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Old 10-21-2022, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,364 posts, read 20,083,060 times
Reputation: 19851

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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemstone1 View Post
Frost did not kill the tomatoes and peppers, but after 3 mornings of frost, there won't be many days of harvest left. Frost got the beans, squash, melon and pumpkin vines. Total pounds of produce to date going to the needy...5,553.
Wow that's a big garden!
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Old 10-22-2022, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
80,466 posts, read 68,534,912 times
Reputation: 15520
Quote:
Originally Posted by twinkletwinkle22 View Post
Cambium--when I get the volunteer plants dug out I am planning to make one into a compost space like your hole, for kitchen veggie scraps. Every year make a new compost hole in a new place to improve the clay soil.

I never thought I'd be able to stick a shovel into the soil without effort until I started doing that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by gemstone1 View Post
Frost did not kill the tomatoes and peppers, but after 3 mornings of frost, there won't be many days of harvest left. Frost got the beans, squash, melon and pumpkin vines. Total pounds of produce to date going to the needy...5,553.
I love the fact that you kept track of the weight of produce! I started doing that but lost interest after a few times plus didn't know whether I should for those days harvesting only 1 or 2 items.. Haha
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Old 10-23-2022, 12:45 AM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,364 posts, read 20,083,060 times
Reputation: 19851
We’re getting mixed precipitation now. Rain and snow. We picked 4 lbs of collards and boiled them with a Dan Doodle sausage, we’ll put that up in pints.

Winter salad.
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Old 10-23-2022, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Boydton, VA
4,141 posts, read 5,277,703 times
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"I love the fact that you kept track of the weight of produce!"
The County Extension agent does that to help justify the use of the County owned land we use, to justify the garden budget he gets from the County, and for our personal satisfaction of knowing what we've accomplished for the year.

The garden is large, the agent and I realized this year that we needed help with the upkeep, so he solicited the help of a local Master Gardener group....it made the weeding and picking go much faster.

We use a drip system from (Berry Hill Irrigation) for those dry days of summer....we are fortunate they are local, but they ship.
For those who are unfamiliar with the "tomato clip" method of keeping plants up off the ground, check 'em out in the catalog. We usually have 4 - 80' rows of tomatoes, I tried the "Florida Weave" (google it) method of tying tomato plants, and it seemed too laborious to me. I like the clip method, it works great on the determinate varieties that don't grow too tall. I use a sturdy tomato stake, dangle several strands of tomato twine from the top, and clip the growing vines to the twine to train it upright. The clip has a vise like hinge that pinches the twine, and holds fast. They work reasonably well on the pepper plants too.
I use concrete wire cages for tomato plants in my meager home garden...it lasts for years and is tall enough to contain most varieties.

For cukes, we use rows of 16' livestock panels from Tractor Supply to keep the plants off the ground....this works for runner type green beans as well. These panels can also be bent into a hoop type trellis with both ends anchored in the ground for those short on space.

The garden is surrounded with a sturdy high tensile hog wire fence, with electro-net sheep fence angled out at the top to make it deer proof, and with chicken wire at the bottom to keep little critters out (this is where the County budget comes in handy).
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Old 10-23-2022, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,364 posts, read 20,083,060 times
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That’s cool. We have a number of community gardens in Helena that work with the extension office and Helena Food Share. My wife volunteers a lot of time on one of them.
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Old 10-23-2022, 12:34 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,364 posts, read 20,083,060 times
Reputation: 19851
Officially DONE. (Well almost).



It's snowing today. Irrigation system is winterized, we're down to about 24 quart and pint jars left to use. We're putting up some of the tomatoes today, I boiled some collard greens with a Dan Doodle sausage- we'll pressure can that today. We're waiting for the potatoes to die back to harvest them and a few beets, carrots and I think an onion or two. My wife is getting the seed for a cover crop- 2/3 of the garden will be fallow next year. 2022 was a good year for us.
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Old 10-29-2022, 11:01 PM
 
Location: Oakville, ON
3,894 posts, read 4,741,605 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gemstone1 View Post
Frost did not kill the tomatoes and peppers, but after 3 mornings of frost, there won't be many days of harvest left. Frost got the beans, squash, melon and pumpkin vines. Total pounds of produce to date going to the needy...5,553.
We got three frosts here too - Oct 21, Oct 28, Oct 29. The first of those was the harshest I think at 29-30F. Others were more like 30-31F. Still, the peppers, tomatoes, tomatillos and ground cherries are pretty much unharmed. Beans, eggplants, squash and okra took some damage, ex outer leaves and leaves high up on trellises (near the ground took less damage). None of those are growing much in the cool temperatures though. Our next frost threat will probably be in 1-2 weeks, I'll just pick what's left then. Cool weather crops like radishes, parsnip, collards, seem to be doing well.
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Old 10-30-2022, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Near the Coast SWCT
80,466 posts, read 68,534,912 times
Reputation: 15520
I had 4 or 5 frosts where the air temp was mid 30s(F) except this morning it actually hit freezing for few minutes. Garden was done 3 weeks ago. Typical for this area. Can't wait until we can actually have produce in October. We're warming too slowly.


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Old 10-30-2022, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
17,364 posts, read 20,083,060 times
Reputation: 19851
Potatoes are in. 71lbs this year.



From left to right- Reds, purple somethinganother, Yukon Golds and Butterball.

My wife asked for an early Christmas gift. After trying to run 50-60lbs of tomatoes with her Kitchen Aid mixer attachment thing she was done. Exceedingly tedious and not a great tool for large scale. Took her hours to complete. It would produce more juice and not enough good pulp for sauce. Basically we wound up with a watery marinara.



This thing is the ticket! 3 different strainers. With the sunrise sauce tomatoes it extracted the skin and seeds and did a fantastic job producing a full bodied sauce with a lot of the meat of the tomato coming out like it should. She did 50lbs in less than 15 minutes. She's making sauce right now- the house smells wonderful!
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Old 11-03-2022, 09:17 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
31,624 posts, read 32,811,129 times
Reputation: 41125
My last ripening tomato is rotting because all of the rain. If it had been dry it might have been OK. I guess that the last one was the tiny one that was blown off of the vine three days ago. I've never had a tomato this late. I'll be happy enough with the one.
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