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Old 12-19-2020, 04:13 PM
 
195 posts, read 155,063 times
Reputation: 348

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Will they ever come up with vegetable trees so that veggies can become perennial like many fruits are? I'm sure science and tech is already there to make it happen.
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Old 12-21-2020, 01:39 AM
 
10 posts, read 2,631 times
Reputation: 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by oregon911 View Post
Will they ever come up with vegetable trees so that veggies can become perennial like many fruits are? I'm sure science and tech is already there to make it happen.
I agree. I think it's only a matter of time before it becomes publicly available
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Old 02-27-2021, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Idaho
1,758 posts, read 1,426,802 times
Reputation: 6766
Thank you. Your remark brought back good memories of last year's crop.

I could not believe that I was able to use all of frost harvest. Almost all the green tomatoes ripened and still tasted quite good up for almost two months. I made paste from the big ones and froze the cherry tomatoes to use them for soup, stir fry and pizza topping. I still have a dozen quart-size bags in the freezer.

I had about 4 quarts of greenish tomatoes left in mid December, I just froze them as is to make soups. Green tomatoes went really well with ham and pork.

Last year, I did not start to germinate the seeds until mid March and had to buy few heirloom tomatoes, eggplant and sweet peppers plants from the nursery. The ones which I grew from seeds were either too small or got eaten by cutworms in early spring.

I decided to start the seedlings early this year (Feb 26) and to use an Ipower seedling heating mat with thermostat temperature adjustable knob.

I tested the heating mat when first got it 3 weeks ago and it worked fine (75F at lowest setting and 85F at highest setting). Yesterday, I was concerned to find that it was too hot (85-90F) at the lowest setting. We put a towel under the plastic seed boxes (I put the seeds on wet towels in the food storage containers) and got the temperatures at 75-82F (the edges of the mat are hotter than center). It was a huge disappointment this morning to find the mat and the boxes stay at RT. I cranked the setting to the highest setting and still could not any heat.

It is clear that the mat is defective. It's a good thing that I can still return it to amazon and get full refund.

I don't know what reliable heating mat brand to order and whether the order will arrive in time. It's likely that I will do without a heating mat and it will take several weeks for 'hot weather' seeds to germinate!!!

Last edited by Beretta; 02-28-2021 at 10:04 AM..
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Old 02-28-2021, 11:03 AM
 
Location: On the Edge of the Fringe
5,852 posts, read 4,583,506 times
Reputation: 5094
I worked on my Garden today. It was challenging, but I made it through.
It was challenging because I am recovering from COVID for 30 days now. I get winded, tired easily but tested negative so at least that part is good.

SO I grow my garden in Florida in containers. Our soil is poor, I live in a subdivision with limited space and excessive rules, I also know that in Florida, BUGS live in the upper layers of the substrate. Container Gardening does solve much of the problem.

The other issue is the growing season. I built a Potato Box out of scrap lumbar, fence posts, it is about 3 feet deep, 4 x 3 feet. I filled it with composted soil, coffee grounds, and potting mix. I grow White Potatoes November to April, then Sweet Potatoes from April to November.


I have found that the best item for growing most plants is a good old 5 gallon bucket, under $4 at Tractor Supply, or, as my friend said, free on the side of the road. We tack a few small drain holes in the bottom for drainage, then fill it with appropriate potting soil. Now One lady grows EVERYTHING in those 5 gallon buckets. She showed me her Brussel Sprouts, Peanuts, Sweet Potatoes, Herbs.....You name it, she grows it.

The advantage of the buckets is that as the season changes, as the angle of the oppressive Florida sun changes, it is possible to partially shade the plants which would die in the summer Florida Sun, such as tomatoes.

My Old Lady suggested that I use the leftover lumber from all the past Halloween projects and make a new planter. Using 2x4s and planks, we built a 1 foot deep planter which is 3 feet off the ground. Miniature carrots and radishes do well in it this time of year. Kale is growing too.

Now today, a new problem. I cleared out an old larger plastic planter, moved a tomato from one that was way too small. Discovered that under it, there was a colony of tiny ants .

Not wanting to use pesticides, and not wanting the ants to think of moving inside, I poured WHITE VINEGAR all over the concrete area, including to the doorway into the house.
I got this info from a pro in the bug business. He was telling me that if you get ghost ants or Pharaoh ants in your house, to clean the entire area where u find them with white vinegar. Not only is it toxic to the ants, it removes the scent trail which they use to find the way from the nest to the food. I have used it inside and had good results. Today, I used it liberally on the porch, so far the ants appear to be gone.

Finally, I am growing greens, kale, lettuce, mixed greens. I have squash plants hanging from the rafters outdoors, they are both decorative and edible.

Soon, in another couple of months, it will be very hot here, and the containers will be changed out. The lettuce, radishes, greens will be replaced by peas and beans, and the tomatoes will find a mostly shady place for the summer.

And there is one more thing. The Carolina Reaper (not reefer) from last year, somehow survived, came back bushier and healthier, and already has some buds on it. I am excited that I am growing something that even I cannot eat ! But it will go into a good wing sauce.
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Old 03-02-2021, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
15,479 posts, read 17,812,909 times
Reputation: 16679
Quote:
Originally Posted by LargeKingCat View Post
I worked on my Garden today. It was challenging, but I made it through.
It was challenging because I am recovering from COVID for 30 days now. I get winded, tired easily but tested negative so at least that part is good.

SO I grow my garden in Florida in containers. Our soil is poor, I live in a subdivision with limited space and excessive rules, I also know that in Florida, BUGS live in the upper layers of the substrate. Container Gardening does solve much of the problem.

The other issue is the growing season. I built a Potato Box out of scrap lumbar, fence posts, it is about 3 feet deep, 4 x 3 feet. I filled it with composted soil, coffee grounds, and potting mix. I grow White Potatoes November to April, then Sweet Potatoes from April to November.


I have found that the best item for growing most plants is a good old 5 gallon bucket, under $4 at Tractor Supply, or, as my friend said, free on the side of the road. We tack a few small drain holes in the bottom for drainage, then fill it with appropriate potting soil. Now One lady grows EVERYTHING in those 5 gallon buckets. She showed me her Brussel Sprouts, Peanuts, Sweet Potatoes, Herbs.....You name it, she grows it.

The advantage of the buckets is that as the season changes, as the angle of the oppressive Florida sun changes, it is possible to partially shade the plants which would die in the summer Florida Sun, such as tomatoes.

My Old Lady suggested that I use the leftover lumber from all the past Halloween projects and make a new planter. Using 2x4s and planks, we built a 1 foot deep planter which is 3 feet off the ground. Miniature carrots and radishes do well in it this time of year. Kale is growing too.

Now today, a new problem. I cleared out an old larger plastic planter, moved a tomato from one that was way too small. Discovered that under it, there was a colony of tiny ants .

Not wanting to use pesticides, and not wanting the ants to think of moving inside, I poured WHITE VINEGAR all over the concrete area, including to the doorway into the house.
I got this info from a pro in the bug business. He was telling me that if you get ghost ants or Pharaoh ants in your house, to clean the entire area where u find them with white vinegar. Not only is it toxic to the ants, it removes the scent trail which they use to find the way from the nest to the food. I have used it inside and had good results. Today, I used it liberally on the porch, so far the ants appear to be gone.

Finally, I am growing greens, kale, lettuce, mixed greens. I have squash plants hanging from the rafters outdoors, they are both decorative and edible.

Soon, in another couple of months, it will be very hot here, and the containers will be changed out. The lettuce, radishes, greens will be replaced by peas and beans, and the tomatoes will find a mostly shady place for the summer.

And there is one more thing. The Carolina Reaper (not reefer) from last year, somehow survived, came back bushier and healthier, and already has some buds on it. I am excited that I am growing something that even I cannot eat ! But it will go into a good wing sauce.
Glad you're on the mend!!
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Old 03-03-2021, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
75,645 posts, read 59,330,351 times
Reputation: 13614
Quote:
Originally Posted by LargeKingCat View Post
I worked on my Garden today. It was challenging, but I made it through.
It was challenging because I am recovering from COVID for 30 days now. I get winded, tired easily but tested negative so at least that part is good.

Now that's the spirit! Don't let it bring you down! Good to hear you're recovering. Soon you'll be doing laps around the garden.


Quote:
Originally Posted by LargeKingCat View Post
My Old Lady suggested that I use the leftover lumber from all the past Halloween projects and make a new planter. Using 2x4s and planks, we built a 1 foot deep planter which is 3 feet off the ground. Miniature carrots and radishes do well in it this time of year. Kale is growing too.

Nice! a lot of stuff going on there. Cool to hear you used old lumber to make a bed. Very cool. Where's the pic?

Quote:
Originally Posted by LargeKingCat View Post
And there is one more thing. The Carolina Reaper (not reefer) from last year, somehow survived, came back bushier and healthier, and already has some buds on it. I am excited that I am growing something that even I cannot eat ! But it will go into a good wing sauce.
Ha, sad to say same thing happens with me. I used to be able to eat hot peppers. Now I grow them for looks and to give away.
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Old 03-03-2021, 11:03 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
29,460 posts, read 28,504,930 times
Reputation: 37204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambium View Post
Now that's the spirit! Don't let it bring you down! Good to hear you're recovering. Soon you'll be doing laps around the garden.

Nice! a lot of stuff going on there. Cool to hear you used old lumber to make a bed. Very cool. Where's the pic?

Ha, sad to say same thing happens with me. I used to be able to eat hot peppers. Now I grow them for looks and to give away.
I can no longer eat them. I grow them for my son. He likes food hot, hot, hot.
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Old 03-06-2021, 09:51 AM
 
289 posts, read 95,612 times
Reputation: 826
Hey all, wanted to get some input on the new raised beds I'm getting ready to put in. They are the corrugated metal type with open bottom. Will be 2 beds, each 6.5'x3.5'

These are going into an area that already has ground cover plants and various wildflowers growing. Should I be putting weed barrier fabric down before I fill them with compost and soil? I guess my main concern is will the ground cover grow up into the beds and take over? Or will weed barrier just block the garden plants from growing deeper down into the soil? The beds are 17" deep if that makes a difference.

Any input is appreciated. We have only ever had room to do container gardening, very excited to get some more room to grow now.
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Old 03-07-2021, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
15,479 posts, read 17,812,909 times
Reputation: 16679
How deep are the raised beds?
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Old 03-07-2021, 07:31 PM
 
289 posts, read 95,612 times
Reputation: 826
Quote:
Originally Posted by Threerun View Post
How deep are the raised beds?

17" deep


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