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Old 02-20-2016, 01:12 PM
 
Location: stuck in the woods with bears and moose
22,518 posts, read 21,559,296 times
Reputation: 40156

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Since it's going to be 60 out there today I'm wondering if, when I go out tomorrow, the compost in the barrel will still be frozen. If a bit of it is thawed, I can dig some to start the lettuce seeds indoors. I saved my heirloom tomato seeds from last year but it's still too early to start them on the enclosed porch.

The person who posted from London--they don't get winters like we do here in the northern USA. It's due to the Gulf Stream. My dh is from England and he's sitting here talking about how he would be starting his prize winning begonias now if he were back in England. Tomatoes don't do too well there due to the dampness but everything else seems to thrive--with little work.
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Old 02-20-2016, 02:59 PM
B87
 
Location: Surrey/London
11,656 posts, read 8,402,206 times
Reputation: 2958
Tomatoes do grow here, they just don't grow in my particular location due to blight in the soil. The sprig and summers are dry, damp isn't much of an issue by April.
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Old 02-21-2016, 08:34 AM
 
Location: New York
11,340 posts, read 18,034,973 times
Reputation: 6131
Planted some Cilantro the other day. This gives me the most issues, I can never stop it from bolting, mainly between May-Sept. I've seen it bolt right after it put out its first two leaves. I guess I'll try one of the slow bolt varieties this summer.

Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, & Kale are all still alive from last year, surviving a low temperature of 0F with the help of snow cover. I honestly expected them to be dead by January, but they surprised me, I never knew they were that cold tolerant.

My jalapeños have overwintered successfully, both look exactly the way they did at the end of last year. They were too healthy to let go, whereas my disease-ridden tomatoes were practically begging to be put out of their misery, they departed in early January.

Last edited by Infamous92; 02-21-2016 at 08:42 AM..
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Old 02-21-2016, 07:02 PM
Status: "Aka Domestic Goddess" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: SoCal
19,409 posts, read 9,100,248 times
Reputation: 16161
I just picked some frissees and escaroles, I'm clearing out my winter garden for summer planting. Tulips and hyacinths are coming up. Spring is my favorite time to garden.
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Old 02-21-2016, 07:08 PM
 
Location: stuck in the woods with bears and moose
22,518 posts, read 21,559,296 times
Reputation: 40156
I went out and brought in some beautiful compost today. Usually it would have been frozen solid but this has been a mild winter.

I need more and will get more tomorrow.

Then I'm planting romaine on the enclosed porch. I plant it in a long, narrow planter. Grow it now before the warmth comes along and makes it bolt.
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Old 02-21-2016, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
40,329 posts, read 19,616,528 times
Reputation: 46809
From my garden: I used carrots and parsley and lemon thyme and radiccio.....in a lentil soup for supper. It was delicous.

In my garden today .... i did some cleaning up and planted scallions and sweet onions and two tomato plants. I still have about six radiccio plants growing nicely and parsley and other herbs....still some carrots and turnips....and my green beans are coming along. I have green peppers and a couple of very little egg plants.

I harvested two brussel sprout plants; the sprouts were small but a neighboring gardener told me the leaves are edible and delicious....so I have them in the fridge...for later this week.
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Old 02-22-2016, 07:34 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,735 posts, read 90,279,620 times
Reputation: 48666
All my tomato plants upped and died over night. I have no idea why except I did feed them and may have used too much food or something. I might be able to save a couple of them. I am so sad!!!!!
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Old 02-22-2016, 11:31 AM
 
4 posts, read 2,401 times
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I live in north Alabama and am trying hard to develop a garden. It has been a couple of years since I tried and have never been successful. I usually try to plant tomatoes, onions, jalapenos and green peppers for salsa. Both peppers usually do fair but not the tomatoes or the one time try of cilantro. Any suggestions on making them successful or something else I can try?

elston
From my garden: I used carrots and parsley and lemon thyme and radiccio.....in a lentil soup for supper. It was delicious.

I had to do somes research to find out radiccio was and this sounds wonderful. I think I may try to plant some carrots try this. Probably have to buy the others, but if the carrots do good I may try the others. The radiccio looks like a cross between a brussel sprout and a radish. Is that close in what it is. I have never seen it around here, but intend to look this week.

Thanks for your help.
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Old 02-22-2016, 11:35 AM
 
4 posts, read 2,401 times
Reputation: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by Infamous92 View Post
Planted some Cilantro the other day. This gives me the most issues, I can never stop it from bolting, mainly between May-Sept. I've seen it bolt right after it put out its first two leaves. I guess I'll try one of the slow bolt varieties this summer.

Broccoli, Brussels Sprouts, & Kale are all still alive from last year, surviving a low temperature of 0F with the help of snow cover. I honestly expected them to be dead by January, but they surprised me, I never knew they were that cold tolerant.

My jalapeños have overwintered successfully, both look exactly the way they did at the end of last year. They were too healthy to let go, whereas my disease-ridden tomatoes were practically begging to be put out of their misery, they departed in early January.
Did you cover them with something to protect them? What did you use for the cover? I am surprised and impressed that you had that success rate in NY with plants surviving the winter like that. One day I hope to garden like that.
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Old 02-22-2016, 11:50 AM
 
3,450 posts, read 2,365,996 times
Reputation: 7094
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamoo3 View Post
I live in north Alabama and am trying hard to develop a garden. It has been a couple of years since I tried and have never been successful. I usually try to plant tomatoes, onions, jalapenos and green peppers for salsa. Both peppers usually do fair but not the tomatoes or the one time try of cilantro. Any suggestions on making them successful or something else I can try?

elston
From my garden: I used carrots and parsley and lemon thyme and radiccio.....in a lentil soup for supper. It was delicious.

I had to do somes research to find out radiccio was and this sounds wonderful. I think I may try to plant some carrots try this. Probably have to buy the others, but if the carrots do good I may try the others. The radiccio looks like a cross between a brussel sprout and a radish. Is that close in what it is. I have never seen it around here, but intend to look this week.

Thanks for your help.

All I know about cilantro is that it loves cool weather. I had my only successful crop this fall, and I kept pinching back until the plants were bushy. They remained alive outdoors through December and January.

Radiccio is more like lettuce. It's got a distinctive, bitter taste amd is very pretty in salads!
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