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Old 07-10-2020, 03:24 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,896 posts, read 22,819,848 times
Reputation: 25172

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
SMART move! My moms neighbor was selling her home and needed to get rid of everything in the house. Told us no charge to take something as we were good neighbors.


I walked around and the only thing I took were her 2 cases of mason jars and some new lids. Jackpot.


Now I have to google "All American Pressure Canner". Probably just a fancy name for a pot where you give the jars a bath?


Anyway - I heard jars are limited as well. Either the production plant is busy focusing on more important orders due to the Virus or like you said, the demand is higher since people want to preserve stuff.


Do you put anything on the bottom of the pot?


EDIT: Wow, that's an All American Pressure Canner? I just use this.
You have to either use a pressure canner or freeze certain vegetables, meats etc. Botulism is not a friendly bug.

When we make our soups they all get pressure canned. Certain veggies like collard greens, green beans, peas, even squashes all get pressure canned. We have two of the standard black hot water bath canning pots. You don't need to pressure can acidic foods like tomatoes, salsas, pickles etc..

https://nchfp.uga.edu/how/general/en...ned_foods.html

Quote:
Whether food should be processed in a pressure canner or boiling-water canner to control botulinum bacteria depends on the acidity of the food. Acidity may be natural, as in most fruits, or added, as in pickled food. Low-acid canned foods are not acidic enough to prevent the growth of these bacteria. Acid foods contain enough acid to block their growth, or destroy them more rapidly when heated. The term "pH" is a measure of acidity; the lower its value, the more acid the food. The acidity level in foods can be increased by adding lemon juice, citric acid, or vinegar.

Low-acid foods have pH values higher than 4.6. They include red meats, seafood, poultry, milk, and all fresh vegetables except for most tomatoes. Most mixtures of low-acid and acid foods also have pH values above 4.6 unless their recipes include enough lemon juice, citric acid, or vinegar to make them acid foods. Acid foods have a pH of 4.6 or lower. They include fruits, pickles, sauerkraut, jams, jellies, marmalades, and fruit butters.
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Old 07-10-2020, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,896 posts, read 22,819,848 times
Reputation: 25172
The backside of our house has some gardens as well. We just put added 3 dumploads of top soil back there and re-graded around the house. It was almost solid shale and mostly weeds. We used our stimulus money to install a professional irrigation system as well. Last year we had a wildfire that blew up behind us up the hill and we said "We need a green zone BAD".

This is the shop and momma's garden room. She has 3 sheep tanks set up with some herbs and hot peppers.



This is the retaining wall that basically stretches the length of the shop all the way around to the side of our house. Maybe 100-150ft? Don't recall. It's two tiered in spots. Herbs, flowers and other such things dominate the wall.









We had to re-run a propane line after the irrigation system was installed. Those guys cut it in a few spots. Had to refill and will have to re-seed. But after 10 days our grass is starting to fill in.


Last edited by Threerun; 07-10-2020 at 07:18 PM..
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Old 07-10-2020, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,896 posts, read 22,819,848 times
Reputation: 25172
In the garden the peas are just about ready for picking.




There's small bok-choy in the sheep tank, two rows of peas and a row of potatoes on the left.



Head cabbage is looking good- just thinned them. Time to fertilize.



Our tomatoes and corn are just starting to take off. Very late season for them. I planted Ambrosia corn this year and I think it was a mistake. I'm going to stick with the Northern Hybrid which did awesome last year. Oh well- I tried.
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Old 07-13-2020, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
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June 9


July 11



Thankfully getting warm temps. Hope this continues. Sept 15 comes around fast.
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Old 07-15-2020, 07:26 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,896 posts, read 22,819,848 times
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Pea picking this evening. Got 1/2 bucket on this round.



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Old 07-17-2020, 09:09 AM
 
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Wow..that's quite a haul! ^^^^
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Old 07-17-2020, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
83,626 posts, read 75,686,410 times
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Nice bean harvest!
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Old 07-17-2020, 01:31 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,896 posts, read 22,819,848 times
Reputation: 25172
It looks like a lot, but after shelling we yielded 7 cups. Peas are one of those 'labor of love' vegetables. It takes a while to pick 'em, a long time to shell by hand and really short time to eat them!

We've got a crop of bok choy coming off Saturday and we'll be freezing that.

Last edited by Threerun; 07-17-2020 at 01:55 PM..
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Old 07-19-2020, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
19,896 posts, read 22,819,848 times
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Put up the rest of the radishes. A quick and easy pickled radish recipe. About 5 pints or so.



These are awesome with sandwiches and salads.
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Old 07-20-2020, 07:28 AM
 
4,200 posts, read 3,423,158 times
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Looks good! We could never grow radishes, but I'd be happy to buy some to pickle.
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