Welcome to City-Data.com Forum!
U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 04-04-2016, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
48,110 posts, read 21,992,097 times
Reputation: 47136

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
Elston, I have had very bad luck with tomatoes in zone 8, but this season I am trying two new tactics. One is moving a couple of plants to a new location, and two, I am using a new Bayer systemic for vegetables and fruits on all the vegetables. I am not sure if my issues are from bugs or diseases in the soil, but I am hoping this will give me a few healthy tomatoes.
The community garden where I have my beds....is committed to organic principles. So chemicals or even fertilizers other than worm castings or compost...are frowned on. So I will either get or not get home grown tomatoes. If not there are enough farmers markets where I can get really beautiful local tomatoes ....that are grown with a lot of fungicides etc. and I will
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 04-04-2016, 07:52 PM
 
Location: S.E. US
13,163 posts, read 1,686,730 times
Reputation: 5132
Quote:
Originally Posted by elston View Post
If you were wondering about the zone I am in......I am in zone 10.5 Subtropical. That means in the winter it is almost like temperate zone and in the summer it is almost like tropical zone. We are moving out of "cool weather" crops like broccoli and kale and carrots and turnips.....just about past now... my eggplants are doing well...tomatoes will have time to mature before the plants need to be pulled out of the ground probably in June.

Our seasons are determined by temperature and humidity and rain fall. Summer is our rainy season with night time lows in the high 70's and low 80's and highs in the high 80's and 90's. We do not get a hard frost ever....no frosts at all the past two winters. So all the directions on the seed packets that say...."2 weeks after the last frost".....don't apply.

Gardening in SWFL is all new to me. The Gulf of Mexico is not a moderating influence....it doesnt provide cooling night time breezes like the Atlantic side of FL get.

Good Luck with your garden.
I generally look to see what posters have indicated for their location. Some do, so it gives me an idea of planting seasons, if there are any changes or breaks in those. I always think of the FL folks as 'lucky'.

You must stay busy in the garden year-round! What fun.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-05-2016, 10:28 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
48,110 posts, read 21,992,097 times
Reputation: 47136
Quote:
Originally Posted by southward bound View Post
I generally look to see what posters have indicated for their location. Some do, so it gives me an idea of planting seasons, if there are any changes or breaks in those. I always think of the FL folks as 'lucky'.

You must stay busy in the garden year-round! What fun.

I am having a wonderful time and yes it is year round.....although it took me several years before I could grow anything in the vegetable garden....SWFL is VERY challenging....and lots of the crops that I grew in New England .... dont do well here....many dont grow at all.....the heat and humidity in summer is just too much for them. I started last Sept/Oct and did pretty well....with fall crops....however we had an unusually hot winter with lots of rain and it was murder on the winter type crops brocolli, spinach, even the eggplant went dormant....but now its gang busters.....I am ordering and going to try my hand with some subtropical plants come June/July.....and then look forward to my second cycle in the fall.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2016, 01:21 AM
 
Location: Land of Free Johnson-Weld-2016
6,470 posts, read 16,391,935 times
Reputation: 6520
Good for you Elston. If you are up for trying new things, you can grow malabar spinach and okra. These should do well in a tropical climate. So should peppers. You may also have the luxury of growing trees and shrubs adapted to the area, that the rest of us suckers can't grow outside: bananas, guava, papaya, sugar apple, avocado etc. Up here it is still colder than satan's armpit and it is fertilizer time at the farms, so it smells a bit like it too. LOL That can only mean one thing: spring has sprung.

The cold-season veggies are all still small, but still alive. The snow peas are leading the pack in growth now, and hopefully will keep it up. I may also need to think out my little bok choi's and also remember to plant a second crop. Sadly all of the eggplant seedlings are dead and I have fungus gnats. The peppers are doing well, though. That is it for me as IMO starting plants inside is for suckers and not worth it to me.

I'm going to have to find hot weather veggies that do well direct-seeded in the garden for a short season with no transplanting needed. Once I've used up this batch of seeds, that is. So far, zucchini, beans and Okra. Too bad I love eggplant so much...but there has to be a short season variety...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2016, 06:31 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
48,110 posts, read 21,992,097 times
Reputation: 47136
Quote:
Originally Posted by kinkytoes View Post
Good for you Elston. If you are up for trying new things, you can grow malabar spinach and okra. These should do well in a tropical climate. So should peppers. You may also have the luxury of growing trees and shrubs adapted to the area, that the rest of us suckers can't grow outside: bananas, guava, papaya, sugar apple, avocado etc. Up here it is still colder than satan's armpit and it is fertilizer time at the farms, so it smells a bit like it too. LOL That can only mean one thing: spring has sprung.

The cold-season veggies are all still small, but still alive. The snow peas are leading the pack in growth now, and hopefully will keep it up. I may also need to think out my little bok choi's and also remember to plant a second crop. Sadly all of the eggplant seedlings are dead and I have fungus gnats. The peppers are doing well, though. That is it for me as IMO starting plants inside is for suckers and not worth it to me.

I'm going to have to find hot weather veggies that do well direct-seeded in the garden for a short season with no transplanting needed. Once I've used up this batch of seeds, that is. So far, zucchini, beans and Okra. Too bad I love eggplant so much...but there has to be a short season variety...

I have planted okra and it is up and developing its second set of leaves.....I garden in a couple of 4x8 raised beds.....so I got a small size Okra (full size pods) developed by Burpee. I checked out malabar and new zealand spinach....the malabar grows as a fairly substantial vine and it looked as if it would take over...I did order a couple of japanese greens that seem a bit less expansive and will plant it after the tomatoes come out. I have a bell pepper plant and a cajun and a hungarian hot pepper...(not in the same bed with the bell)
zucchini succomb to fungus down here as do cukes....my garden guru says better to not even try.

Eggplants are my mainstay in the garden. There is a "seminole pumpkin" (think squash) that is raised down here but it needs room.....and sweet potatoes are a big crop....and can be container grown....maybe another year I will get a big tub and give them a try. Collards don't know that they are related to the cabbages and not supposed to do well in the summer...but they tolerate heat very well. I have two plants in my garden ...and that should be enough to keep me in greens this summer.

Happy Gardening.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-06-2016, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
48,110 posts, read 21,992,097 times
Reputation: 47136
I just read that pepper plants tend to drop their flowers when the temp is over 90 degrees. We have a lot of that type weather in summer....and indeed I remember dropped flower blossoms and no production till it cooled down. I think the leaves tend to curl and drop when exposed to very bright hot sun...for too long.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2016, 06:19 AM
 
Location: South Carolina
14,785 posts, read 24,071,257 times
Reputation: 27092
Not this weekend but next weekend I m going to fill the one plot I dug up weeks ago with nothing but different types of squash . There are table queens out there now and they are doing very well but I'm putting in delacata , black beauty , hubbard , and spaghetti and acorn and see what comes up and does well .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-07-2016, 08:10 AM
 
Location: S.E. US
13,163 posts, read 1,686,730 times
Reputation: 5132
Quote:
Originally Posted by phonelady61 View Post
Not this weekend but next weekend I m going to fill the one plot I dug up weeks ago with nothing but different types of squash . There are table queens out there now and they are doing very well but I'm putting in delacata , black beauty , hubbard , and spaghetti and acorn and see what comes up and does well .
I never had much luck with squash. The bugs took over until I learned how to look for the eggs early on. That's way too much trouble because you have to take each leaf and spray the eggs on the underside of the leaf. No thanks. I'll get my squash at the farmers market.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 10:25 AM
 
4,184 posts, read 3,397,060 times
Reputation: 9132
My carrots are up! Woohoo!

Of course, tomorrow we expect snow.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 04-08-2016, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Florida (SW)
48,110 posts, read 21,992,097 times
Reputation: 47136
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nonchalance View Post
My carrots are up! Woohoo!

Of course, tomorrow we expect snow.
poor man's fertilizer...I thnk they will be fine.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Garden

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:19 AM.

© 2005-2024, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Contact Us - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37 - Top