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Old 02-22-2016, 12:07 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
48,282 posts, read 22,059,706 times
Reputation: 47141

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonchalance View Post
All I know about cilantro is that it loves cool weather. I had my only successful crop this fall, and I kept pinching back until the plants were bushy. They remained alive outdoors through December and January.

Radiccio is more like lettuce. It's got a distinctive, bitter taste amd is very pretty in salads!
I had never grown radiccio before.....the bonnie plants at Home Depot .....looked really healthy when I was looking for a crop to plant where I had some room. The variety I got is mostly red but varigated with green. Nonchalance is correct .... it is a bit bitter in a salad.....and needs to be mixed with other greens....it is a sturdy green.....and I have seen chefs on TV .... grill it.....I have used it in soups....it stands up to the heat very well. It is very pretty.
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Old 02-22-2016, 02:16 PM
 
Location: New York
11,326 posts, read 20,373,985 times
Reputation: 6231
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamoo3 View Post
Did you cover them with something to protect them? What did you use for the cover? I am surprised and impressed that you had that success rate in NY with plants surviving the winter like that. One day I hope to garden like that.
This winter was fairly mild, aside from the night it dropped to 0F. I covered the Kale and Brussels Sprouts with empty plant pots every time it snowed to keep the weight of the snow from crushing them, other than that they were on their own all winter. They were still partially buried under the snow when it dropped to zero, so they got lucky, they probably would've died if they were exposed to those temperatures.

And the peppers don't count lol, they spent much of January and February indoors.
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Old 02-22-2016, 06:54 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,470 posts, read 16,444,952 times
Reputation: 6522
Quote:
Originally Posted by LIcenter View Post
I also have had zero luck with broccoli, and brussel sprouts. My guess is when they like to grow the sun is not at it's highest for the garden location I have, unlike warm weather crops, that do exceptional there.
Part of my problem with the sprouts is that they need a long season to grow. By the time summer was over and they were ready to make little sprouts, they had been eaten almost to death by worms. Maybe you are right about the broccoli, After waiting for months, I read it needed something that I apparently didn't give it. If it doesn't head at certain time, apparently it will never head.

Shame though. Those two foods are supposed to be good at preventing cancer. I've read that you can sprout broccoli seeds and just eat the sprouts.
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Old 02-23-2016, 04:07 PM
 
Location: SoCal
20,160 posts, read 12,812,805 times
Reputation: 16994
I've Brussels sprouts and broccoli sucessful once before, but there were a lot of bugs. No more, too much work, except I still have tons of seeds.
My cilantro plants are slowly bolting.
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Old 02-24-2016, 07:31 AM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
50,443 posts, read 64,273,051 times
Reputation: 93542
Has anyone tried Bayer systemic, for vegetables, fruits and citrus? I gather it is a fairly new product. I went to a lecture on citrus recently, and the expert is trying it on his citrus trees this year. I winter my 2 citrus trees in the garage, and I just noticed some bugs on them, so I will be using it, for sure.

While reading up on the product, I decided that perhaps if I use it on my entire raised vegetable garden, it might be the cure for my various failures, especially the squashes. A poster at the Bayer website, who is a Master Gardener, wrote that if you use any peat moss, or any bagged soil containing peat moss, you WILL always get an insect or bacteria it contains, unless the peat has been heat treated. The systemic kills it. A few posters there claim it kills the natural predators, but most reviewers think the stuff is great.
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Old 02-26-2016, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
33,003 posts, read 36,546,957 times
Reputation: 43926
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamoo3 View Post
I live in north Alabama and am trying hard to develop a garden. It has been a couple of years since I tried and have never been successful. I usually try to plant tomatoes, onions, jalapenos and green peppers for salsa. Both peppers usually do fair but not the tomatoes or the one time try of cilantro. Any suggestions on making them successful or something else I can try?
have a soil test done.

Soil, Forage and Water Testing Laboratory at Auburn University | Alabama Cooperative Extension System (ACES) and Alabama Agricultural Experiment Station (AAES)

they also have a gardening newsletter.

It's Not Too Late to Plant Early Spring Vegetables - Extension Daily
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Old 02-26-2016, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
48,282 posts, read 22,059,706 times
Reputation: 47141
Mamoo3

Now is the time to get those onions in. I found out that there are two types of onions.....long day and short day. I live in southern florida zone 10.5. I thought that would mean long day....WRONG I need to plant short day onions. Up north in the spring and summer they have more day light and short nights....they plant long day varieties. Here our days and nights are equal pretty much...and that calls for "short day onions". Live and learn.

Many varieties of tomatoes can't take the heat and if it gets up into the 90's and stays there... where you are.....you need to inquire with old time gardeners in your area and find out what grows best around you. there also is a tomato blight that can get into the soil.....and your plants will wither and die no matter what you do. Growing cherry tomatoes might be your best option and growing in containers with fresh soil. (bagged soil from a garden shop.) Cilantro is tricky for me because it bolts, flowers and goes to seed so fast.
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Old 02-26-2016, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Covington County, Alabama
259,024 posts, read 90,790,335 times
Reputation: 138573
The three pineapple plants I put out last year are now about 4' in diameter and maybe 3' high. Need to measure and take a photo. They are growing in 5 gallon buckets.
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Old 02-27-2016, 06:10 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,784 posts, read 24,150,704 times
Reputation: 27094
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pig Smoker View Post
The three pineapple plants I put out last year are now about 4' in diameter and maybe 3' high. Need to measure and take a photo. They are growing in 5 gallon buckets.

that is what I grow my tomatoes in 5 gallon buckets and this year I'm going to plant my strawberries in a old plastic bin that I used for moving a couple of years ago ....
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Old 02-27-2016, 07:50 AM
 
Location: S.E. US
13,163 posts, read 1,731,477 times
Reputation: 5134
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
that is what I grow my tomatoes in 5 gallon buckets and this year I'm going to plant my strawberries in a old plastic bin that I used for moving a couple of years ago ....
Are you drilling holes in the bottom for drainage?
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