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Old 03-29-2016, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
45,694 posts, read 20,814,657 times
Reputation: 47018

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I think that all the okra that I planted (only 7 or 8) have geminated. I started thining them and transplanted a few of the seedlings.

I also note that the "shiso" (Japanese herb) that I planted last fall.....is coming up. I had given up on it and planted scallions...where it was supposed to grow. The seeds must have remained dormant for 6 months and finally awakened. I will need to thin them and transplant a few to containers. Shiso is the herb that is used to seperate and garnish sashimi and sushi plates. It is also used sparingly in salads and to garnish fish or other asian food. It is sort of a cross between basil and mint.

Shiso looks a little bit like coleus. https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...6yd8RLUQEehgY=

The notes on growing shiso say that it can be invasive and self seeds.....so I will have to keep my eye on that baby. When I asked a gardener in Japan about growing it.....he said....once you plant it you will always have it. It comes in both a green variety (thats what I planted) and a dark red variety....that is used in making pickled plums (umeboshi) and to color other foods its characteristic red. I once had a coctail made with shochu (a vodka like liquor) in which the red shiso had been infused. It was delicious and very refreshing.

Last edited by elston; 03-29-2016 at 09:20 AM..
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Old 03-29-2016, 09:08 AM
 
Location: Austin
455 posts, read 410,258 times
Reputation: 625
i compost my egg shells. Just planted four tomato plants, 2 of which are heirlooms. And my first attempt at growing sweet corn. BTW, if you cannot bend over any more, Google "Keystone Gardening." I'm going to try that one of these days.
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Old 03-29-2016, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
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Glenn I will have to check that out ..... bending is an issue for me....that's why my raised beds are such a blessing.

I just did a quick review of the literature.....seems it is especially good in dry arid conditions.....the opposite of where I am in SWFL. Here our summer season is the rainy season with incredible humidity levels.
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Old 03-31-2016, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,472 posts, read 15,640,789 times
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The peas, spinach, choi, garlic and caraflex cabbage are up in the raised beds. The kale and beets in the pots have also sprouted. I planted some swiss chard at the same time as the beets, but that is still hiding underground. I put fertilizer on the veggies, but I'm pretty sure it is not organic. I have a big mound of compost ready, but I've been using it for my ornameltals so far. If I have strength after all the tree planting, maybe I'll make compost tea.

The cold hardy rosemary died AGAIN this year. Oh well. At least I dried some, but the cold-hardiness of rosemary seems to be a myth. The winter savory has come back like a champ, some of the parsley has come back, and so has the sorrel. It is yummy, and I made some soup with some of the leaves.

Inside my baby pepper plants look good, but almost all of the eggplant have shriveled and died. Did they "damp off?" OMG. As much as I love fall, I'm hoping the warming earth means...not death and destruction...but a longer growing season for me. It looks like I'm going to have to start the eggplants outside. Maybe I'll risk it and put out some seedlings early to see if the weather stays warm. I'm so bummed.
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Old 04-01-2016, 06:29 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 22,489,211 times
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well good thing I put all my tomatoes in 5 gallon buckets and put them on our deck along with several buckets with flowers and one big huge pot with lemon cucumbers and everything is doing great in fact I had to move my buckets inside last night because crop with tomatoes is not too good with too much water and we were big storms last night and they came and it is raining like cats and dogs here today . My squash on the other side of the house is doing great and growing like a weed . My lettuce is almost ready to pick another few weeks yet . my flowers have starts to come up from seed as well . I am going to be surrounded by color .My roses have never looked better since I pruned them and fertilized them and we are talking major buds right now and I cannot wait for them to open and smell them LOL .
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Old 04-01-2016, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
45,694 posts, read 20,814,657 times
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I picked 5 japanese egg plants this morning and a red bell pepper....pulled some bunching onions and cut a lot of flat leaf parsley to keep it from taking over the bed. I have little green tomatoes on two of the vines. the herb garden looks beautiful, nasturtiums add a splash of color.....and okra is coming on strong. Japanese green shiso is thriving. I am a happy raised bed gardener.
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Old 04-02-2016, 06:48 AM
 
Location: S.E. US
13,163 posts, read 944,964 times
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I love reading about all your gardens. Thanks for sharing. Sometimes I wish I knew what zone you are in.

It's been in the mid 60's and 70's daytime for several weeks now, but we're predicted to hit 31 degrees one night next week, which means I'll have to bring pots inside. Luckily, so far, everything new is still in pots. Rhubarb is coming up in the garden -- I may have to cover that. Blackberries are growing nicely.

Planting lots of dill this year as a host plant for Monarch butterflies! (I'm sure they won't mind if I pick some for salads.)
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Old 04-02-2016, 07:20 AM
 
Location: Cary, NC (zone 7b)
205 posts, read 259,339 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southward bound View Post
I love reading about all your gardens. Thanks for sharing. Sometimes I wish I knew what zone you are in.
I agree with you. As a suggestion, people could put their zone as their location. It doesn't really say where you live, but would be good enough for inquiring gardeners...just a thought.
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Old 04-02-2016, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Bella Vista, Ark
77,804 posts, read 97,819,117 times
Reputation: 49114
We had frost last night, I am happy we are still a couple weeks away from starting our garden, but I have put out a few pots of flowers and will do some more today or tomorrow. I am guessing our frost days are over this year. It has been such a warm winter.
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Old 04-02-2016, 12:32 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
45,694 posts, read 20,814,657 times
Reputation: 47018
Quote:
Originally Posted by southward bound View Post
I love reading about all your gardens. Thanks for sharing. Sometimes I wish I knew what zone you are in.

It's been in the mid 60's and 70's daytime for several weeks now, but we're predicted to hit 31 degrees one night next week, which means I'll have to bring pots inside. Luckily, so far, everything new is still in pots. Rhubarb is coming up in the garden -- I may have to cover that. Blackberries are growing nicely.

Planting lots of dill this year as a host plant for Monarch butterflies! (I'm sure they won't mind if I pick some for salads.)
If you were wondering about the zone I am in......I am in zone 10.5 Subtropical. That means in the winter it is almost like temperate zone and in the summer it is almost like tropical zone. We are moving out of "cool weather" crops like broccoli and kale and carrots and turnips.....just about past now... my eggplants are doing well...tomatoes will have time to mature before the plants need to be pulled out of the ground probably in June.

Our seasons are determined by temperature and humidity and rain fall. Summer is our rainy season with night time lows in the high 70's and low 80's and highs in the high 80's and 90's. We do not get a hard frost ever....no frosts at all the past two winters. So all the directions on the seed packets that say...."2 weeks after the last frost".....don't apply.

Gardening in SWFL is all new to me. The Gulf of Mexico is not a moderating influence....it doesnt provide cooling night time breezes like the Atlantic side of FL get.

Good Luck with your garden.
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