have tried any manner of cool/cold weather planting. They always grow...but at most I get 2 or 4 pods Per Plant. That's unacceptable to me. I've tried various sugar snap peas and snow peas.

It may be me, it may be the soil, it may be the peas, but I don't have the patience to baby vegetables. I am so bitter. Grrr I wasted a lot of money on the seeds. So far I have tried cabbage, kale, peas, lettuce and kohlrabi as "cold season" veggies. So far, kale and lettuce are the winners in terms of producing food without babysitting...in my yard anyway.

This year is my last year trying peas and cucumbers LOL. Some people find these easy to grow. Not me.
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Old 11-10-2013, 04:06 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
206,741 posts, read 79,975,057 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
Sigh. Well, I have given up. I have tried any manner of cool/cold weather planting. They always grow...but at most I get 2 or 4 pods Per Plant. That's unacceptable to me. I've tried various sugar snap peas and snow peas.

It may be me, it may be the soil, it may be the peas, but I don't have the patience to baby vegetables. I am so bitter. Grrr I wasted a lot of money on the seeds. So far I have tried cabbage, kale, peas, lettuce and kohlrabi as "cold season" veggies. So far, kale and lettuce are the winners in terms of producing food without babysitting...in my yard anyway.

This year is my last year trying peas and cucumbers LOL. Some people find these easy to grow. Not me.
sounds like one of two things. Excess nitrogen will cause any legume not to bear well. Or a shortage of phosphorus or/and potash. Different require totally different types of feeding. One analysis does not fit all. If I had a garden spot I would be planting peas now. Maybe in 2 years a place of our own. Just where is the question that has yet to be answered. I miss the black soil of MO but not the snow and ice and sleet. I'm actually content to by frozen green peas. It's Lima Beans that I want to grow and bear.
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Old 11-15-2013, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,168 posts, read 89,928,599 times
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I just learned something; I now am convinced we are never to old to learn: No matter how well you take care of that basil plant, and how pretty it looks, it will not survive in the house unless it is in a window or someplace where it gets plenty of light. My beautiful plant is gone. By next year our screened in porch will be glassed in with heat and air; I will try then to grow it inside.
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Old 11-15-2013, 07:01 PM
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
206,741 posts, read 79,975,057 times
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Two more weeks until I can start tomato and pepper plants. By the time they are 6 weeks old they can go in the ground outside.
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Old 11-16-2013, 04:53 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,168 posts, read 89,928,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nomadicus View Post
Two more weeks until I can start tomato and pepper plants. By the time they are 6 weeks old they can go in the ground outside.
YOU MAKE ME SICK!!!!!
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